copper deposits on barrel extention

Discussion in 'AR-15 Discussion' started by talbertjm, Dec 25, 2009.

  1. talbertjm

    talbertjm Member

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    was wondering if this is normal. i noticed copper deposits where the bolt and the barrel extension meet. shot 80 rounds on a new gun, bushmaster m4 is what i have. I'm new so forgive my ignorance. i did a search and found nothing.

    joe
     
  2. FCross7

    FCross7 New Member

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    If you didn't follow the proper break-in procedure, the barrel is gonna have some machining marks from where the rifling was cut, this can cause quite a bit of copper fouling. Did you do any sort of breaking-in of the barrel?

    -Fred
     

  3. unknownhero82

    unknownhero82 New Member

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    just for my own sake at the least...what is the proper way to break in a barrel?
     
  4. FCross7

    FCross7 New Member

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    Fire a round, clean the barrel. Do that for 25 rounds. Then start shooting 3 rounds in between cleanings until your up to 50 rounds, then do 5 rounds in between cleaning until your up to 100 rounds. The point of doing this is to try to get the burrs from machining the rifling out before any amount of copper is allowed to build up.

    -Fred
     
  5. unknownhero82

    unknownhero82 New Member

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    sweet...i'm glad i found that out before i went shootin...now i just need to get a boresnake and i'll be set:D
     
  6. FCross7

    FCross7 New Member

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    Boresnakes are nice to take to the range and pull through every once in a while if your shooting a lot of rounds, but for a good cleaning, they're not the best. You'd be much better to get a good one piece rod with a free spinning handle, a copper brush, and a jag tip.

    -Fred
     
  7. unknownhero82

    unknownhero82 New Member

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    yeah i got a niice like 40something piece cleaning kit which i'll use when i get home along with my fav hops #9 :D but while i'm at the range breakin in i figure a boresnake would be fine....right?
     
  8. FCross7

    FCross7 New Member

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    I wouldn't think so, but there are others here that would be better to ask on something like that. JD, Slo, all you other guys who have way too much knowledge for one brain, what say you? Boresnake good for breaking in a barrel?

    -Fred
     
  9. talbertjm

    talbertjm Member

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    shot 20 rounds one at a time not getting crazy, cleaned, shot 40 more, cleaned. shot 20 more now about to clean weapon.
     
  10. hillbilly68

    hillbilly68 New Member

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    Hey bradda, an Otis might do you better. Keeps you from dragging the fouling back through it each time.
     
  11. unknownhero82

    unknownhero82 New Member

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    an Otis?? never heard of...let me google that right quick like:)
     
  12. unknownhero82

    unknownhero82 New Member

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    wow...very niice but it looks alot like a boresnake to me...just thinner and more parts to it
     
  13. ARnoob

    ARnoob New Member

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    Is this what you're referring to?

    http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f18/oxidation-barrel-flash-hider-21341/
     
  14. talbertjm

    talbertjm Member

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  15. slowryde45

    slowryde45 New Member

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    most of us who shoot AR's, or any firearm for that matter, will have our favorite routines, utensils, and solutions for cleaning and lubing. but it helps to have a basic foundation of what, how, when, where-to disassemble, clean, scrub, etc.

    from the sounds of a few of the recent posts, we could still use some re-fresher courses and reminders. here's a few that I still find myself going back to from time to time.

    Cleaning and Maintenance of the AR-15


    Educational Zone #49 - Cleaning & Lubricating an AR15 Rifle - Page 1

    How to properly clean the bolt carrier in an AR-15 rifle | Video « Wonder How To

    Brownells Search : Gun Cleaning & Chemicals : AR-15 Special Cleaning Tools - World's Largest Supplier of Firearm Accessories, Gun Parts and Gunsmithing Tools

    Cleaning the AR15 Barrel

    Fulton Armory FAQ: Cleaning and Lubricating the AR-15/M16/M16A1

    Cleaning & Disassembling an AR-15 Rifle: Video Series | eHow Videos

    Cleaning the AR15 Rifle at Impact Guns Home

    That's a decent start, and a good assortment. As for cleaning solutions and supplies, again pay attention to the videos, text, and manuals for your particular firearm. Pick up a basic cleaning kit, (doesn't have to be that $200 tacticool special), with a cleaning rod, patches, brushes - designed to clean .22/.223 and learn how to use it.

    I would advise against relying solely on WD-40, it has it's place but will not provide sufficient lubrication or protection. CLP's, such as Break Free and Slip2000, are highly recommended. Birchwood Casey Gun Scrubber, Gun Slick Foaming Bore Cleaner, Hoppes #9, Butch's Bore Shine, Sweet's 7.62 Solution, MPro7, all will work for cleaning, along with compressed air for blowing out extra solution, grit and grime. Again, pay attention to areas that require oiling, lubing, or grease. Some even use their own concoctions, involving Mobil1, tranny fluid, etc.

