Cylinder troubles

Discussion in 'Blackpowder & Musket' started by JLNobes, Feb 14, 2010.

  1. JLNobes

    JLNobes New Member

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    First off, if this was covered in a different thread and I missed it, I apologize. I have an 1851 Navy Colt revolver. The cylinder spins sometimes, other times it doesnt. Im getting a new hand spring and know that a streched body might be a problem since it is brass.The thing that leaves me thinking is that there are small groves worn next to the large ones on the cylinder. Is this a problem or normal wear and tear?


    Any help would be greatly appreciated.
     

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  2. TnRebel

    TnRebel New Member

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    I have a 1861 Army Colt 44 cal and some times my cylinder will tighten up on me and all I do is tap the wedge back a tap and it works fine after that .
     

  3. TXnorton

    TXnorton New Member

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    As advised by TnRebel, slightly tap the barrel wedge back in the (out) direction, the cylinder should loosen up.
     
  4. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    Normal drag- no problem unless it wears the shoulder of the locking notches to where they do NOT lock.

    Clean the rachet on the rear of the cylinder GOOD (old toothbrush) and make sure they are not wearing (little lite grease is good) and check tip of the hand for wear. Some repros have soft steel on some of the smaller parts.
     
  5. Slickrick214

    Slickrick214 New Member

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    I've seen it happen to a few officers here in the re-enacting world. As Tn rebel said the quick and easy fix is to tap the wedge back and it should work fine after that.
     
  6. TnRebel

    TnRebel New Member

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    We mite of met on the field of battle a time or two ,

    A tip of the kepi sir

    2nd Lt. 64th Tn. Rifles
     
  7. Sagetown

    Sagetown New Member

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    It appears that the Bolt Head is not retracting below the bolt window and is dragging as it leaves the Cylinder Notch. Off-time Bolt disengagement can be caused by worn or mislocated action screw holes in the frame, and/or in the hammer, bolt, or trigger; ~ worn, altered, or damaged bolt arm or Hammer Cam, or a combination of all the above.
     
  8. Sagetown

    Sagetown New Member

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    Hey JL:
    A closer look at your cylinder shows it is not a normal drag on the bolt head. What I see is the bolt head continues its drag from one cylinder notch to the next notch. That's not good.
    This could be caused by "early cylinder rotation". Meaning a long hand (pawl) surface.
    The bolt should be adjusted so that as you begin to cock the revolver the Bolt Head will drop just below the Frame Bolt Window "just" prior to the hand (pawl) engaging the Cylinder Ratchet.

    A proper adjusted bolt at the half cock position, and the cylinder removed from the frame, will hold the Bolt Head just below the window frame .
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2010
  9. JLNobes

    JLNobes New Member

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    Thank you guys for your input, I really appreciate it. How do I adjust the bolt?
     
  10. Sagetown

    Sagetown New Member

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    Some Brass guns have passed inspection with quick fixes that eventually shows up after time, leaving the owner to find a way to make repairs, or use it for a wall hanger.

    Wow ! :eek: That question would call for a course in gunsmithing to answer. But just for starters - - -:D
    The Hammer Cam is what begins the process of Bolt Pickup, the Cam rises and arc's rearward as the hammer is being cocked, pushing upward on the left Bolt Arm causing the bolt head to drop out of the cylinder notch. There may be one or several reasons why that's not happening.
     
  11. MadJohn

    MadJohn New Member

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    Cylinder Problem

    First off, brass frame open top (Colt style) revolvers can be quite weak. On the other hand, after several rounds of firing there can be a build-up of fouling on the cylinder face, preventing easy rotation. In battle during the Civil War Remington Army and Navy revolvers were notorious for this problem. Actually they were machined so well that the clearance between cylinder and barrel was quite tight. Tapping the wedge out slightly is a quick fix but it needs to be cleaned to keep a healthy gun. Sloppy wedge can be a bad thing as it causes undue force on the frame where the wedge goes through and it is really hard on the cylinder mandrel (cylinder pivot pin) causeing alot of stress on the wedge slot. I have seen cracked frames and broken mandrels If the wedge is kept tight the forces of firing propels the ball down the barrel not hammering your gun to death. Happy shooting....