Decrimping military brass

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by blucoondawg, Mar 28, 2012.

  1. blucoondawg

    blucoondawg New Member

    1,178
    0
    0
    I found a decent price on 5.56 brass polished with spent primer still in, what do you guys use to remove the primer crimp without cutting too deep into the pocket?
     
  2. JonM

    JonM Moderator

    20,110
    12
    38
    I ise a dillon super swage. Unfortunately ive needed to use it on federal and winchester brass. It does an amazing job making primer holes uniform without tearing them up.
     

  3. rjd3282

    rjd3282 New Member

    3,852
    0
    0
    I use the RCBS case prep center.
     
  4. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

    11,380
    1
    0
    I use the RCBS primer pocket swager. Fits in standard press and does a very good job of pressing the metal back to its original place. You can adjust it from just removing the crimp to giving a slight flare to ease reinsertion of the new primer.
     
  5. blucoondawg

    blucoondawg New Member

    1,178
    0
    0
    Do you have any trouble with it deforming the case rims? I have heard this to be an issue with the press mounted swagers. That Dillon looks like the ticket but I wanna try to avoid layin down another 100 bucks on a piece of equipment.
     
  6. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

    11,380
    1
    0
    No problem at all. The case is supported by a rod that goes inside the case to the base. Rim never has any contact.
     
  7. sniper762

    sniper762 New Member

    644
    0
    0
    try lee's military brass decapper and primer pocket reamer
     
  8. Snakedriver

    Snakedriver New Member

    848
    0
    0
    I personally like using the the Hornady pocket reamer in my Lyman case trimmer to remove the crimp. I tried swaging the crimp out with the RCBS kit, but I never could get it to work well enough. The good news is that the crimp only needs to be removed one time.

    The way the reamer is built it stops you from going too deep and removing too much material from the primer pocket edge.
     
  9. randyjarrett

    randyjarrett New Member

    6
    0
    0
    Years ago I guess we poor boyed it, but all this new stuff probably wasn't out yet. My Dad show me how to use a small punch and set the case over a hole in a heavy piece of metal, that has a hole in it big enough for the primer to fall thru, and we just punched out the primers. We did a lot of live primers because a primer will not go off if punched backward.Then we took a drill bit the size we needed and beveled the primer pocket so the new primers would fit right in the case.

    PS Besure if you are doing live primers they are over the hole because if not they will go off if hit backward on a hard surface, like right beside hole.

    Randy
     
  10. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

    11,380
    1
    0
    I beg to differ with you. A primer WILL go off if hit from the wrong end, especially if a crimped primer. You can drive the anvil into the cup and set it off just as it would if you drove the cup into the anvil.

    Trust me, I have the scars to prove it.
     
  11. Dan308

    Dan308 New Member

    290
    0
    0
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2012
  12. linuxuser3890

    linuxuser3890 New Member

    279
    0
    0
    I second this motion. Lol

    I use my deburr tool for these cases when accuracy is not a huge concern because it is fast.

    Sent from my Inspire 4G using FirearmsTalk
     
  13. alsaqr

    alsaqr Well-Known Member Supporter

    6,127
    113
    63
    A case deburring tool in the drill press works great.
     
  14. Dan308

    Dan308 New Member

    290
    0
    0
    yeah you don't need to de-burr much. Just enough for the primer not to get hung up on the lip.
     
  15. BLKRIFLE

    BLKRIFLE New Member

    14
    0
    0
    I'll go along with JonM. I buy pulled or once fired military brass in 223 and 30-06. I deprime them and I bought a Dilllon super swage 600 and it is worth the money. If you are going to reload a lot of millitary brass I recommend you get one. There are others that you can get but IMO this is the best.
     
  16. cakesterkiller

    cakesterkiller New Member

    257
    0
    0
    get the right tools cause I've done with a case trimmer by hand and it is excruciating
     
  17. Shade

    Shade New Member

    1,720
    0
    0
    All the swagers are nice.

    The cheapest method is place a reamer or chamfer tool in drill press and
    ream the pocket, fast, quick and easy. Set the drill press on the lowest
    rpm setting available. A light touch on each case is all that is needed.
     
  18. billt

    billt New Member

    1,642
    0
    0
    I have and use both the RCBS press mounted unit and the Dillon Super Swage 600. Admittingly after I purchased the Dillon, the RCBS unit pretty much sits. The Dillon Super Swage works very fast and really does a good job in removing the heaviest of primer crimps. Well worth the $100.00. I've decrimped thousands of cases with it.