cutting a barrel and making a replacement bead (w/pics)

Discussion in 'DIY Projects' started by DIY_guy, Mar 25, 2014.

  1. DIY_guy

    DIY_guy New Member

    214
    0
    0
    We have all seen it. An old shotgun with a missing bead. I have a very old shotgun with a damaged barrel. The barrel had been cut off by a prior owner who took off about an inch for some unknown reason. This left no bead nor tapped hole where the bead should be. On top of that the barrel has a rather bad bulge about 6 inches from the end. The goal here is to cut down the barrel and add back the missing bead.

    While a hacksaw works (and even coined the phrase "sawed off shotgun", a pipe cutter leaves a straighter edge that is easier to clean up.

    [​IMG]

    A little filing and fine sandpaper cleans up the cut nicely. Next the barrel is tapped 3/8 to ½ inch from the muzzle.

    [​IMG]

    The bead that I will be making is threaded #4-40 tpi so I tap the barrel accordingly.

    [​IMG]

    To make a bead I start with a #4-40 brass screw. I wrap the threads with tape to protect them. Then I mount the screw in the chuck of a hand drill so I can spin it creating a sort of mini metal lathe.

    [​IMG]

    Using a small file and fine sandpaper I reshape the head of the screw into a ball shape.

    [​IMG]

    Here is a before and after.

    [​IMG]

    The bead can then be threaded into the barrel to mark where it needs to be cut off.

    [​IMG]

    Holding such a small part for the cut-off can be tough unless you have a proper sized nut to thread onto the screw.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The finished bead installed.

    [​IMG]

    Dont let that old shotgun suffer the indignity of being beadless.
     
  2. hmh

    hmh New Member

    962
    0
    0
    Have to try that kind of kicking myself wondering why I haven't thought of that
     

  3. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

    7
    2
    0
    vert well done! excellent job.

    but a quick question. how did you determine where to drill the hole for the bead, to make sure it was in line where it needed to be? i'd be interested in your method.

    thank you.
     
  4. DIY_guy

    DIY_guy New Member

    214
    0
    0
    At the top of the barrel. LOL

    You can see the gun is sitting in a MTM case guard stand. See link

    http://www.mtmcase-gard.com/products/shooting/gun-cleaning.html

    With the gun solidly in an upright position its pretty easy to find the top of the barrel. Use a punch once you locate that spot as it creates a depression or dimple for the drill bit the start and prevents it from wandering off the curve of the barrel.
     
  5. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

    29,523
    507
    113
    Very nicely done. I'm impressed.
     
  6. BillDeShivs

    BillDeShivs Member

    851
    2
    18
    Pipe cutters should not be used in cutting shotgun barrels. They compress the steel in the cut, constricting the size of the bore.
    A hacksaw should be used, then files to smooth the cut.
     
  7. DIY_guy

    DIY_guy New Member

    214
    0
    0


    This is not a bad thing. See link for explanation. I cut this barrel in the “purple” area and in no way got even close to reducing the muzzle close to where the original choke dia was. Recall that the barrel was bulged and why the barrel was cut and the pipe cutter would likely bring the dia. Back closer to where it ought to be.

    http://www.briley.com/understandingshotgunchokesabriefexplanationbybriley.aspx
     
  8. BillDeShivs

    BillDeShivs Member

    851
    2
    18
    No. The pipe cutter BLADE constricts the metal in the cut. A constriction at the muzzle is nothing like a choke.
     
  9. DIY_guy

    DIY_guy New Member

    214
    0
    0
    Agreed and that compression (Because it was bulged anyway) is not a negative. Couple that with filing the muzzle at the cut means I am in no way concerned and that is is still far larger than the original choke of the uncut barrel.
     
  10. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

    4,282
    50
    48
    It is easy to remove the small amount of metal that is displaced by the cutting wheel on the pipe cutter so when you stick your finger in you do not feel a 'lip'. I fully agree this lip should be removed but it certainly would not be catastrophic if it was left in place.