Dillinger Tests: The Kershaw Outcast

Discussion in 'Other Weapons' started by Dillinger, Jan 20, 2010.

  1. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    So, in the ongoing Blade Test Showdown, I ordered up the Kershaw Outcast after it was recommend by Francisco.

    This knife was $68 delivered to my door and one thing I can say is that it is an IMPRESSIVE piece of D2 Blade Steel!

    The edge is quite sharp, not as sharp as others I have tried, but definitely sharp enough for any chopping activities you could encounter.

    The part that really impressed me was how effing thick the back of the blade was. We are talking a little over 3/16" thick! This is one beefy blade.

    Here are some pictures before testing.
     

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    Last edited: Jan 21, 2010
  2. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    So, I was a bit short on test material after the last test, and I was between paydays, so I only have a couple of things to show you until this weekend.

    First off what a piece of cedar fence board. Cedar is not a strong wood. It's quite easily cut and split.

    Unless you go across the grain in a chopping fashion. :cool:

    As you can see, by merely holding this cedar board off the side of the bench and whacking it with this big blade, the knife just compressed the wood half way through and snapped it off without much splittering.

    This was actually kind of impressive that the wood did not shatter/splinter, it just got whacked off fairly clean.

    Check it out.
     

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    Last edited: Jan 20, 2010

  3. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    So then I got a coconut for the tests on the way home.

    One of the things I wanted to try was kind of a "glancing blow" to the top edge of a round object. You know, like a slashing "scalping" action.

    As you can see, I got the edge of the coconut and then went right into the press board that I had beneath it. :eek:

    For the follow up chop, I went more center coconut mass and just laid waste to the thing. It really was quite a short fight, except for the coconut juice that went all over the garage... LOL
     

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  4. Franciscomv

    Franciscomv New Member

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    This has been the most common complaint in the reviews I've read so far and on internet knife forums as well. IMHO, as long as the edge bevels are properly ground and all it takes is some sharpening and not actual reprofiling or grinding, I'm fine with it. Especially in knives in the sub $100 price range.

    Thanks for the pictures! In theory D2 is not very shock resistant, but as a good mate of mine likes to say "In theory communism works", it'll be interesting to see how it holds up.
     
  5. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    For less than $70, delivered, I am comfortable with the knife and it's performance.

    I have no doubt that I could sharpen this blade to beyond hair shaving sharp. The edges of the blade out of the box are even and are not rough, nor are the ground uneven down the length.

    All in all, so far, I don't have a complaint about the knife. It's performing everything asked of it and I have a few tricks still in store.

    JD
     
  6. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    Try finely slicing a tomato just for grins. ;)
     
  7. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    That's not a coconut! That's the milk bag you find after you husk a real coconut!
     
  8. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

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    That's 3/16"
     
  9. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    JD man you really should stop chewing your nails.


    Great review.
     
  10. Gojubrian

    Gojubrian New Member

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    Spitty caught it.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2010
  11. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    If you look at the bottom of the tape, it's 3/8" towards the ricasso. ;)
     
  12. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    Well?

    Why not send me a REAL coconut so I can test it with the Outcast?!?!?

    This is ALL we get up here in the PNW. :eek:

    Got more tests planned for this weekend.

    Anyone think that disassembling a pallet with a field knife is a bad idea?? :eek:

    JD
     
  13. Franciscomv

    Franciscomv New Member

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    Pallets sound like an interesting test media, watch out for nails!

    I've been spending more time on the FTF "other weapons" subforum than on dedicated knife forums lately, loads of good info on here lately.
     
  14. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    So, we got a request for tomato slicing and a second on the pallet disassembly. Anything else you guys want to see?

    I am thinking of chopping the boards on the pallet and then using the blade to pry the boards off the 2x4's in a lever action, to stress the lateral strength of the blade.

    I got a few dog bones I am going to shatter with the back faux edge to show it's bone breaking ability.

    I should probably wander off into the woods and chop a few limbs off at the tree as if I were making a lean to.

    What else?
     
  15. Franciscomv

    Franciscomv New Member

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    You can do some whittling, to see how it handles more delicate tasks. Fuzz sticks for fire starting, traps (nothing too complicated, a figure four or something like that), spoons or something like that if you're into it. While they aren't super hardcore tests they tell you a lot about the handle ergonomics and the edge geometry.

    Free hanging manila rope is another fun test. It might take a while to get the technique down but it gives you some feedback on the knive's slashing ability.

    Batoning would be good as well. It puts the blade under quite a bit of stress if hard or knotty wood is used.
     
  16. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    Updated: New Cutting

    So, I was going to do this over the weekend, but we had some household issues, not the least of which was a break in our main water line UNDER my driveway that needed to be repaired and had our house without water for a couple of days. :(

    Anyways, I got some testing done today. :)

    I was going to whack up this old pallet that I had, but when I got to getting it ready, I noticed it was supported well in the center for chopping and is the perfect height. So, it was spared the Wrath of the Outcast.

    Not so lucky was our friend the NHL Hockey puck again.

    As you can see, while the Outcast did not go all the way through in one top down strike, it did get halfway there and the puck was afixed like glue to the blade, meaning it was a narrow and deep cut.
     

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  17. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    Since it was attached to the blade, I just raised it about eye level and slapped it down on the center 2x4 of the pallet and the blade went right through.

    Now, there is a term in Structural Engineering ( someone here will know it ) that when you break the cohesive, sectional/structural, whatever density of a sphere, like the hockey puck with the missing side, it is greatly weakened. I don't know why, I just remember it from some point in my past.

    As such, I just put the pieces back up there, and with one decent overhead chop, the same as I used previously, the blade went right through the hockey puck with no problems what-so-ever.
     

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  18. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    So, the hockey puck wasn't up to much of a challenge, but what else would we encounter if we had this on our hip in a time of crisis or need??

    Well, what if you had to cut a power line, or a power line being used to secure something, in a hurry? Well, the handle is insulated rubber ( while not rated I am sure it would provide enough protection for household 120/240 voltage ).

    Here is a piece of old wire I had. It's (5) pieces of 14AWG inside a plastic coating. Not really anything major, you could go through it with your hand held cutters pretty easily, but would it damage the blade to cut it with the Outcast?? :confused:

    Uh, no. No challenge what-so-ever. I needed about a 12 inch downward strike and even that marred up the cutting surface and the Outcast made quick work of the wire.
     

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    Last edited: Jan 28, 2010
  19. Dillinger

    Dillinger New Member

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    So, how about chopping some lumber? I had an old piece of 2 x 4 treated fence material that was about 6 inches long. Pretty much worthless, except for hacking on. :D

    I turned it on it's side, so I could attack the cross grain to see how the blade would bite. In the first strike, my grip wasn't solid and the blade twisted, which created that nice little arc you see in the picture.

    Total penetration is about one inch. I would imagine if I hit something fresh, like a tree stalk, it would go much deeper. This is treated and dry wood that is also not a large enough piece that that I could secure it and get a real run at it. :rolleyes:

    With the grain was not even a challenge. Like a hot knife through butter. And finally a shot of the over penetration damage to the pallet I was using as my cutting board.

    Plenty of chop in this weapon and I haven't scratched the surface yet of things I am betting it will do. Definitely a keeper in my opinion based on the price.
     

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  20. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    That looks pretty darn good so far.