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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello there,
since I am getting into gunsmithing, I decided to buy an old Daisy gun BB 25 (picture below) that needs to be fixed and restored.

Wood Folk instrument Hardwood Wood stain Gun accessory


These are the problems that I noticed first hand:

-Trigger is lose and would not work.
-BBs will fall off the barrel after pumping up or charging the magazine (which is a part inside the barrel itself)
-Charging magazine inside the barrel is not possible without pumping down
-Pump is hard to pull back and it makes considerable noise when doing so
-Stock is slightly twisted at the end (most likely due to heat warping)

After these observations I started the process of disassembling the whole piece and I noticed the following:

-Inside seal of the barrel was upside down
-Trigger spring was missing

So I proceeded to set the inside seal on its right side in the barrel and that fixed the issue at charging the magazine. The missing spring at the trigger explains why the hammer is not holding the inner mechanism that shots BBs so I will have to order a spare piece online.

I still have some questions, however. one is:

What kind of oil and other materials should I use in order to lubricate and clean the metal pieces?
So far I thought on using white lithium grease and rust remover.

Is there anything else I should do to properly restore the gun?
I saw some videos where guys sank the metal pieces into rust remover for 24 hours or so.

I think that will be everything for now. This was fun to me. I enjoyed getting my hands dirty with this old airgun and I can barely wait to get it working. All suggestions are more than welcome.

Thank you very much for you attention.
 

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@Jamie_1991 - Welcome to the site. Please wander over to the Introductions section and tell us a bit about yourself. You will also want to familiarize yourself with this thread (it has good information on the site): So yer new here, huh?
 

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Looks like you are on the way to the money pit of working on guns there .
I started a few years back & have had a lot of fun learning ways to restore old guns .
I know nothing about air guns .
My guess is they have really thin metal so any stripping has to be done carefully .
There are a lot of videos on line about working on guns & worth the watching .
Real gunsmith videos not the DIY stuff .
Those can give you ideas but can damage guns too .
Any good fine gun oil is good to use .
I think there are places that you can buy rebuild kits for air guns .
I recently bought 30 rifles ( BB guns ) for my brother to mess around with . He said they were interesting to work on .
If you get out of that state then you can work on better guns but the tools are expensive . A good set of gun screwdrivers would be a start . Midway has a lot to choose from .
Good luck & hope you have fun .
 

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I suggest you read the book "It's a Daisy" - history of the Daisy air rifle now that you have a Model 25 in your hands. The early plastic stocks were bad about warping, don't know of a way to correct that but someone probably does. Most BB guns are over-oiled and the old oil gets full of dirt, gums up, etc. There are multiple schematics available on the Model 25, a gun that went through relatively few changes. They were the hardest-hitting BB guns in their day, cost a bit more than the regular "lever actions".

Markings on the barrel will give you an approximate age by checking references (not serial numbers, location of plant, etc.) Contact Daisy in Arkansas for parts. The Model 25 was chosen as their iconic issue for their anniversary, so at least some parts whould be available. Have fun. Millions of us started with a Daisy. BTW - "BB's" used to be lead, not steel. If you read the book, you'll find out why and how the steel BB came into use. It was not scientific. Have Fun ..and don't shoot your eye out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Looks like you are on the way to the money pit of working on guns there .
I started a few years back & have had a lot of fun learning ways to restore old guns .
I know nothing about air guns .
My guess is they have really thin metal so any stripping has to be done carefully .
There are a lot of videos on line about working on guns & worth the watching .
Real gunsmith videos not the DIY stuff .
Those can give you ideas but can damage guns too .
Any good fine gun oil is good to use .
I think there are places that you can buy rebuild kits for air guns .
I recently bought 30 rifles ( BB guns ) for my brother to mess around with . He said they were interesting to work on .
If you get out of that state then you can work on better guns but the tools are expensive . A good set of gun screwdrivers would be a start . Midway has a lot to choose from .
Good luck & hope you have fun .
I saw some of those videos and they were helpful to disassemble the piece properly.

Also, I already ordered a spare trigger spring from Ebay which hopefully will be arriving soon. That's all this old toy needs. It shots relatively fine and is quite fun (although, better not test it inside the house since BBs can leave marks on the walls, yahaha).

As soon as I get out of here, I will get my hands into the real stuff. A muzzleloader sounds like fun but who knows what will I get for sure.

Thank you, Ron.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I suggest you read the book "It's a Daisy" - history of the Daisy air rifle now that you have a Model 25 in your hands. The early plastic stocks were bad about warping, don't know of a way to correct that but someone probably does. Most BB guns are over-oiled and the old oil gets full of dirt, gums up, etc. There are multiple schematics available on the Model 25, a gun that went through relatively few changes. They were the hardest-hitting BB guns in their day, cost a bit more than the regular "lever actions".

Markings on the barrel will give you an approximate age by checking references (not serial numbers, location of plant, etc.) Contact Daisy in Arkansas for parts. The Model 25 was chosen as their iconic issue for their anniversary, so at least some parts whould be available. Have fun. Millions of us started with a Daisy. BTW - "BB's" used to be lead, not steel. If you read the book, you'll find out why and how the steel BB came into use. It was not scientific. Have Fun ..and don't shoot your eye out.
Hey Jhon.

Thanks for the advice. I'll get that book soon.

I was thinking I could replace the stock by 3d printing it, but I will need to do a custom model myself. Another project at hands!

Also, thanks for the warning. I always wear googles when I try to shot the gun. But I grew impatience and I accidentally made a hole mark on the roof. Landlord is not going to be happy...

Best regards,

Jamie
 

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Don't think the 3-D printing thing will work out, but I'm wrong about a lot of stuff. Model 25 started with a wooden stock (as was featured on the Anniversary edition). It's possible Daisy has some replacements (substitute wood for plastic, perhaps). If you can get a traced outline of the wooden stock, it'd be fairly easy to make one out of clear wood (not plywood), drill the appropriate hole, and stain it after a bit of hand sanding. Hardest part to find is the barrel/magazine. Lose that and you will have a "pop gun". Good luck.
 

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One last word of caution - the Model 25 (as with many spring-action BB guns) has a bad habit of "holding onto" one (or perhaps more than one) BB when you think they are empty because nearly all BB's are not perfectly round. Might lodge in the removable magazine or even in the barrel. 350 - 400 feet per second projectile is great for perforating cans, but they'll also perforate an eye, TV set, of other stuff. Have fun and go get another project. Check back here. Someone will help you.
 
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