Culling deer

Discussion in 'Hunting Forum' started by Sniper03, Sep 3, 2011.

  1. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    Just wondered here how many of we deer hunters practice Culling Deer (Not Calling) in case you thought I misspelled it! :D
    I never shoot a buck under 4 years of age. At least the best I can determine the age! As a rule, I look at the stomach area in front of the rear flank to see the curvature. And some other features like grey in areas a young buck would not. Obviously, antler size does not always mean a mature buck. I have seen some young Bucks that had fantastic racks that were two years old. But they were free to go to grow! And what a lot of hunters fail to realize these young deer have good genealogy that needs to be passed on by breeding does while they are young! Anyway, I will shoot a doe for meat if it is mature and does not have a fawn or yearling with her. Just wondered if some of you practice similar hunting practices. I know some shoot everything they see including some I have seen that were no larger than a large German Shepherd. No wonder they never get a chance at a good buck. Just inquiring!

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  2. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    I actually will pass on a trophy buck. Taste like Sh!t. I'd rather take a young buck, or a cull.
     

  3. Gatoragn

    Gatoragn Active Member

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    If I am hunting as a guest, I follow the rules of the landowner/leaseholders.

    I have let many legal small bucks walk, but I have no set age limit. I just prefer not to waste a tag on small deer, not enough meat on them.

    To each his own, but to me trying to measure the antlers before shooting takes a lot of the fun out of hunting.
     
  4. awahlster

    awahlster New Member

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    Sniper03 you hunt in a different world then I do. If I was as picky as you were I would be lucky to harvest a deer every 4-5 years instead of the every other year like now. In Oregon hunter success for the west side of the state runs around 30%. Now some states I read allow people to get as many as 4-6 deer here the most you can get if you lucky enough to draw a controlled hunt tag is 2 animals.

    So if I see a legal buck I'll shoot said legal buck.
     
  5. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    As said, depends on where you are. Here in VA, we deer hunt in self defense- bag limit 2 a day, 6 per season, PLUS 1 for black powder, PLUS 1 per day per bonus tag- POTENTIALLY about 41 deer per year POSSIBLE (legally)

    Frankly, I do not hunt for trophies, I hunt for the freezer. Would prefer a nice fat doe anytime. Never could find a good recipe for antlers. :p
     
  6. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    AW,

    Man I would think in OR the percentages would have been a lot higher. What is the reason there. I picture OR being very wooded and etc kind of like WA State? Did you advise you have to draw for a tag! Like C3 stated I guess it does depend on the state and circumstances. I hunt in Tennessee where I live and Texas. Nothing unusual to see 5-10 deer a day. Obviously a guy has to have meat for Summer Sausage, Back Strap and etc. But some of the deer I have seen shot would not have enough to be worth the effort. Let me know about that tag deal. I have some friends who live in Tualatin OR.

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  7. lonyaeger

    lonyaeger New Member

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    I myself only shoot culls, and anybody else who hunts out here does the same. We're saving the trophies for the paying customers in a year or two!
     
  8. Hawg

    Hawg New Member

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    Here the does outnumber the bucks so I usually go after does but if a cow horn comes up he's history(bad genes). Likewise if a really nice 10 or 12 pointer comes out, well I need the knife handles.:D
     
  9. jjfuller1

    jjfuller1 New Member

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    with less than limited time in the woods now a days and less deer sightings as long as its not spotted i'll shoot. gotta have that freezer at least a little stocked
     
  10. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    Hawg,

    You are correct. We shoot all the cow horns. We call them Dork Deer. Don't want their genes passed on. We have been practicing the before mentioned program and now we are seeing some big bucks every year. It has took about ten years to see good benifits to the program. But the young bucks we passed on when they were young are throwing some great genetics and the mature deer are getting bigger and larger racks. We each only shoot one buck per year and then harvest does who do not have young with them for meat each year. I offset my love for hunting by hunting coyotes and pigs. You know a guy has to have something to hunt! :D For me there is no harder game to hunt than hunting the Coyote. They are very intelligent and can wind a hunter a mile away it seems like. For me they are one of the ultimate challenges when not deer hunting or when I have filled my bag on deer.

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  11. Hawg

    Hawg New Member

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    We actually had a law that protected the cow horns. We had to have four points or better. It's better now but there's still a 13 inch beam length with one under length per year allowed.
     
