dated food

Discussion in 'Survival & Sustenance Living Forum' started by purehavoc, Jan 8, 2012.

  1. purehavoc

    purehavoc New Member

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    So the wife and I were grocery shopping today and I kept picking up mostly canned stuff and or dry goods to see how long of a expiration date they all had . To my disbelief a cooked canned ham had a exp date of 12/2017 . All I could say was wow 5 yrs ????. Most dry goods had a 1 yr shelf life but some stuff had a 2-3 yr shelf life , Most of the white rice I looked at had a 1-1.5 yr shelf life , Now I know that most of this stuff if kept cool and dry will out last the date on the packaging by many years especially if you pack it in vaccum packaging . My wife thinks Im crazy , but some day she will thank me for what Im doing .Some of it I hide from her as I just prefer she not know what exactly we do have , I figure if she doesnt know neither will anyone she knows :)
     
  2. partdeux

    partdeux Well-Known Member

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    Properly sealed, it will go decades. There was actually some 100 year old food that was tested and while nutritional value was lacking, it was perfectly safe. I'm hearing from people that can, if it's done right, the food still tastes great several years later.
     

  3. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    MRE's, the last I heard they were inspected after being in storage for 7 years or something like that.

    It's a little off topic (only slightly) but my point is, some food can last seemingly forever.
     
  4. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    mre_storage_chart.jpg

    Yes, canned food can go a REAL long time.

    MRE's- well, check the chart.
     
  5. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    I figured the Marine corps would serve me food that was well past its shelf life...
     
  6. ellis36

    ellis36 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I was in the Navy in the fifties, and I remember the dates on cases of cold-storage eggs being early forties. Once in a while one would be bad---they would just scrape it off the griddle. :)
     
  7. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    US Army- late 60's, we had C Rations that were from the end of WW 2. Back then, the accessory pack had a mini-pack of 5 cigarettes. Chesterfield or Old Golds- non-filter, so dry that when you took a drag, half the tobacco came out.
     
  8. dragunovsks

    dragunovsks New Member

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    Ive eaten mres from the 80's, not sure the exact year but my dad would pack them for camping trips when i was younger (i was born in '84, my dad was indiana national guard from '83 to about 2000). They were in olive drab bags with black lettering. The Hersheys chocolate bar was rock hard.
     
  9. adjusterr

    adjusterr New Member

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    dated food Reply to Thread

    Properly canned food, whether commercial or home, will last 10-15 plus years. Always make sure the lid or top of the container is concave or flat, any container with a domed or convex lid should be disposed of without opening. The dates on most food are " Best if used by" which is nothing more than a marketing ploy. Canned food does not suddenly go bad when a certain date is reached. The nutritional value will slowly diminish over many years but the food will still be good.Obviously, perishable food, milk, meat etc will be dated and these items should be used within the indicated time period.
     
  10. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

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    Here's my personal story of 'eating outdated food'.

    I was cleaning out some food shelves in the basement. There was a can of soup that was dated "June 06". Well, it was only August so I thought it was just a couple months outdated. It was Campbell's Tomato Soup and I brought it to work and had it for dinner that night. It tasted just a little 'off' but not bad, really. While I was eating it, it occurred to me the date on the can was NOT Month/Day.....but Month/Year. I was eating soup that was 4 years overdue. I lived to tell about it.......and laugh at myself.

    Though I think when storing food for 'the long haul' it is best to continually rotate the stock. Use the older stuff and replace it with fresher stuff regularly.
     
  11. purehavoc

    purehavoc New Member

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    I can tell you this for Ramen noodles, for having really little to no nutritional value a person can live a long time on them . I ate them for breakfast , lunch and dinner for about 3 months after my Ex left me with nothing but a recliner, 12" TV , 6 packs of ramen noodles and plastic silverware . I would think these would last a long time but the date on them was around 1.5 yr sell by date , maybe thats from the terrible packaging they come in . Either way were stocked up on some of those also :D if I made it that long on them Im sure they wont kill us now , Except for the sodium in them
    Looks ilke I need to invest in some more plastic 5 gal buckets to start keeping more stuff in
     
  12. jyo

    jyo New Member

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    Several times I have eaten canned food that was 7-8 years old (could have been older) and was surprised that it looked and tasted just fine---these were stored in a cool-dry place. I have only encountered one can (pineapple slices) that was grossly swollen and clearly gone bad. Thru it away---now regret not taking a picture first.
     
