Do you consider cost per round?

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by BlueTurf, Mar 6, 2012.

  1. BlueTurf

    BlueTurf New Member

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    I have been reloading for about 30 years now. I load four handgun cartridges and four rifle cartridges. Over the years I have been able to develop some ammunition that works very well in my firearms. I have been able to save money also, but that is not my primary concern.

    I share my reloading information with friends and many times we have been able to help each other in finding our pet loads. I know one guy who gets on my nerves sometimes because he always asks, "What is the cost per round"? He is a penny pincher extreme and is driven by "doing it cheaper". His quest to do it cheaper affects the way he loads ammunition. He uses the fastest-burning powder he can get away with so he can use less of it. He uses the cheapest bullets and other components he can find. He places a lot of emphasis on the "cost per round". I am not talking about someone who goes through a lot of ammunition. He doesn't shoot very often so I can't see how he can possibly be saving more than pennies every time he shoots.

    What about the rest of you? Do you load your own ammo to save money or to develop ammo that will work great in your guns, or both? Do you place much emphasis on "cost per round"?
     
  2. Trez

    Trez Well-Known Member

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    Wow! I though my buddy was bad... :p He just shoots lead with reduced loads, and is always makin' fun of me cause I want to reproduce the military loads using jacketed bullets..

    I guess I got into it to save money (..sort of) Mainly it was just so I can keep my old war horses fed... Making 7.7 Jap or .30 US is alot cheaper and easier than buying it... And now that heavy ball 7.62x54 is hard to get, Im gonna have to start working up a load for my Mosin PU "sniper"
     

  3. Overkill0084

    Overkill0084 Active Member

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    Both I guess.

    Reloading, in & of itself will save on the cost per round unless you get carried away with some special purpose application.
    I enjoy the economy of the process, but I'm simply not willing to jump through hoops to squeeze out that last half cent worth of savings.
    I shoot mostly cast so I'm at the point where if I want significant savings from this point, I will need to start casting my own bullets and saving up to order in bulk quantities. The point of diminishing returns is different for for different people.
     
  4. BlueTurf

    BlueTurf New Member

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    Trez, I can see where you would make some big savings by loading your own 7.7 Japanese ammo. That stuff is expensive, and you can make ammo that is better than factory loads.

    The guy I am talking about is just plain cheap. He gets real petty with his reloading savings methods, and everything else for that matter. He drinks Keystone Light. Did you ever know of anyone who drank Keystone Light for its taste? :D

    Seriously though, when I get together with my reloading buddies and we share information about our loads, he always starts off by saying something like, "But, what is the cost per round?"
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2012
  5. Ledbetter84

    Ledbetter84 New Member

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    I agree, I don't reload solely because it's cheaper. It is a bonus! But to me it's like someone tying their own flies because it's cheaper. (it's not , it's a money pit !)
    I reload because I can't buy the rounds I want, and I want to tweak them to my rifles/handguns
     
  6. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    i started loading because my second centerfire rifle was a 458winmag. even in the 80's that thing wasnt cheap to shoot. now its close to 80$ for 20 rounds if you buy off the shelf.

    nowadays i just enjoy reloading. i dont save anything really, it just lets me shoot more rounds that are higher quality tuned to the rifle than i would have bought off the shelf.
     
  7. aandabooks

    aandabooks New Member

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    I don't reload yet. I'm in the process of saving my .45ACP brass. When I do take the plunge into reloading it will be to save money. Don't know that I will try to get it done as cheap as possible but I will need to be saving money to justify reloading.
     
  8. The_Kid

    The_Kid New Member

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    Yes to both.
    I shoot every day, and what I like to do is hit my target every day. Before I started hand-loading, I used to keep taking shots until I hit the target. Now that I have ammo that is accurate, if I'm good enough, I can hit my target in one shot... which "save money."

    Yes I do... but I still need them to hit the target, so I use the slower more stable powders and save money with the bullet choice. Hornady 150gr FMJ bullets work well in all my rifles, so I like to shoot them since they are $18 per 100.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2012
  9. tqu9047

    tqu9047 New Member

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    I guess I started reloading to save some money. I can never go to the range without either my SO or one of my daughters coming with me. I am glad they want to but it gets expensive. I reload now to build up some stock of ammo in case anything goes down. I even cast my own lead. So once I get the primers and powder, I am pretty much off the grid as far as how much ammo I have.

