Custom snap caps

Discussion in 'Cleaning and Maintenance' started by jigs-n-fixture, Sep 6, 2014.

  1. jigs-n-fixture

    jigs-n-fixture Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I own several rifles I can't buy snap caps for.

    I was thinking about trying to find a source for some form of nylon rod in a diameter close to the diameter of primers and inserting it into the primer pockets, and had a flash of insight that the hot melt glue from the glue gun might be a suitable alternative. I'm thinking of loading up a dummy round and filling the primer hole, and the sanding it flush.

    Anyone have any ideas that are better?


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  2. clr8ter

    clr8ter New Member

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    Actually, that sounds like a pretty good idea. Probably better than buying the commercial ones, even if you CAN find the caliber you need. Although, I would probably opt for a piece of nylon rod. If my lathe was currently running, I'd offer to turn some pieces to fit.
     

  3. elfmdl

    elfmdl New Member

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    What I have done is cut an eraser down to size and put it in the primer pocket. Then seated a bullet on my reloading press. Just be sure to clearly mark the case somehow so you know it isn't live
     
  4. Highpower

    Highpower New Member

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    RTV silicone. When cured, trim them to just above flush to the case head with a razor blade.

    For .22 rimfire, just use a #4 drywall anchor (yellow). Rotate to different positions and they will take multiple hits. The extractor will grab the rim and pull them from the chamber too.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. fa35jsf

    fa35jsf New Member

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    I have had problems with the eraser in the primer pocket method. Multiple strikes cause the eraser to divot and start going through the flash hole. I have taken used primer cups and seated them backwards in the pocket and then put in the eraser. That helps. The nylon seems like a better solution though.


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  6. BillDeShivs

    BillDeShivs Member

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    Erasers, nylon rod, glue, and silicone offer no resistance to the firing pin. It simply penetrates them.
    Using stuff like this might make you feel better, but it does nothing for your firing pin.
    A primer-sized piece of solid brass rod, held in the primer pocket with silicone might work.
     
  7. clr8ter

    clr8ter New Member

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    Agreed on erasers, glue and silicone. The nylon rod I bet would be about right, though. I think brass would be too hard, and it's not at all resilient. It'd dent, and stay that way. On the snap caps you buy, the primer inserts are soft enough to flex with your fingernail.
     
  8. BillDeShivs

    BillDeShivs Member

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    I imagine nylon would crater the first time it is struck by the pin. I said solid brass, glued in with silicone rubber. The rubber would give the brass just a little give. The little sharp firing pin tip is travelling very fast- with a lot of force behind it. It will simply penetrate soft materials. When it does there is very little or no resistance-especially after the first time.
    You want to replicate what happens when the pin hits a primer. Plastics, rubber, etc. can't do that.
    On the surface, it seems that these things would work. But, when you really think about it, you can see why they won't.
     
  9. jigs-n-fixture

    jigs-n-fixture Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Checked the "primer" on a couple of snap caps today with a Shore A hardness tester. The snap cap "primer" measured 89.5-Ha. UHMW measures 101-Ha, (too hard). The hot glue stick I'm thinking of using measures a hardness of 93.0-Ha.

    I think it will work. At least I'm sure enough to risk an old piece of brass finding out.


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  10. BillDeShivs

    BillDeShivs Member

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    Snap cap primers are not rigid. They are either sprung, or attached with an adhesive that gives, therefore you can't test the hardness properly.
    I don't know what UHMW is, but hot melt glue will simply crater and offer no resistance.
    You aren't risking a piece of brass, you're risking your firing pin.
     
  11. clr8ter

    clr8ter New Member

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    Ultra High Molecular Weight plastic. That was a good idea, testing with a hardness tester. But some here may be right, the glue may not bounce back...
     
  12. jigs-n-fixture

    jigs-n-fixture Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I should have access to a D scale Shore tester next week. The dimension of the probe needle are closer to the tip of a firing pin. I'll try it when I get it, and see what it shows. I prefer to come up with a readily available plastic solution utilizing a single component. Rather than trying figure out a duplex solution involving an elastic medium retaining a metal floating impact pad.

    It might be easier to redesign the firing pin to include a UHMW, or Delrin impact collar, than to develop a two component system.


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