Do you save your seeds ?

Discussion in 'Survival & Sustenance Living Forum' started by purehavoc, Jul 3, 2012.

  1. purehavoc

    purehavoc New Member

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    I ask this because everything we eat that has seeds in it I let dry out , bag up , mark and put away. everything from , peppers, watermelons, apples, tomatoes,cucumbers, corn , beans etc. never know when your gonna need them and I would guess they would be good for several yrs if they are kept dry and in a cool ,dark place .
    just another prep for me I guess :D
     
  2. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    I occasionally try. I have noticed lately that Alot of the seed bearing foods have been treated or something and will not grow. Not that I'm known for my green thumb.
     

  3. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    That Seems like a pretty sweet deal.
     
  4. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    OK folks. time for Agriculture 101- also known as not starving to death, because humans cannot survive on meat alone.

    Many- make that MOST- of the garden plants you buy are hybrids. That means that two varieties were cross pollinated, in order that the seed would have a desired characteristic from each parent plant. We have been doing this for more than a century. Characteristics may be size, flavor, early ripening, disease resistance, etc.

    When you plant, let's say, Big Boy tomato seeds from the seed packet, you are planting a hybrid cross between a cherry tomato and a Rutgers. And they are decent tomatoes. HOWEVER- save the seeds, and plant them, you will NOT get Big Boy tomatoes. You will get cherry tomatoes. The hybrid reverts to the dominant parent.

    The plants where you CAN save seeds, and get the same plant are known as HEIRLOOMS. Instead of Big Boy, if you planted Cherokee Purples or Mortgage Lifters, and saved the seeds, they would grow more Cherokee Purples or Mortgage Lifters. They are not hybrids, and breed true. However, they do not have the characteristics that the plant science folks bred for- like being resistant to verticillium wilt, a plant disease that can wipe out your crop in 2 days.

    Now, I am gonna get on my high horse here for a minute. I hear folks talk about how in a TEOTWAWKI scenario, they are going to take their firearm of choice, head for the woods, and live off of deer and cattle that they would whittle a steak off'n. REALITY- the deer will be gone pretty quickly- and beef and venison both spoil in 2 days in hot weather if you do not have knowledge and means of preserving it. And if I find someone sniping at the livestock- that is really not going to end well.

    Want to improve your long term possibility of surviving the really bad long term scenario of your choice- without spending a lot of money? Head for the library, and grab some books on gardening.

    What is the easiest carbohydrate you can grow without specialized machinery, that keeps well? The humble potato. How early can you plant them- and how do you plant them- and why you should not be looking for a packet of potato seeds. How would you store them- and what are the plant pests that eat the plants- and how do you combat them when there is no Sevin dust?

    What common plant varieties are heirlooms? Which are typically hybrids? Where can you BUY heirloom seeds? How do you store them (seed life varies from a couple of years to 10 yrs, depending on seed)

    If you did not grow up as a country boy (or girl) with a hoe, go do some reading. Even if the world does not end this year, growing your own is rather satisfying. If you do not have a large garden space, get the book called "Square Foot Gardening". No garden at all? Learn about container gardening.

    OK- time for dinner. Will get off my high horse. Am going to go have tomatoes, peppers cucumbers and onions from our garden.
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2012
  5. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

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    Oooh...........I love a man that knows his biology and genetics. [​IMG]
     
  6. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    Sounds like winds wants you to drop your genes. Lol
     
  7. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Naw:p- she runs a hospital lab, and understands genetics. That, and she likes salads!
     
  8. HockaLouis

    HockaLouis New Member

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    C3;
    Rutgers clearly dominates Cherry Tomato -- I didn't hear they even made it to March Madness.

    If beef doesn't last long untreated in warm weather, based on experience, would you recommend high horse?

    And, I wouldn't admit to growing up with a hoe even if I did...

    :D

    PS: My seeds are in the 'fridge.
     
  9. TLuker

    TLuker Active Member

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    Heirloom plants are definitely the way to go. And gardening, along with canning, are skills that come with practice. Saving seeds is better than not saving seeds, but really getting into gardening would be even better.

    Also get in the habit of just being aware of the natural resources all around. I found a large blackberry patch in plain view of my plant. They appear to be some sort of old domesticated variety left over from a long gone farm. They're literally hanging like grapes by the thousands. I'll have a blackberry cobbler and several jars of preserves before the weekend is over with almost no work. And no one else has even noticed them and probably never will.

