Do I need a dummy round to practice dry firing my rimfire 22?

Discussion in '.22 Rifle/Rimfire Discussion' started by flw, Mar 25, 2011.

  1. flw

    flw New Member

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    Do rimfire rifles still need a dummy round to practice shooting techniques?

    Also what is the actual name for those dummy rounds you can buy for this purpose?

    Thanks
     
  2. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    If you want to dry fire a rimfire I would just keep some spent cases and use them. What happens is the firing pin on a rimfire can hit the edge of the chamber causing a burr.
     

  3. NGIB

    NGIB New Member

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    They're generally called snap caps and yes - rimfire's need them...
     
  4. Poink88

    Poink88 New Member

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    This. ^^^ Remember to rotate so you'll hit different parts around the casing.

    I did try mine by cutting a thin plastic (coke bottle) and placed it where the ammo would be hit my the firing pin and it (plastic) is not dented enough that I do not worry now and dry fire away. YMMV
     
  5. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    rimfire snap caps can damage the firing pin of 22lr. as above use a spent casing. some rimfires are designed to be or can be safely dry fired the gsg 1911-22 i have the firing pin doesnt strike the chamber. ruger mk1,2,3 series are designed to be safely dry fired.

    mileage may vary
     
  6. .22hustler

    .22hustler New Member

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    As a thought, if it's a bolt action, just remove the bolt.
     
  7. Jay

    Jay New Member

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    I don't dry fire anything without snap caps.... but that's just me. To each his/her own.
     
  8. .22hustler

    .22hustler New Member

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    I dry fire all center-fire guns; shotguns, rifles, etc. I believe in releasing the spring tension. I NEVER dry fire a .22 for the above stated reasons... Hey Jay, what Marine Division?? My b-i-l was with the 5th in RVN. He was at Khe Sanh during the siege.
     
  9. Jay

    Jay New Member

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    Attatched to 3/26, 3rd Div, before and after the TET Offensive
     
  10. .22hustler

    .22hustler New Member

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    I was U.S.Army, field artillery, 1970-72.
     
  11. Drriley

    Drriley New Member

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    While some guns are designed to be dry fired (Glock models for one) I have seen firing pins broken due to the shock of the pin hitting something other
    than the primer. I ALWAYS use snap caps unless I know specifically the
    gun was made to be dry fired. even then it bothers me..........
     
  12. OzarkRecluse

    OzarkRecluse New Member

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    Ruger 10/22's are ok to dry fire.
     
  13. .22hustler

    .22hustler New Member

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    It would seem to me that the firing pin on a center fire rifle wouldn't be hitting anything, same as a shotgun. I believe you might mean that on the rear of the pin it might hit part of the bolt that the pin rides in.. Either case, to each his own.
     
  14. Jay

    Jay New Member

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    Every firing pin I've ever seen has some sort of a mechanical stop to prevent the pin from just flying out of the bolt/slide when the hammer hits it. When that firing pin comes to a stop, it's designed to stop on the primer of a cartridge. The mechanical stop is NOT (in my opinion) designed to act as a dry-fire impact area. It's just my simple opinion that if you keep hammering the mechanical stop by dry firing, either the firing pin, or the stop will break. For the relatively low price of snap caps vs. 'smith work, or a new firing pin....... well, you get the idea....

    Everyone has their own opinion, and that's mine.... :)
     
  15. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    So I guess that 20 to 30 hours of dryfire practice I did in the military ruined my M-16? Never seen any adverse side affects of dry firing any center fire pistol or rifle.

    The Dime on the barrel is the best way to master a smooth even trigger pull in my mind.
     
  16. Jay

    Jay New Member

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    Might be the reason the Army tech manual calls for inspection of the firing pin retaining pin, before re-assembling the bolt carrier group. I wonder (respectfully) how that retaining pin might get damaged?
     
  17. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    So you never ever inspect parts on a firearm when you are cleaning? Plus I'm sure the usmc manual tells you to inspect the firing pin and other parts.

    Is it a good idea to use snapcaps when dry firing any firearm sure we are just saying it is not a 100% must have for centerfires. I never ever dry fire a rimfire.
     
  18. Jay

    Jay New Member

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    Well, some rimfires are designed to be dry-fired as a course of re-assembly.... The Ruger Mk II series, for example. My point is simply that if you pound on a piece of metal long enough, you're gonna damage it. Just like I'm gonna die one of these days, but that doesn't mean I should run out and play on the interstate.

    Sure, I inspect the pin, but most likely damage to it, is gonna come from dry-firing. Lots of things have happened in the world of firearms, that I haven't seen. Obviously, other folks have seen lots more.

    Carry on as you see fit, sir ... that's what opinions are all about.
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2011
  19. .22hustler

    .22hustler New Member

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    If memory doesn't quit me, we inspected that pin to be sure the pin was put in the right way. If you put it in from the opposite way, the bolt would jam?? Anyways, your explanation about dry-fire seemed sound. I believe I said as much when I spoke about the firing pin hitting the back of the bolt, but I didn't get it in the same words as you did. Thanks for the clarification....
     
  20. Jay

    Jay New Member

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    I'm not saying that any centerfire will be damaged with the first dry-fire, and I'm not trying to come off as a know-it-all. But after 20 years as a tool maker, I know for a fact, that if you beat two pieces of metal together long enough, one of 'em will break, or sustain damage. It's not rocket science.... but it's definitely a personal preference. My preference is not to dry fire without a snap cap, or something to absorb the firing pin impact. Suit yerselves.

    .22hustler, there is no countersink on the right side of the bolt carrier group ( in my rifles ) to receive the looped end of the firing pin retaining pin. Insertion of the retaining pin from the right side will not allow assembly of my rifles. At least not a Marine Corps rifle.... :)

    Respects....
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2011