  12. onenut58

    onenut58 New Member

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    awahlester I have a friend who lives in big sandy tennesee.I have been to his place and seen the deer out there. You have to under stand its a different world out there.First off the deer there area different specie of white tail. They are in the largest versions, human tiny compared to western white tails.Google it up and you will see they are called virginia white tail.
    The only smaller you will find are in Georgia and florida.I went hunting in americus georgia before when I was in my early twenties and was shocked at what they called a huge deer.A big buck being about the size of a yearling doe in the pacific north west.
    The deer in florida are about the same size Where I have seen brought in.
    The terrian is not rouged like out west and the human populations out east mean they hunt off private land and out of what they call tree stands.They carry these stands out in the woods and set them up high in a tree and wait for deer to walk up and ambush them.Some places they build towers and actual shacks to shoot out of.
    The deer feed off farmers fields and develope trails back and forth connecting them. They have different type trees back there that produce acorns and the deer feed off them also.They have a few black bear but they to are way smaller and not in large numbers like the pacific north west. They have cougars but also in small numbers and they call them panthers instead if cougars.They have no griz or wolverine and not nearly as many coyotes or wolves who eat the babies as there born etc.
    So the deer dont have the natural predators the western deer do. They do not get 20 feet iof snow in there mountains and have winter die off.Some areas in the south have no mountains at all. Florida is as flat as a pancake.Western teenesee is pretty much flat with rolling type terrain.Eastern teenesee looks simular to oregon with tiny mountains and the trees are not ever greens.
    There are not thousands of square miles of wilderness and the deer are confined to patches of woods.So deer hunting is a different ball game back east.I used to drive truck long haul and stop and visit old army buddies who took me out into there woods and educated me on there deer and there terrain and hunting techniques.I just spent a year and a half in new smyna beach florida and came out to northern nevada about 4 months ago
    Florida has a lot of deer but poaching is a serious problem there.Whith some of the lowest wages in the nation there are a lot of poor people there Poaching mostly at nightThere are many maimed deer from being shot at during the night and you see and hear about them all the time.
    My neighbors belonged to what they call hunting clubs back east.You pay a fee to hunt on private property and they have what are called hunting camps.There are usualy permanent buildings or trailers on them and people all go out during season and head off to predestined tree stands and sit and wait for deer to come buy like in tenn and georgia.
    My friend in tennesee is allowed to kill 9 deer per year.
    Your state of oregon has a unique problem because of do gooders who made it illegal to hunt cougar with dogs.Oregon has a massive problem with cougars who are decimating the deer and elk .Hunting a cougar with out dogs is like looking for a needle in a haystack.The arctic grey wolves planted in Idaho and montana are being spotted in oregon now to and that makes the problem even worse.They will be on the coast soon as they widen there territory.
    Until the hunters get together there in oregon and repeal the law about hunting cougars with dogs. You can count on deer populations to dwindle even further. The hunters in Idaho have pushed for some time now to repeal the wolf protection and they have wreaked havock on the deer and elk populations.The law was repealed this year and although hunting season had to be shortened the last couple years. It does not face being shut down .The wolves will be killed off down to managable numbers. You can still hunt cougar with dogs in Idaho and montana and there populations have not exploded like there in oregon.
    I am living about 4 hours south od baker oregon in winnemucca nevada rigfht now. Have to so I can work here in the gold mines.I am ten hours from North idaho where I am from. I am thinking of going to baker to hunt this year because its closer. The deer and elk populations there are still fairly healthey although they have been feeling the effects of the cougars.You might think about hunting more inland because the populations are smaller than on the coast and less hunting pressure.The white tail and mule deer as well as elk are still in pretty good numbers around baker. My uncle lives there.The terrain is varing from heavy timber and brush to open sage brush areas. You can stalk or glass hill sides for long shots.Its all very steep and high country.Here in Nevada they have scroungy deer fairly small and taste like sage brush.They have a few elk and you have to put in for a tag to hunt either. The deer here are like rabbits all over the place.I dont know why they make people put in for tags. the elk you have to drive long distances to hunt and it isnt worth it. I have never eaten any of the nevada elk.The canyon I live at the base of now is infested with deer and cougar.But I no interest in hunting here.
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2011
  13. powg

    powg New Member

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    contolled harvest

    I have practice re-straint for years now ....when i first started hunting ...a legal buck had about a mili-second to make his peace ! now i harvest mature ,dry bag does ..no fawns or yearlings with her ... a good solid 2.5- 4 yr old buck averages 120-130 class hear in east tx If he's got long tines , 8 points or better and heavy beams Ill shoot him ..if not let em walk!:cool:
     
  14. awahlster

    awahlster New Member

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    onenut58 I'm 53 years old have hunted in Oregon for deer since I was 11 so I got about 42 years of experiance.

    So I got a fair idea of how to go about it. And here they are Columbia River Blacktail a sub Species of the Mule Deer. We do have some Whitetail but they are a tiny population and protected in most of their range.

    I would enjoy huntng in a place that there are so many deer wandering around in circles you get to pick and close the ones you will shoot today.

    Here a very good hunter in good range might be lucky to see one or two bucks a season.

    And its not the cougars (though they ain't helping) Oregon's harvest rate has been in the 30-35% range for as long as I can remember. Maybe when I was still in school it was a little higher but I follow the stats pretty close.
     