    Tim
     
  10. TLuker

    TLuker New Member

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    I just got into reloading for all the normal reasons:

    1. More choices in bullets
    2. Better ammo
    3. To save money

    The money aspect was a huge influence. I don't mind paying upfront for something but I hate things that keep costing money (like payments). That's the core part of my personal financial philosophy. Reloading fits perfectly with that. There is the up front cost and continuing cost but reloading greatly reduces the continued cost of shooting in general.
     
  11. scottybaccus

    scottybaccus New Member

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    I consider cost per round anytime I'm shopping for ammo. I also base powder choice on charge weight for a desired load. If two powders have a 20% difference in charge weight for a given velocity, I use the one requiring the smaller charge weight, presuming similar cost per pound of powder. That equates to a free powder charge on every 5th round loaded.

    Yes, I am that effen cheap....

    I shop for retail prices around $.30 for .223 practice ammo in a brass case.
    I am reloading .45 acp for about $.25, last I checked.
     
  12. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I always consider cost but not to the extreme. I can load 357 mag using good components for 1/2 the cost of factory which means I can shoot twice as much for the same money. I cant load 223 for much less than the cheap ammo but a lot less then the expensive ammo again using good components like Blitzking bullets. I use the cheap ammo as a source of brass. I wont turn down a good price on good bullets.
     
  13. LarryWMcneely

    LarryWMcneely New Member

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    When I was a Kid my dad taught me and I think the main reason then was it was cheaper because the small town we lived in did not have a gun store to get ammo and the walmart of the day was sears and roebucks and that took weeks so it was cheaper to load up on components by mail and the occasional drive to Phoenix lol . In my late teens clear to my thirty's I shot practical pistol , cowboy action and high power so it was for accuracy and to save money as I shot so much and cast bullets are cheaper than jacketed lol . Now it is for fun because I enjoy doing it and I can load bullets for every thing I shoot way more accurate than I can buy it and if I dont tack on my time to load them I would say it is cheaper . I can fire form the casings for my rifle , seat the bullet so that it is just one thousands of an inch from the bore of my rifle , I can spend the time weighing every charge to work up just the right load for my choice of bullet and at this point this ammo is custom made for my rifle and might not even chamber in another . To me that is priceless because it would cost way more than I would to pay to have ammo custom made for the chamber of one rifle lol .
     
  14. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    I do check to see what my cost per round is. But not to the extreme. I pour my own lead. But for me it is a hobby/pasttime. I enjoy shooting what I made. It has become almost an addiction. I pick up brass that I don't even shoot. Then I end up buying another gun because I have a bunch of brass for it. It is a vicious circle!!!
     
  15. BlueTurf

    BlueTurf New Member

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    You are not even close to being as cheap as the guy I was referring to. He was complaining that a load someone recommended to him would cost $.11 per round, and that was just too much.
     
  16. scottybaccus

    scottybaccus New Member

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    Then he is out of touch with the costs of raw materials. My numbers don't even include brass because I reuse it indefinitely.

    $.11 won't even buy the bullet I put in one round.
     
  17. AleksiR

    AleksiR New Member

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    I only reload .308Win and the reason I got into reloading was saving money on ammo, because quality .308 ammo is darn expensive around here. So, yes, I consider the cost per round but my goal is to get the most accurate ammo for the least amount of money.
     
  18. BlueTurf

    BlueTurf New Member

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    Yep, you got it. I also think this guy is obsessed with the cost-per-round factor to the point where he is out of touch with the cost of materials. Maybe he is not counting the brass, but there are other materials involved.
     
  19. BlueTurf

    BlueTurf New Member

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    According to the numbers on my reloading scale there are 437.5 grains per ounce which translates to 7000 grains per pound. I can buy one pound of many popular powders here for about 21.00 This guy and I were talking about our .45acp loads He used Bullseye and I use Unique. He uses about 1 grain of powder less for his loads than I use for mine. I am not going to bore you with all of my calculations, but I determined the most he could save per box of 50 is approximately $.15, yes, fifteen cents. So, he can save by using a faster powder but it is not much. He would save $1.50 on powder if he loads 10 boxes. Primers here are about $3.99 right now for a box of 100 and I haven't seen cheaper primers anywhere, including online where shipping and Hazmat charges will be added. I am of the opinion that if less than one dollar makes or breaks someone they cannot afford to shoot. I guess someone could save a lot on bullets if they made their own with tire weights or something like that. I just don't care to do this. I don't mind paying for the jacketed bullets. Each to their own I guess.
     
  20. BlueTurf

    BlueTurf New Member

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    Same here. I reload for .308 and probably have more of them than all of the other cartridges I shoot. I see you are in Finland. How expensive is Lapua brass there? It is very good brass and very expensive here. Since it is made in Finland I was just curious if it is sold cheaper there.