DIY scope mounting

Discussion in 'Optics & Mounts' started by TimActual, Feb 24, 2013.

  1. TimActual

    TimActual New Member

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    Opinion on DIY, or having it professionally done. My concern is the ocular distance setting being off from one person to the next, and myself not having a inch pound torque wrench. Nightforce benchrest 8-32x56. Thanks for your thoughts.
    T.
     
  2. gearhead396

    gearhead396 New Member

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    I've done it myself and it worked ok but it didn't feel totally right. I took it to my lgs and had them mount a new scope and sight it for 60 buck its now dead on id say if your a first timer with scopes like me id get a pro to do it.
     

  3. TimActual

    TimActual New Member

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    Yeah, I'm thinking that way. I guess my concern is about parallax. But since the scope has that adjustment I imagine that shouldn't be a concern when having a 3rd party set it up?
     
  4. treehugger49

    treehugger49 New Member

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    If you don't feel comfortable doing it yourself, at least determine what eye relief works for you so that whoever does the mounting can set the scope in the appropriate spot.

    There are numerous YouTube videos on doing it yourself, and it can be done without a torque wrench.
     
  5. TimActual

    TimActual New Member

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    That's pretty much where I'm at. I was going to assemble it snug, then take it to the shop that way.

    That's going to be delayed a bit as I have to send my "new" rifle to the factory. Turns out the outfitter i bought it from sent me a used rifle with a screw broke off in the rifle's scope mount assembly and dirty action. (&*&@$). Savage Arms is paying for me to ship it to them so they can look at it. Pretty cool on Savage's part, not so cool on the place I bought it from, which was out of state.
     
  6. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My first couple of scopes were gunsmith mounted.

    After watching the smith do it, I mounted one on a .22 and it worked well, although it took a bit of effort to get the crosshairs level and the eye relief right. For the last 40 years, I've done my own.

    A scope like a Nighforce deserves a gunsmith unless you've already done several, and learned how to get it right the first try.
     
  7. TimActual

    TimActual New Member

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    Hi locutus,
    Yes, I agree. The last thing I want to do is crush my new scope. I mounted a Colt 4x scope on my CAR-15 about twenty some years ago and haven't had to touch it since other than elevation. But this one's in a different league. I've been saving for like a year to get this setup, so it's important to me to do everything right. I love my 15, it's great, but anymore all I do with it is see how far out I can hit something. So I thought I'd get something I can grow into and get serious about the sport. Hunting is not really my thing, guess I grew up in the wrong state, but I love hitting targets way out there and I'm not half bad at it. Meaning I'm only half good at it, hea. But I'm seeing some really fun times ahead. Going to have to brush up on the math it looks like. Just have to wait for my rifle to come back. It's torture waiting this long. Ten days was bad enough, but I never expected this to happen.
     
  8. cottontop

    cottontop Guest

    I have always done my own scope mounting, and I've always found it easy to do. But, because I only shoot bolt actions and single shots, bore sighting is a breeze. Just remove the bolt, look down the bore at the target, align the reticles w/ the bore and shoot. It should be somewhere on the paper. Then, fine tune the POI to where you want it. As far as actually mounting the scope on the rifle, just go about it slowly and tighten up the screws in a criss cross pattern until they are very snug without over tightening.
    ct
     
  9. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    Diy it. Gotta start somewhere. Ifyou got the moola for a nightforce br do it a favor and spring for a wheeler fat wrench. They arent that pricey.

    Your average "professional" smith will prolly look at you like you asked him to hump your grandma if you ask him about inch pound torquing scope rings or using bubble levels to properly align it to the reciever.

    Its not hard and following the directions nightforce sends on torque levels while using a fat wrench you arent going to hurt anything.
     
  10. treehugger49

    treehugger49 New Member

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    Midway USA has their "Fat Wrench" on sale through March.

    http://www.midwayusa.com/product/71...m-accurizing-torque-torque-wrench-screwdriver

    I have one, and it seems to perform OK, but I have read reviews on the internet (so it has to be true!) that their accuracy was not that great...

    hence, my comment above that a torque wrench isn't really a necessity. The proper fitting bit or screwdriver, following the directions, judicious torquing, and some Loctite® and you should be good to go.

    I have used the bubble levels to which JonM refers, and, while seemingly helpful, I'm not sure I can't get the reticle plumb just as well by eyeballing it.
     
  11. TimActual

    TimActual New Member

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    JonM, LOL. Except I am already used to getting that look from everybody, hea.

