Difference between skeet, trap and clays

Discussion in 'General Shotgun Discussion' started by cva209x50, May 11, 2014.

  1. cva209x50

    cva209x50 New Member

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    What's the difference between clays, trap and skeet?

    The one I shoot is :

    One thrower set up next to me with the clays flying away from me at about a 45 to 50 degree angle.

    My record is 12 in a row.
     
  2. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

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    Skeet is when the clays are thrown from one side or the other, high coming down or low going up. (From a high house or a low house.)

    Trap is when the clay is thrown going away from you but not side to side.

    The clays are the flying targets.

    I'm just learning this stuff myself. You are certainly much better at it than I am. LOL
     

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  3. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Sporting clays has a much closer resemblance to hunting.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sporting_clays

    Last time I shot a round of sporting clays, I used a Remington 1100 Light Field in .410. I got 50% and was REAL proud of that! It has been said that Sporting Clays was created to teach humility. I agree!
     
  4. indy36

    indy36 New Member

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    Skeet, Trap, Sporting Clays, and 5-Stand are all distinctly different games. The length of your shot, the angle of your shot, the chokes used, etc aren't the same in each. The Internet will tell you everything you need to know. I shoot 95% skeet so I'm partial to that. I didn't like trap. I love 5-Stand but the closest place to shoot it to me is over an hour away. I've never shot sporting clays but I will. It's the golf of shotgun games. You walk around for 2 hours stopping along the way to shoot various targets and you'll shoot a lot more shells than a round of trap or skeet.


    Sent from my iPhone using Firearms Talk
     
  5. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

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    Oops. Thanks for correcting me. I was obviously unaware. :eek:

    That's pretty damned good for shooting it with a .410. Both times I've shot at Bobski's I use a .410 and I actually hit some clays AND I didn't come in last. Next time I'm going to be shooting my very own youth model 20 gauge.
     
  6. cva209x50

    cva209x50 New Member

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    So if I have the thrower set to chuck clays in the same direction every time, it's trap?
     
  7. cva209x50

    cva209x50 New Member

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    Those little youth 20 gauge shotguns are loud. I still have my youth 870 express 20 gauge and it's louder than my a300 Beretta 12 gauge. I looked it up online and a 20 gauge shotgun with a 28" barrel is 1 decibel louder than a 12 gauge shotgun with the same length barrel. :confused:
     
  8. Virginian

    Virginian Active Member

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    Just how did you get that from the responses? What you are doing is shooting clay pigeons. Some call it pasture clays. It is not a registered form of shotgun sport, but it is fun.
     
  9. cva209x50

    cva209x50 New Member

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    OK. but from a "regulated" standpoint, it's trap, right?
     
  10. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    It's a guy in a field having fun, nothing more or nothing less.

    That is why you wear hearing protection unless you want to be deaf at the age of 50. Get a nice set of ear muffs. The ear plugs are OK in a pinch but they don't offer the same level of protection. You can get a decent pair of ear muffs at walmart for $20. It's the best $20 you will ever spend.
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2014
  11. indy36

    indy36 New Member

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    ImageUploadedByFirearms Talk1399855647.105738.jpg

    Trap is a game where you shoot clays going away from you. They come out of the central trap house and move away from you from low to high. The trap moves left and right inside the house and sends birds out within a defined arc. So, they might come out a little left or straight or a little right. See the picture. The trap shooter stands on the line and takes turns shooting in that line, then rotate to the next station. So, in general, shots taken going away from you are 'trap-ish' in nature. Skeet is a game of side to side shots with nothing going directly away from you.


    Sent from my iPhone using Firearms Talk
     
  12. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    Stations 1 & 7 in skeet have clays going directly away from you. You stand under the tower at station 1 and right beside the tower at station 7.
     
  13. indy36

    indy36 New Member

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    If you get technical, then yes, station 1 and 7 have outgoing shots...BUT, they come from behind you and one is falling and one is rising. Trap does not present either of those shots. In trap the trap house is 16 yards in front of you.


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    Last edited: May 11, 2014
  14. deg

    deg Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    The only other thing I might add is 5-Stand is somewhat similar to Sporting Clay's.

    If your ever in the Tulsa area reach out and if I am open, I will treat you to a good taste of all of them.
     
  15. Balota

    Balota ... but I used to play keyboards.

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    If you can find a range with a combined field (both trap and skeet on same field), you can run "Poor Man's 5-Stand". The thrower randomly chooses High House, Low House or Trap (with 3 random directions). We have fun with that at the FTF Shoot & Hoots. Next one is in October if any are interested!
     
  16. Balota

    Balota ... but I used to play keyboards.

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    No, trap machines randomize among 3 trajectories: left, straight and right. To make it more interesting you shoot trap from a series of locations behind the trap house.
     
  17. Balota

    Balota ... but I used to play keyboards.

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    Actually, you will get better noise reduction from a good set of earplugs. With muffs you run the risk of displacing them as you get your cheek weld. Earplugs (properly inserted) can provide 32-33 dBA reduction. Most muffs (especially the fancy electronic ones) run about 24-25 dBA.

    Most people do not insert plugs properly. That can lead to the mistaken impression that plugs don't work very well.

    Roll them into a thin tube. Insert deeply into the ear canal before it expands back to size. The tube should go entirely into the ear canal. Hold the plug in place until it has expanded to fill the ear canal. If you see any more than the "top" surface of the plug extending beyond the ear canal, you have not inserted the tube far enough. You will notice a big reduction in surrounding noise as the plug expands. Repeat for the other ear.

    People with some hearing damage already may be well advised to use both plugs and muffs. Hearing damage is permanent.
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2014
  18. tonydewar

    tonydewar New Member

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    no no no no no
     
  19. tonydewar

    tonydewar New Member

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    no you need to be at least 16 yds behind the thrower to start with
     
  20. cva209x50

    cva209x50 New Member

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    I use the ear pro sonic defenders by surefire. I use the 26nrr passives. I'm noise sensitive and I can shoot just about anything if I use those plugs. I can hear footsteps out to 40 yards and normal conversation out to 8 yards.