    Again, each of us will find a routine, favorite solutions, etc. The important part is making sure you clean it, not necessarily after EVERY shoot, (if you want to, then do it), but specially if you are shooting 'dirty' ammo, or in a dusty, muddy, rainy, SALTY, environment. Some will require more grease, lube, oils than others, some may even run their's DRY. it all comes down to what floats your boat and keeps your's running. not everything that someone else does in their area and on their guns might work for you in your area and on your gun.

    so, learn how to disassemble it (and REASSEMBLE it), learn how to properly CLEAN and LUBE it, learn how to inspect the parts looking for carbon deposits (as seen on some recent pics posted in here), know where to look for hidden carbon build-ups (bolt carrier group is a good one - know how to take it apart, inspect your extractor and spring - replace the spring every 5000 rounds, sooner if you do a lot of heavy and hot shooting. learn how to take apart your magazine bodies - squirt some graphite powder into them and shake them around to keep them working for you.

    none of this is rocket science, and any of us can do it. if you run into a problem, or still have questions, by all means ask away. we've got a decent group here, various levels of knowledge and skills (some even with Ninja skills ;)). check out the links above, re-familiarize yourself, even learn a few new skills on how to, and you'll keep those new toys working for years to come.
     
  16. hillbilly68

    hillbilly68 New Member

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    OMG, just out of idle curiosity I checked one of the links. Only had to look at one to find some dude using a wire wheel to strip carbon off the tail of the bolt. The disinformation net is alive and well.

    1. Use quality gun oil. No WD 40, etc. Will keep comments on CLP brand CLP to myself. (go with SLIP 2000 EWL...subliminal message)

    2. Throw those effing mil issue sectioned cleaning rods away. Use a one piece carbon rod and jag, or a cable type that you can drop through and pull in the direction of travel. One patch, one pass. Apply that logic to a boresnake and it is clear why one should not be used. Dont spend a ton on this and that to clean with - solvent, lube, patches and a good tool to get a patch or occasionally a brush down a bore. Not much more is required.

    3. Metal dental tools? Steel scrapers to get all that horrible carbon off the bolt tail that will surely build up and cause a DI rifle to detonate?

    Follow the rules of gun handling, shoot safe, keep it wet, shoot good ammo, dont damage the tool when you clean it. Learn what wears, replace parts BEFORE they break.

    My 2cents (and 24 continuous years of M16/M4/AR shooting experience).
     
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2009
  17. slowryde45

    slowryde45 New Member

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    LOL...well I never said to take any of that as GOSPEL now did I? The point I was trying to make, is that folks should learn all the basics about their particular gun, not just how to feed it and pull the trigger. And proper maintenance is one of them. And like I said, everyone will have their own way of doing theirs, as far as what they use for cleaning solutions, lubes, cleaning rods, patches, etc. And alot will depend on WHERE you are, as far as what works for you.

    I've used CLP for many years with no issues, and only until recently did I switch to SliP2000. Another that I used extensively are the products by Tetra Lube. Again, find what works for you, and make it a habit of using it.

    Even if you haven't shot your guns all winter, I would still make an effort to get them out and give them a wipe down with CLP, Rem Oil, whatever type of protectant you choose to use, maybe even run a patch or two down through the barrel. It doesn't take long to do, and will serve well to protect what you've spent $$$'s on.
     
  18. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    +1 plus the Otis bore cleaner is much easier on the nose.
     
  19. hillbilly68

    hillbilly68 New Member

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    Nah Slow, you know that wasnt directed towards you. Too many signs of competence in our discussions before ;)

    Its the cukoo-ness that exists out there on the disinformation net...elsewhere.

    Like the man said, even if you haven't shot them this winter (shame on you) get those investments out and show them some love :cool:
     
  20. slowryde45

    slowryde45 New Member

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    No probs ;) I just wanted to point out to the newer folks, or new to the AR or any guns for that matter, there's more to it than just feeding it and pulling the trigger. Just as there is more to it than buying one and dressing it up with every possible option and accessory out there, and yet not know how to clean and maintain it? :rolleyes:

    Read your manual IF you received one with your gun, if not, go on-line to the manufacturer's site and download it or at least read it there. Learn how to disassemble and reassemble for cleaning, and how to clean and lube your gun. Also read about any barrel break-in procedures they recommend or any particular type of lubes/cleaning solutions they may recommend or caution against using on your gun. Better to be safe than sorry, your warranty may depend on it. But even more important, your safety and your life (or those around you) could depend on it.

    At the very least, it will keep your gun in decent shape and working order. Will teach you how to get rid of things like 'carbon' deposits on the inside of your flash suppressor, or in and around your bolt, carrier group, chamber, and everywhere else. And teach you where, how much, and what kinds of cleaners, lubes, greases, oils, and protectants to use. And once you learn all that, remember to use it.

    Slo