    TreeHugger... I hear ya.

    Down to it... I'm actually a half way decent mechanic I suppose, and haven't snapped a bolt off, probably in over 25 years. I guess I'm just thinking I could get the scope set up better from someone who does that kind of stuff for a living.

    Here's what it probably comes down to; The answer to the following question... When you guys mount a scope, do you generally find yourself going back and adjusting the eye relief a couple of times or more to really get it dialed in? Or is it usually spot on the first time? If the norm is to go back and adjust it a few times, then I might as well mount the thing myself since I will have to loosen it back up anyway, right? Thinking way back to my other rifle, I think it took me a few attempts to get it the way I wanted it.

    Thanks for your thoughts guys.
     
  12. nicklarimore

    nicklarimore New Member

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    I work at a lgs and install scopes quite often. The way I get the eye relief corrects install the bottom half of the rings then set on the scope. Then put the top half on and insert the screws but keeping the rings very loose. Adjust the scope to where I think the relief should be then have the customer shoulder it and see if any tweaking is necessary. After that I level the reticle (eyeball) and tighten her down in a crisscross pattern. Sometimes the scope will turn in the rings as you are tightening and throw your reticle off so go very slowly while tightening (one screw 3 turns of the screwdriver then the next).
     
  13. treehugger49

    treehugger49 New Member

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    The key in finding the proper eye relief is to mount the rifle with your eyes closed - being sure you find the sweet spot that feels right, and being able to duplicate that spot every time you bring the rifle up.

    Place the scope in the rings with enough friction to keep it from easily moving and when you can mount the rifle eyes closed, open them and not have to adjust your cheek weld to obtain the proper scope picture, then you've found the eye relief. Make small adjustments in scope position until you find that spot.

    Now you can plumb the reticle and tighten down the rings according to the manufacturer's recommendations. Once done, you shouldn't have to repeatedly mess with it again.
     
  14. TimActual

    TimActual New Member

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    Thanks guys, I appreciate all the help. I actually watched a video on-line about the eyes closed technique. That one stuck in my mind, and is the best idea in the history of mankind. Well, maybe just short of that.

    I think I'll just mount it up for eye relief and go from there. If I feel good about it I'll continue on. I'll be careful not to over tighten, then if I find it coming loose ill get a torque wrench. I'm confident that I won't snap off a screw. In fact, that's my biggest pet peeve when I work on a car where a gorilla worked on it before me.

    If this thread isn't buried by then I'll reply and let ya'all know how it went. I'm mounting the scope onto a Savage Arms model 10 BA. Which I bought after saving up for a year. Now I figure I can just buy ammo instead of retiring some day. :)
     
  15. gearhead396

    gearhead396 New Member

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    Sweet can't wait to see pics when it's mounted and ready here's a pick of my baby a mossberg atr 100 in 270 win with a 3-9x40 bushnell dusk and down
     

    Attached Files:

  16. TimActual

    TimActual New Member

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    Gearhead, I'll get some pics up once I get it back and put together. I never had a Mossberg, but I used to have a 396!
     
  17. gearhead396

    gearhead396 New Member

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    Very nice was it a second gen chevelle ss ? My all time favorite car . The pic in my avatar is under the hood of a second gen ss but the motor is a 402.
     
  18. hoovco

    hoovco New Member

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    Another thing ... To check how straight your mounting was, zero your scope, then dial like 10 minutes of elevation in. Next time you shoot, the grouping should be perfectly vertical with your first group.
     
  19. TimActual

    TimActual New Member

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    hoovco, that's very smart. I'll keep that in mind. Gearhead, mine was a 66' Caprice, dark primer gray, black vinyl top, TurboHydro 400, Holley 650, factory gauge pack on center console, and Monte Carlo highback swivel bucket seats. And me, 17 years old in 1974. Life was good.
     
  20. TimActual

    TimActual New Member

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    If anyone cares to comment on this...

    I bought my scope with the NP-R2 reticle. The application being long range target shooting and rock shooting out in the desert.

    I will most likely be using the scope to range my (known size) metal targets, perhaps even after some day being able to afford a range finder.

    For fifty bucks Nightforce will change out a reticle, and I admit I didn't do a lot of research on reticles prior to the purchase, but the NP-R2 seemed reasonable for my application.

    Just curious as to if you guys think I made the right choice. Options for my scope (8x32 56mm) are as follows:
    NP-1RR, NP-R2, NP-2DD, and MIL-DOT.

    Thanks for any opinion you may have.

    Tim