  13. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

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    The acid in the canned pineapple will 'age' the can after a while. I had a can of pineapple chunks waaay in the back of the shelf. When I finally did some digging around on that shelf, the can was sitting in a pool of black, very sticky stuff. I had to soak it to loosen the can and clean off the gunk. :eek:
     
  14. Marlinman

    Marlinman New Member

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    Good old c-rats....NOT!!! And i have eattin some pretty nasty MRE's in the Marines also trip

    God didnt make all men equal colonel Sam Colt did
     
  15. Marlinman

    Marlinman New Member

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    Do you still have your p38 can opener c3? Also how was them green eggs??

    God didnt make all men equal colonel Sam Colt did
     
  16. willshoum

    willshoum New Member

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    Shelf life.........

    A few years back we opened a few cans of chedder cheese that were given to me from a war vet.... Now thats what I call aged.....WW two..... it was a little dry but very good on crackers........:)
     
  17. Shoobee

    Shoobee New Member

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    I prefer to store rice & noodles (some people call this pasta, and its the only Italian word they know) & bottled water, as my main food storage supply, which I also rotate through my meals during the year, so that it never sits more than a year on the shelf.

    Canned foods are generally ok, but they could be bad, and you would never know it. The poison is called botulism. You can google it, or wiki it, and read all about it. It can affect anything in a can. Doesn't matter how old.

    Generally I avoid canned foods. And I definitely do not store them. As to their shelf life, if properly processed, everything inside has been sterized, so the carbohydrate value should last forever, whereas the vitamin and protein value could quickly degrade. The point being, you can store carbs in the form of rice and noodles, and be perfectly safe that way.

    For some recipes, canned ingredients are very convenient, such as spaghetti sauces, apple sauce, sliced pineapple, etc. You could make your own from fresh ingredients, but the canned product is much easier and quicker to use.

    Every time you do something on this Earth, you are normally taking some kind of risk. And some risks are totally unnecessary. Any risk that you can avoid is an unnecessary risk. Any risk that you cannot avoid, you are stuck with.

    To avoid food-borne disease risk, I normally cook with fresh ingredients, but I do store some items, although not many. Rice and noodles are virtually always safe.

    The 4 food groups as taught when I was growing up are meat, vegies, carbs, and fruits. You could can and store all of them, but they taste better when you make and eat them fresh. To these 4 groups I like to add a generous serving of gravy and wine. So that makes 6 food groups, for me. The wine is good for making gravy (some people call this sauce) too.

    Wine can be safely stored for decades, fortunately.
     
  18. Shoobee

    Shoobee New Member

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    Win-dy, it looks like you have a .22 and a .38 in your handgun photo.

    The .22 looks like a Ruger or a Colt. I have had both, and they are good guns. If you are a really good shot, you can bag most any squirrels, rabbits, possums, or coons with them. And those all taste pretty good to eat. Squirrels and rabbits taste like chicken, and possums and coons taste like pork. So it makes sense to store .22 ammo, since you have the perfect gun for it.

    That then would take care of the meat for your 4 food groups, if need be.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2012
  19. Shoobee

    Shoobee New Member

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    USMC mid 1970s, we had C rats that were from the end of Viet Nam. Could have been the same ones you were eating back then also. Used to barter with the smokers with the cigarettes in exchange for their jam and crackers.

    Glad I was young and dumb back then. I would have eaten anything, and believed anything, once upon a time.
     
  20. Shoobee

    Shoobee New Member

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    Ramen noodles and the broth mix that comes with them are the perfect backpacking food. Lite weight, cooks fast, just add hot water.

    Around the house I prefer to make real noodles though. Flat egg noodles cook quickly, if you are in a hurry, and taste infinitely better than ramen noodles. I prefer to save the ramen noodles for the outdoors.