    C3 is spot on about the deer and cattle. All of the obvious stuff is going to get wiped out quick, but there's a lot of not so obvious stuff that no one even stops to notice, anymore. Having knowledge about those type of things now could come in really handy. When do you plant what? But also, when do blackberries come in? That also goes for apples, pears, peaches, plumbs, blueberries, wild strawberries, gooseberries, pecans, walnuts, crab-apples, muscadimes, scuffadines, and wild rice. I think everyone should know what all of those common plants look like without fruit, and then when to go back to the ones they stumble across. Maybe even plant a few fruit trees close by? I know I'm bringing some of those blackberry plants back to plant in various locations around my area.

    In case no one noticed, I really like blackberries. :)
    The sad part though, and I hate to admit this, I've worked at this plant for four years and I never noticed them before. This patch is about 40 yards wide and 200 yards long. There were so many red berries there last week that a passing jet would have spotted them. 20 years ago I would have spotted that patch in winter and been waiting for them this summer. It just made me realize how little I've been paying attention to little things like that.
     
  10. W. C. Quantrill

    W. C. Quantrill New Member

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    All your prepping is in vain if you do not stock lots of salt, sugar, and vinegar. Without those items you cannot preserve any of the fruits, vegetables or meats. With the basics of salt, sugar, vinegar, and some spice you can either make jerky, or biltong, or can the meat so that it will keep forever. Same with fruits and garden veggies. Without the salt, sugar, and vinegar, when the fresh is off of it, the rest is spoiled.
     
  11. DrumJunkie

    DrumJunkie New Member

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    Most of what we plant around here are from collected seeds. The seeds have been collected every year for many years going back to my wife's grandparents. I have bought some seeds but I usually wont even try to keep any of those for reasons stated earlier. Most of the bought seeds are just to see how they grow.
    All of our fruit trees where grafted by my father in law to get whatever desired effect he's looking for. Some pretty cool trees I have to say.:) He usually gets these started off some very old trees that grow around property that his father owned.
     
  12. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Hock- will ride the High Horse down to the store. Rustle my cattle, we may try Long Pig. :p

    Good points on salt, sugar, and vinegar. Can make my own vinegar (vineyard and small orchard) and usually have 100 lbs or so of salt (water softener)

    Regarding hoe- mine had a letter E. :D

    Seriously- folks that think they can live on meat are going to have a rude awakening. Besides the things we plant and grow, there are the things that grow naturally here. Ever look at the calories and oil content of walnuts and hickory nuts? Part of my AW CRAP! library includes some edible plant guides, and 3 of Euell Gibbons books. Blackberries, raspberries, blueberries, strawberries, and sloes for sure- but I also grew up eating Crecy Salad (dry land cress for those not from the South) and I LIKE it.
     
  13. DrumJunkie

    DrumJunkie New Member

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    Knowing about edible plants that grow wild is a great thing to know. WE still make some interesting salads her in the summer. Lots of wild "greens" in these hills. I never liked polk though :(
     
  14. TLuker

    TLuker Active Member

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    I've never met anyone that does? Its sort of like opossum. The recipe I always heard for that was nail a opossum to a piece board, put it in a pan with potatoes and onions, cook for three hours in the oven at 375. When done throw away the opossum and eat the board. :)
     
  15. willshoum

    willshoum New Member

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    Heirloom seeds....

    Any of you guys have the beef heart tomato seeds, i haven't been able to find them any where......:(
     
  16. willshoum

    willshoum New Member

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    The day after........

    Along with every thing else, how many of you can successfully graft trees.....I currently have ten trifoliata, or bastard orange trees that need grafting, from lemons to blood oranges and grape fruit, the problem is I'm not good at grafting..... I also have twenty pecan trees thanks to the crows and tree rats, these can also be grafted from trees already producing nuts.....:)
     
  17. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

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  18. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    believe it or not, my grandmother use to boil up polk salad and she liked that stuff! i couldn't even stand the smell of it cooking. polk salad is one green that i can do without. i don't really care for spinach either, but will eat it long before i'll eat polk salad!:eek:
     
  19. MrWray

    MrWray New Member

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    We have that stuff growing everywhere here, my grandparents and great grandparents liked it, its to bitter for me.