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The trigger guard show either a mag release or a floor plate release. Mucho custom work in that piece.
Right, The more we look the more we find. The marks be left on the receiver may have been done on purpose. The action ,even when I was,a kid was extra ordinary. Original owner may have asked marks to be left for his own reason. I have seen custom Mauser's with all original marks left in place. Reason being you and I have probably seen built up scrubbed Mauser's. Question of the day is what is this thing-German or Spanish etc. Point being it would have been no big deal to totally scrub the action in all that work.
 

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I wonder what an eagle 63 proof is doing on a Brno made rifle. I would find it hard to call that rifle sporterised. Down here a modified military rifle is call "sporterized and redid.." Looks like the only GI parts on that rifle are the receiver and bolt body.
 

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I carry a 9mm. Shield 1.0 or an S&W model 12-2. Mauser shooter & collector
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I wonder what an eagle 63 proof is doing on a Brno made rifle. I would find it hard to call that rifle sporterised. Down here a modified military rifle is call "sporterized and redid.." Looks like the only GI parts on that rifle are the receiver and bolt body.
According to the excellent K98k reference books, Karabiner 98k by Bruce Karem and Michael Steves, the waffenampt WaA 63 and e/63 were used on dot marked Brunn G33/40s made between 1940 and 1942.

Karabiner 98k Vol. II b, page 655

Waffenampts were designated for use by inspection units not singular factories. Needless to say most can be found on German military equipment made by various manufacturers.
 

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According to the excellent K98k reference books, Karabiner 98k by Bruce Karem and Michael Steves, the waffenampt WaA 63 and e/63 were used on dot marked Brunn G33/40s made between 1940 and 1942.

Karabiner 98k Vol. II b, page 655

Waffenampts were designated for use by inspection units not singular factories. Needless to say most can be found on German military equipment made by various manufacturers.
Thanks for the correction. My source was a Mauser maven on Gunboards,com. I've amended my text accordingly - with apologies.
 

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I appreciate the OP's showing us his very fine rifle. Back in the day one of the top actions used building a custom hunting rifle was the G33/40. It was unique in the hollow bolt handle and lightening cuts in the receiver. Plus Czechoslovakian actions are held in high esteem till the present day.

OP's rifle is a good example, to me, of custom work. The selection of wood is very good. The checkering, from the pictures, is flawless. The wood to metal fit appears "air tight: The lines of the stock are good. The overall design of entire rifle shows good taste and design if you are into classic sporters.The attention to detail is excellent. Every aspect of that rifle appears very well thought out. If one has any feel at all for classic high powered rifles this rifle would come out a far beyond average. I like it due to no white spacers or bulbous Monte Carlo cheek piece.

That scope looks like a Leupold M8 variable. The base is clearly a Burris. Burris company dates from 1971.What we see may be the way that rifle was set up originally.

I prefer to leave marks on the receiver that identifies the origin of the action. That rifle would sell as a G33/40 based very high quality custom rifle. On the down side there is an unmodified 33/40 carbine on an auction site today where the last bid was $3750.00. I have known several advanced collectors of German WW2 firearms. Those guys held that a big problem doing research is unreliable information in print
 

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Did you ever find any evidence of who made the rifle?. It would be like a name of an individual or a company.on the barrel. Also, thanks for showing us the rifle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
No, I can’t find anything on it. They took the gun apart to see what else I can have one more set of markings on the other side but that’s it. I’ve never used one of these older Burris scope mounts either and couldn’t figure out how to get the front ring off, I’m going to have to do some digging to see how to get the ring off of the base. I was hoping to find the year stamped underneath that scope mount but we’ll have to do that a different time. As far as a manufacture I can’t find anything.
 

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The rear ring is held by the side screws. Remove one screw and rotate the scope 90 degrees to the side to release and lift out. It looks like there is a locking plate at the front of your forward rings. I have not seen this system used in a long time. I had it on a rifle a long time ago.
 

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Leupold has a similar system.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
That video was perfect, it was that front locking plate I was having trouble figuring out and didn’t dare pull or push or yank too much. I’ll try that a little later and see if I can get it off. Thanks for finding that.
 

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.It is not totally unknown for high quality rifles to show up without name. One authority who was sorting through his extensive collection wrote of a known makers going underground to generate cash during the depression.

When I see rifles like yours I suspect the gun may have been assembled by several artisans. If that's the case somebody knew a great deal about how a rifle should look and feel.

Also, Leopold scopes since 1974 have serial numbers that give year of make. See Leupold website. I'd guess that your rifle may date from the early middle 1970's. That's just a guess. We are researching a 1903 custom sporter as coming from the early 1930's. It's just trying to work out a puzzle.Same deal.

Thanks again for sharing your wonderful rifle with us folks. Take care and be safe.
 

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in an auction that rifle will start at 1000.00 then 1500.00 would be my guess now , I have 1 of these and it's a lightened model 98 , it's a small ring 98 not good for magnum cartridges but outstanding for std cartridges the gun is light , practical a true hunting rifle . It's a rare breed for sure mine is in .243 win and shoots excellent of all my guns it would be in the top 3 as a keeper .
 

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It's a rare breed for sure mine is in .243 win and shoots excellent of all my guns it would be in the top 3 as a keeper .
Right, it's a keeper. Let me ask you a question. If you saw that rifle with an asking price of $1500.00 what would you do.? I'd be out the door knowing that seller had screwed up by $1000.00 minimum.

I kinda think you may be underestimating the quality of metal and woodwork. It would be worthwhile to try to figure who made the rifle-the provenance...That information could possibly put price to another level I'd bet OP's gun came out of an estate.
 
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Right, it's a keeper. Let me ask you a question. If you saw that rifle with an asking price of $1500.00 what would you do.? I'd be out the door knowing that seller had screwed up by $1000.00 minimum.

I kinda think you may be underestimating the quality of metal and woodwork. It would be worthwhile to try to figure who made the rifle-the provenance...That information could possibly put price to another level I'd bet OP's gun came out of an estate.
@jcornell
I have been really wondering about how and where he acquired this beautiful rifle. Just interested is all.
 

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I hope OP can fill in some of the details. He may be tired of fooling with us!
 

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Right, it's a keeper. Let me ask you a question. If you saw that rifle with an asking price of $1500.00 what would you do.? I'd be out the door knowing that seller had screwed up by $1000.00 minimum.

I kinda think you may be underestimating the quality of metal and woodwork. It would be worthwhile to try to figure who made the rifle-the provenance...That information could possibly put price to another level I'd bet OP's gun came out of an estate.
German G33/40 .257 Roberts Custom Sporter Bolt Action Rifle you will need to find the right person over 1500.00 don't get me wrong it's a nice rifle .
 
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