  15. onenut58

    onenut58 New Member

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    Awahlster I am not sure how you got the idea I was telling you how to hunt deer.I even re -read my post trying to see where you may have gotten the idea.My description of what I have seen back east as far as there hunting and huge populations of deer I dont feel applies to telling you how to hunt deer in Oregon.
    I assumed being from Oregon you knew how to hunt and all I was doing was telling you why they have so many deer in Tenn for instance.
    Another forum I have frequented for some time has members from Oregon in it who regularly complain about the cougars and i have read about it myself after hearing them complaining.There is a significant problem with them in parts of Oregon and they are making significant reductions in deer population.
    What ever happens in your state can effect mine or visa versa.The wolves are not major problem in your state right now. But it is a fact they are there.It is also a fact they breed fast average 130 pounds and expand there territory very fast.
    i didnt know about your black tails. The deer here in nevada are black tails that are a smaller species of mule deer about the size of a white tail.
    You say you would enjoy hunting in a area where the deer are plentiful like Tenn. I told you about the deer over around baker.There are a lot of white tail there and mule deer.But no where in north west are the deer as plentiful as back east.
    I wasnt telling you how to hunt but just wherei have seen for myself there were a lot of deer and elk in your state.
    I will tell you this and hope it clarifies why I would never tell you how to hunt deer or any one else. I have never hunted deer in the north west in my life.I have never tracked one nor went out seeking one.I never hunted them in Tenn or florida where i mentioned just was taken to stands and hunting areas and shown. I did go with a friend hunting deer in Georgia although I didnt hunt myself and was just along being shown the way they do it.
    I have how ever killed many deer over the years I have hunted and I am also 53 and started legaly hunting at 12.So my back ground is simular to yours.The deer are plentiful enough that I always got one during my elk hunting. I simply come across them as I hunt elk. Many times I just let them go because I do not want to mess up my elk hunting with a shot.
    I would like to appologize to you for wording my thoughts wrong and giving you the idea I was telling you how to hunt or for letting you know about the baker area and it comming across as telling you where to hunt.
    There is also a lot more to hunting back east than I said briefly.I would never presume to tell those fellas how to hunt either in there area.I was as lost out there as they would be in the north west.
     
  16. Txhillbilly

    Txhillbilly Active Member

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    One of the main reasons that ranchers/landowners here in Texas started putting up high fences was because the neighboring ranches/hunters would just shoot any deer they saw,and not do any type of manangement programs in the area.
    You can really tell the difference in the body size and genetics from a manangement program,and a free range deer population.

    The areas that I've hunted for years (all low fenced) has it's ups and downs on managing deer. You always know when someone has new hunters on their leases,on opening day it sounds like a war zone in the area.They will shoot any deer they see,instead of taking the time to look at the deer in the area,and only taking those that need to be taken out of the herd.

    I'll take a spike buck or a non bearing doe,before I take a young nice racked buck.I also like to thin out the does every couple years,to keep the doe/buck ratio in check.
     
  17. Robinnz

    Robinnz New Member

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    I live in another world , where culling deer has been a government policy for many years , and now helicopters are used by some hunters as a means to hunt and shoot their deer from .. As a young shooter a local farmer would ring me and ask me to come out and kill every deer I saw ,and I saw plenty , mobs of 20 to 40 were not uncommon , I would shoot between 4 and 8 to satisfy him and tell him I saw 10 or 12... I used to take as much meat as I could carry , to feed my family , the farmer would drag the dead deer into a heap and burn them ,his family would not eat venison .. No licence, no tags, no limit to how many you take in New Zealand .. Robinnz
     
  18. Win73

    Win73 New Member

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    Here in Alabama the bow season opens mid October, the gun season mid November. Both run through January. The limit is 2 a day, one of which can be a buck. So I could legally kill about 210 deer a season. There has been for about three seasons now a 3 buck season limit (obviously trying to get people to kill more does). And if you do kill 3 bucks, one is supposed to have at least 4 points on one antler.

    There are no tags and no checking the deer you kill with anyone. All you have to do is add big game when you buy your regular hunting license. That does kick the cost up to $24 from $16.

    The most I have killed in one season was four season before last. Last season I only killed two. Incidently those last six were all does. The only thing not legal is spotted fawns and bucks that don't have antlers at least one inch above the hair line.

    I let many does and legal bucks walk last season. Especially the last three weeks of the season, I was hunting strictly for this fellow. He is an eight pointer. He made it through last season because I got pictures of him in February.

    [​IMG]
     
  19. 1982flh80

    1982flh80 New Member

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    Could you... really?

    Shoot a poor doe? You mean like this sweet little babe of the woods? (sniff sniff weep weep) Say it isn't so! Thats what my neighbors ask me all the time. And yes she is crapping in my yard.
     

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  20. Robinnz

    Robinnz New Member

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    Hi , there are no cyotes in New zealand , so I cant compare hunting peacocks with them but I have found and others could well agree that these birds are cunning ,have binocular vision , and in spite of what you might think have gaudy and easily seen colours are masters at camoflage and will disappear into countryside which hardly offers enough cover for a mouse .. I rate them right up there as hard to stalk and will test the hunting skill of the best and they must be way better to eat than the fattest yote ever taken .. Robinnz