Dedicated Prescription Shooting Glasses Advice?

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by Vikingdad, Jan 31, 2012.

  1. Vikingdad

    Vikingdad New Member

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    I went in to the eye doctor today because my eyes are just not what they used to be. I went to the range on Friday and had trouble making out the bullseye at 100 yards (I have always had excellent vision) so I was more concerned with the shooting aspect of my life than anything else (although I do use over-the-counter reading glasses when working on the bench up close.)

    Anyhow, my vision isn't too bad and the doctor suggested that I bring a couple of rifles in to the office so they can better see what the visual requirements are with iron sights and a scope (I use both). I am considering the idea, but the glasses would be specific for shooting only, as she described it. I am going to make a trip to the range first specifically to note all of my related shooting habits (I couldn't nail them down in her office) so that if I do bring my rifles in to the office I will be able to do everything that I do at the range.

    My question for Y'all is, if you wear corrective glasses at the range and you could design the "perfect" pair, how would you design them? I am leaning towards the amber lenses (I have used them when hunting and they help make things sharper in daylight).

    I have seen those devices that you stick to your glasses that sharpen the sight picture like this one http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/pid=8767/Product/DELUXE-OPTICAL-ATTACHMENT
    Anybody use these?
     
  2. Belltactical

    Belltactical New Member

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    Yeah, I'm blind as a bat since the day I turned 40. The apertures you are talking about basically do what squinting does - collimate the light tighter which brings things into focus (at least that is how it was explained to me). I just use safety glasses, that is prescription glasses made from a tough polymer. Most opticians know about them or can look them up. The downside is they scratch easily. Yellow for some reason seems to be my color of choice. I go through about 3/4 pairs a year shooting every day.
     

  3. Vikingdad

    Vikingdad New Member

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    Yeah, that little aperture device seems like a gimmick, especially at $60 a pop. I don't shoot every day but I try to go at least once a week. These glasses would be strictly for range use. I still have good vision I just can't spot the fly on a hog's arse at 100 yards like I used to. And the bullseye is not clear from 100 yards through a sight aperture.
     
  4. scottybaccus

    scottybaccus New Member

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    I wear prescription lenses, always have. I don't wear a specific safety type product because I have found them quite expensive, and I don't shoot every day. I tend to buy polycarbonate lenses with anti-glare coatings, polarized if tinted for sun glasses. The sunglasses help a lot in daylight, but my clear lenses are best under artificial light.

    Now before anyone gets irked about standard eye wear versus safety eye wear, I do work in an enviroment where protective eye wear is sometimes required, though not at a level where face shields and such would be. By our company standards, which are OSHA compliant, standard shatterproof eyewear meets the required criteria. I have also shot in competition and on many different ranges. I have never been challenged on the specification of my glasses. They do not look at all like safety glasses. While side shields would be nice sometimes, I am comfortable with the coverage.
     
  5. Vikingdad

    Vikingdad New Member

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    My most frequent shooting buddy (other than my sons) wears not-quite Coke-bottle glasses and nobody ever challenges him as to their effectiveness as safety glasses. Heck, they're near 1/4 inch thick!

    Any glasses I get would be polycarbonate, as most are these days, which probably do qualify under ANSI as "safety glasses".
     
  6. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    I would find out how to avoid getting natural facial oils from clouding the lens corners near the nose bridge.

    Also, as they are shooting glasses, cleaning may be in the background for now. Use water and a soft cotton or terry towel that does not have any fabric softener. Paper towels are too rough and have scratched lenses. Never wipe the lenses with a t-shirt and always rinse with a fluid first to wash dust away.
     
  7. Jay

    Jay New Member

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    For general range or target/match shooting, ths sky's the limit. Wear whatever suits you. For personal protection training/practice, use what you wear for every day activities. If you should get into a self defense shooting scenario, you won't have time to change yer glasses.

    Whatever works for ya :)
     
  8. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    Ive got frames with quick change lenses. My glasses guy did the same thing he had me bring in a couple of guns and noted what part of the lens i was looking through and ground them to fit.

    Ive got lens for rifle coated tinted yellow that dim in bright light. Ive got yellow tinted pistol lenses and red tented shotgun lenses.

    You eye girl can tell where the focal point is just by you holding your shooting pose. Highly recomend it for prescription shooters!!
     
  9. scottybaccus

    scottybaccus New Member

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    That's interesting. My biggest issue with my glasses is that I don't like the focus in particular zones of my vision when shooting scoped rifles. I am actually moving to scout mount configurations because I see optics better with my glasses when they are at arm's length. I am also practicing two eyes open a lot more with these optics and it's paying off.
     
  10. Vikingdad

    Vikingdad New Member

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    You pretty much had me until you said this. She is a Doctor of Optometry. I find it difficult enough to concentrate on the concerns I have with my eyes without noticing that she is a very attractive woman. Probably young enough to be my daughter to be sure, but nevertheless.:eek:

    Where was I? Oh yes, my eyes. And shooting glasses. The glasses you talk about sound very expensive. I mean they sound great and all but how much do they cost?
     
  11. jrags

    jrags New Member

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    Has anyone tried the prescription inserts for:

    1. Rudy project
    2. Wiley X
    3. Revision
    4. ESS
    5. Oakley

    They all seem to make prescription inserts for shooting specific safety glasses. And you can change the tint lenses as you wish without messing with the prescription. And should you need a new prescription, just get new inserts made. Just use the same old tint lenses fine.
     
  12. AleksiR

    AleksiR New Member

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    I've got prescription inserts for my ESS ICE glasses. The inserts work ok, but weren't really made that good. They're ok for close range stuff, but I prefer using contact lenses. I've been thinking about getting new ones made by someone who actually specializes in shooting glasses, but the contacts have served me well so far.
     
  13. johnbrowning

    johnbrowning New Member

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    Try using night sights, comes in different colors and at least you can make out your sights then find your target
     
  14. Mason609

    Mason609 New Member

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    I had Wiley X prescription goggles when I was in Iraq. They were ok, we were issued revision but I didn't like the prescription inserts. In Afghanistan, I had ESS Ice issued to me (though, I prefer the Crossbow, the Ice insert works in these). My Platoon Leader has prescription Oakleys and loved them.

    Basically, it's all a matter of what feels better on you, and how much you are willing to spend. I still have my Wiley X goggles, use them occasionally. I have my ESS Ice and Crossbow that I swap out.
     
  15. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I was having problems and went in for a new prescription but it turned out to be a cataract. I had to have surgery to replace the lens.
     
  16. JD1969

    JD1969 New Member

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  17. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Active Member

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    Walmart Optical is by far the cheapest price for prescription safety glasses.We are required to wear safety glasses 100% of the time in the oilfield.I have a pair of clear and dark lens safety glasses.I think I paid like $68 a pair for them,and insurance covered all of that.
    I had Lenscrafters make me a pair several years ago,and they charged about $300 for them.