Deer hunting caliber

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by drugan, Jan 6, 2012.

  1. drugan

    drugan New Member

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    I am moving to new England and want to get a Rifle for deer hunting. Any recommendations would be great.
     
  2. jeepejeep

    jeepejeep New Member

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    You can never go wrong with a 30'06 IMHO. If you need/want fast follow up shots there are some semi-auto's and my favorite the Remington 7600 pump.
     

  3. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    Jeep is right! One of the best all around versatile hunting rifle is without a doubt the 30-06. And in your area the 308 cal is also a good choice. Both have ammunition readily accessible from any store from Wal-Mart to small mom and pop shops. And the 30-06 is good from lighter grain bullets for varmints to heavy bullets for example Brown Bear! You can find a good rifle in either caliber at a reasonable price and usually there are a lot of great used ones out there also. A lot of them were purchased with good intentions to hunt with. In reality they are sighted in shot a little at first and live in the gun safe the rest of the time!

    03
     
  4. TruggieTex

    TruggieTex New Member

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    Just to add my remedial thoughts and observations on deer sized game calibers:

    Thick woods 30-30, 30-06
    Open distance shot .243, .270, 30-06
    Crazy distance 7mm mag, 300 winmag

    Once again, just what I have seen at camp. Any above will work, as will many others. The most important factor is your comfort with the rifle...have seen many hunters that are awkward with their firearms.
     
  5. Jeepergeo

    Jeepergeo New Member

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    30-06 is my vote too. If you can afford several rifles, then yes, by all means, maybe go with 30-06, 30-30, 243. But if you get just one, the classic 30-06 is a good all round cartridge.
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2012
  6. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    Moving to New England is a broad term. Most of Eastern Ma, and Southern NH are shotgun only. Are you talking Franconia notch, or deep in the Green Mountains? Then a light shorter range rifle will be perfect. Most of the deer harvested up here are at less then 100 yards. Popular calibers, .32 Special, .30-30, .243, 7mm08, .308, .270, .30-06. There are many guys that use muzzle loaders all season long. They are exempt in shotgun only areas, so the really can be a great way to go. There are very few places that you can find a shot that is over 120 yards. There are plenty of rifles in Metric, or odd calibers that would work great. The .257 Roberts is one. If you are close to Southern/mid NH, let me know. I can help you out.
     
  7. 66ford352fe

    66ford352fe New Member

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    Claymores are beautiful.
     
  8. 303tom

    303tom Well-Known Member

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    Thirty-aught-six..................
     
  9. Georgiahunter

    Georgiahunter New Member

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    I have a .308. Most responses will be either .30-06 or whichever caliber that person owns.
     
  10. cottontop

    cottontop Guest

    If you are new to hunting and shooting your best bet would be a .243, and then learn to shoot it accurately. Many years ago, Jack O'Conner did an extensive research project on "brush" guns. He found that any bullet, now matter how big and slow could be deflected by brush. He right away recommended that a hunter use a smaller caliber that he/she could shoot accurately and try to shoot through openings in the brush and not try to plow through it. The .243 is plenty suitable for deer, it is light to carry through brush, and it has little recoil, which will enable you to be more accurate.
    cottontop
     
  11. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    The problem w/ brush is if you use a scope, the focal point is past the twigs, so it is very possible to look through the scope and think you have a clear shot when you actually have quite a bit of obstruction. I'm adding some pics from my ride back from Barre Vt. this morning. The woods here are thick!!!


    This open area is a pond!
    [​IMG]
     
  12. cottontop

    cottontop Guest

    deer rifle


    This may be true, but the fact remains that any bullet or rifle combination you might use can still be deflected by brush.
    cottontop
     
  13. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    I'd go 30.06, but that's what I'd do, not what to do...
     
  14. drugan

    drugan New Member

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    To clarify I am moving to ct. But I will be hunting all over from Ohio to Maine. Oh and I already have a 50 cal muzzle loader and a 12 gauge
     
  15. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    i like the 30-06 just because it is a proven performer and if you don't reload, factory ammo selection is the best in that caliber. also the 30-06 is pretty much a very versatile caliber for anywhere in North America. i you owned only one centerfire caliber, this would be at the top of my list for consideration. more rifles are factory chambered for it, factory ammo selection in various weights and a proven over a 100 year history behind it, you just can't wrong with the 30-06.
     
  16. powg

    powg New Member

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    the perfect all around caliber ....and rifle

    Ive always been one not follow the ''norm '' here in east tx where most hunt with bolt actions and the 270 is very popular . I have imo the perfect rifle ..remington pump 7600 in .308. super accurate 1st shot with fast follow -ups if needed....really never needed ! Ive made it more utility friendly with a tactical pistol grip stock and hi capacity mags for zombies or brainwashed representatives of a gov't gone nuts . the .308 will do it all any animal, 2 or 4 legged in north america.
     
  17. RaySendero

    RaySendero Member

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    IMO, In the US, If you'll find the best deer rifle to fit your hunt situation -
    One of these four cartridges will work:
    30/30
    308 Win
    270 Win or
    30/06

    !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  18. Shoobee

    Shoobee New Member

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    GeorgiaHunter is a great psychologist!

    You can shoot a deer with anything, and eventually it will fall down. Only question is when and where?

    If you want it to drop in its tracks, then you need to go with a .270 at least.

    And note that a .308 and a .30-30 are both lighter guns than a .270. You need to look at the powder charge, not just the bullet calibre.

    Guns that would drop a deer in its tracks include the .270, the 7mm mag, the .30-06, and any of the bigger magnums.

    With a .308 or .30-30 or .243 or anything lighter you are going to be searching for your deer, so you better get good at following blood trails, and carry some long rope with you in the jeep in case it barrels into a ravine.

    Personally for New England I would not recommend my own gun. It is designed for deer AND elk. And no elk up there.
     
  19. Gunner17202

    Gunner17202 New Member

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    Don't sell the Remington .260 short, maybe the perfect whitetail round.
     
  20. cottontop

    cottontop Guest

    deer cartridge


    You will go searching for your deer hit with any caliber if the shot placement is not good. The .308 and the .30-06 are almost identical. The bigger magnums are really overkill for deer. They are not that big nor hard to bring down. The .30-30 should not even be mentioned in the same sentence as the .243 or .308. The .30-30 was originally a black powder round and is still loaded to not near the pressures of the .308 or .243. Also, the .30-30 is loaded with flat or round nose bullets. Any long range potential for it is not there. The average hunter would be much better off with a smaller caliber; i.e., the .243, 7mm-08, .260, or .250 Savage and then he/she should learn to shoot it accurately. A properly placed bullet by any of these calibers will bring down a deer with no problem.
    cottontop