Do Not Approach A Burning Compressed Gas Delivery Truck!

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by Vikingdad, Jul 19, 2013.

  1. Vikingdad

    Vikingdad New Member

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    [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PlXsxi20ymc[/ame]
     
  2. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    It's amazing how far those canisters can travel.
     

  3. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    It is also amazing how many stupid people drove past on the other side of the freeway while they were blowing up. I am betting the only reason no one else came through is because enough people stopped that no one else could get through.
     
  4. KG7IL

    KG7IL Well-Known Member

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    I will add this to the "Don't Run With Scissors" file
     
  5. Overkill0084

    Overkill0084 Active Member

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    That's right up there with "don't stick your wiener in the fan." One would think that some things would go without saying.
    The mindless droning of the car alarms added something to the overall product. ;)
     
  6. Vikingdad

    Vikingdad New Member

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    I found it amazing that so many idiots would stay so close and then the cop car pulls up closer before getting the crap scared out of him and he backs off. Even the guy holding the camera slowly backs farther and farther away. I think he did it despite his being distracted by taking video.

    Personally? I would have abandoned my car and gotten away from there on foot.
     
  7. texaswoodworker

    texaswoodworker New Member

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    Wait, we're not supposed to do that? Since when? :confused:



    :D:p
     
  8. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    For those that have not heard the term- it BLEVE. Pronounced as BLE-VEE. Boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion. The liquid in a pressure vessel- in these cases propane or isobutane, is heated, and comes to a boil inside the container- which is ruptured by pressure. The boiling liquid immediately changes to a rapidly expanding ball of gas.

    The video of the PEPCON plant in Henderson NV shows what happens when several million pounds of an oxidizer- ammonium perchlorate- is involved in a fire.

    [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t_pMihqJR6o&feature=player_detailpage[/ame]
     
  9. Vikingdad

    Vikingdad New Member

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    So what sort of pressure does it take to rupture an undamaged tank like that C3?
     
  10. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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  11. KG7IL

    KG7IL Well-Known Member

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    Our old trash fire (in the good old days) would sometimes pop an aerosol can. Best we could do with the resources we had.
     
  12. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Dad- the standard pressure relief valve setting is 250 psi. In a fire, pressure goes up, valve opens, released propane burns but does not explode.

    However, a pool fire under a tank, or a jet fire impinging ON the tank does 2 things. It raises pressure- AND- at the top of the level of liquid in the tank, a stress line is developed. Metal below liquid level transfers heat to liquid. Metal ABOVE liquid cannot transfer heat to vapor. Uneven heating results, causing deformation of metal. At around 121% above the PRV setting, under THOSE conditions, wall can tear, and BLEVE.

    Changing temp of propane makes major change in pressure inside tank.
    70 F = 96 PSI
    100 F = 127 PSI
    110 F = 230 PSI

    Under MOST circumstances, the PRV does it's job, and no explosion. However, heat it rapidly enough, pressure increase is SO rapid, the PRV cannot keep up. And propane tanks are built to a VERY different spec than ordinary compressed gas cylinders. Oxygen tanks are at 2080 psi, and have a rupture pressure far higher.

    Yeah, I am just a veritable fount of obscure and useless info.
     
  13. Wrangler44

    Wrangler44 New Member

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    In the fire service we call this job security.