Dangers of Reloading

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by JayCody, Sep 24, 2013.

  1. JayCody

    JayCody New Member

    315
    0
    0
    I have always wanted to get Into reloading but I am concerned about accidentally loading a hot round and hurting myself or others. Is this something I should look past and start reloading. Or does it happen often?
     
  2. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

    7,236
    0
    0
    So far Fox television could never make a show with me in it called "When loads go bad"

    You just have to understand the concept, and myself I visually inspect the powder levels of all cartridges before I seat the bullet. (I single stage press reload) and by following the books have never had any kind of round mishap. and remember, an underloaded rifle round is as dangerous as an overloaded pistol round.
     

  3. Rocky7

    Rocky7 New Member

    1,409
    0
    0
    Buy at least one good reloading manual, such as Sierra, Nosler, etc. and follow the instructions religiously. Ignore all the: "You don't have to [insert stupid idea here] and you'll be fine.

    It is a fascinating and rewarding hobby.

    ps: Add Anna's advice (which you won't find in manuals). Likewise, I always look to make sure there is powder in the case before I seat a bullet. A squib load is real dangerous. It's easy enough to avoid if you know to simply have a look before seating a bullet.
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2013
  4. JayCody

    JayCody New Member

    315
    0
    0
    So perhaps im concerned because all my local shooting ranges have signs with exploded firearms and text that says "No Reloads"
     
  5. JayCody

    JayCody New Member

    315
    0
    0
    Do any of you all know of a good reloading press to start with? I'm looking for something very inexpensive so I don't have to commit to reloading if its not my thing.
     
  6. Rocky7

    Rocky7 New Member

    1,409
    0
    0
    I would suggest that you avoid cheap. I did that at the start, ended up selling it for next to nothing and bought better. If you start with, say, the RCBS Supreme Master Reloader kit, you'll spend a bit more up front but if you don't like it, you'll have many takers for that kit and at a fair price to you. You might even find a good reloading kit like that 2nd hand?

    If need be, take a second job for a month to avoid going cheap.

    No comment on your shooting range signs - I've never seen such a sign up here. IMO, such a sign would be written by a drooler.
     
  7. 25-5

    25-5 New Member

    3,302
    1
    0
    That is because there are idiots that ruin a good thing. Also it may be insurance. If you like to text and drive, don't reload.
    Most ranges don't have such restrictions, or I would not have been reloading for forty years.
    Previous posts are correct. Just watch your steps checking along the way.
     
  8. JayCody

    JayCody New Member

    315
    0
    0
    Thanks for the help
     
  9. DrumJunkie

    DrumJunkie New Member

    4,823
    0
    0
    You pay attention to what you are doing and do the right research and you will not have a "hot load" problem. It's really that simple. Get a couple reloading guides. Look up load data on the net as well. Look what companies that make components say is a proper load. Like you use powder A and slug B this is the proper load and the pressure to be expected.
    Every time I've seen first hand a problem with reloaded ammo it was because the one doing it was not paying attention. When I'm making ammo I don't talk to people, I don't have a TV on, all I do is make ammo. I take breaks after a predetermined number of rounds and I go over the press settings after so many rounds (usually 250-350). I take measurements of ammo to make sure the slug is in the right place...Not too deep or not enough...
    I don't like being in someone else's reloading room when they are working either. It's a distraction to the one making ammo. And I'm not going to help someone make a mistake.
    When I'm on a break I leave the reloading room entirely. Take a walk around the house or outside. Taking ten minutes or so every now and then helps keep me fresh and clears my head some.

    Doing this I make thousands of rounds at a time and have yet to have a problem with the first one. I'm kind of lazy so when I get to where I want or need to make rounds I make a lot!
     
  10. Pasquanel

    Pasquanel Proud to be an American Supporter

    1,923
    147
    63
    Never start at max or near max loads as already advised Rocky7 follow the recipe exactly!
    You're dealing with very high pressures and simply changing the brand of cases can increase them dramatically, especially if your loading near the high end.
    A little attention to detail and a little common sense and you've entered into a new dimension, one I expect you will enjoy immensely!
     
  11. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

    7,236
    0
    0
    Any single stage press will do. With just the press, dies, and a scale, (this doenst have to be a digital expensive scale just a basic accurate balance scale made for reloading will do), I can show you how to do it on a budget.
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2013
  12. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

    7
    1
    0
    as the others have made some good suggestions and lots of good advice, i will say this, start by buy the the book, "The ABC's of Reloading" very informative book with lots of info for the starting reloader. explains the reloading process and the safe practices when reloading. safety is paramount.

    safe reloading is about following safe procedures and following safe practices. attention to detail is very important. following load data is very important. overcharges, and undercharges can be very dangerous. me, i let the experts experiment with new loads. i'll follow my load data books.

    reloading is a very safe and rewarding aspect of shooting and somethin i enjoy that adds lots of interest and pleasure to my shooting experiances. relaoding is very safe if done safely and correctly, following the procedures that promote safe reloading. it can be very dangerous for you and others if you don't follow the safety procedures. they are there for a good reason, to keep you safe.
     
  13. rockratt

    rockratt Active Member Lifetime Supporter

    2,158
    0
    36
    I started with a single stage press back in the early 90s and still use it today. I can't imagine shooting and not reloading. Buy you some equipment and get started!!!!!!!
     
  14. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

    6,489
    0
    0
    I see you are seeking parts for Russian rifles. You are not concerned about the safety of a 100 year old communist designed rifle built by slave labor. But you are afraid to reload? :rolleyes:
     
  15. JayCody

    JayCody New Member

    315
    0
    0
    True...
    alright time to bite the bullet and start reloading
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 25, 2013
  16. JayCody

    JayCody New Member

    315
    0
    0
  17. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

    7,236
    0
    0
    If you know how to solder, you can also use a metal spoon just as easy. Or you can be like nightstalker suggests in my thread and spend the money and buy a set :eek:
     
  18. gr8oldguy

    gr8oldguy New Member

    1,115
    0
    0
    Reloading is a great hobby and as crazy as things are you can still save money by reloading. I have been reloading for years. Everything you are concerned about, you should be concerned about. I find it relaxing, but at the same time it requires total concentration. I have a very strict process that I use, and I'm sure most hand loaders have their own. I never vary from my process. You'll find what works for you. Get a good book and start slow. good luck
     
  19. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

    6,489
    0
    0
    The press and tools depend mostly on your mechanical aptitude. If you feel comfortable with a multi-tool head get a turret.. The turret head press is simply a C-Press witch holds all your dies for a round. These can be very productive as you proceed through reloading.
    If you plan on doing mostly large brass look at a more powerful CO-AX press. Buy good equipment don't get too carried away on budget purchases. These are tools for the rest of your life.:)