Cooking in the woods/mountain

Discussion in 'Survival & Sustenance Living Forum' started by bizy, Apr 21, 2011.

  1. bizy

    bizy New Member

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    Do any of you have a propane burner and propane on your survival list?
     
  2. Ruger44

    Ruger44 New Member

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    Yep. It's the easiest way to cook if propane is available. I've had and used for years a simple 2 burner propane stve for years. In a pinch, just about any type of volitile fuel can be used to cook. A small piece of rag or paper towel placed in a small can which can be soaked with kerosene or rubbing alcohol or diesel makes a nifty little cooker. Of course, wood will work just fine when there's nothing else.
     

  3. fireguy

    fireguy New Member

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    You should try to have several options for cooking. First is what you normally use, gas or electric. Then you need to plan for if utilities are interrupted. I have a Coleman stove that will burn coleman fuel and propane with the adapter. I also have a Camp Chef two burner cooker that I can run from 20# bottles, I have two of those. Next is charcoal, I have 10 five gallon buckets stored with natural lump charcoal for emergency use. If it comes to it I can also burn wood in my smoker/grill.

    I am planning on building an adobe outdoor oven this summer, I want to try it for baking breads, meals and pizza.

    I try to pick up a two pack of 1# propane cylinders every month to store for an emergency. We were hit by an ice storm several years ago and I couldn't find the little bastiches anywhere, they were sold out as soon as they got to the stores. I only had a couple at the time and they ran out too fast.
    I know this is not woods/mountain, but I'm going to stay home as long as I can.
     
  4. BlindOldMan

    BlindOldMan New Member

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    :) It's not on my "survival list" as it is on my "cooking supply list". I use a propane burner ever couple days when I'm sitting outside. It's handy to make coffee, fry up a fish (so I don't have to run the fans in the house), and make my breakfast or dinner.
     
  5. dunerunner

    dunerunner New Member

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    I have a two burner propane stove, the propane oven and stove top in my motorhome, two Camp Chef single burner butane stoves. I have saved two #10 cans (from canned peaches) to use as a hobo stove if necessary, two 20# bags of charcoal, just in case and a fire starting kit in case I run out of the 20 boxes of strike anywhere matches I have in a dry vacuum sealed container.
     
  6. gregs887

    gregs887 New Member

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    Coleman dual fuel stove. All season fuel is pretty cheap compared to similar sized propane bottles, and in a pinch you can use regular unleaded gasoline as a substitute. Very cool toy.
     
  7. gregs887

    gregs887 New Member

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    This one runs off of coleman fuel, gasoline, and kerosene. Very cool...
     
  8. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    I have a Coleman dual burner propane stove. I pick up propane on a regular basis and have a decent stockpile.

    We've also got a Hibachi with some charcoal put back.

    I also keep a bunch of Sterno around. I have been putting off buying Esbit Stoves, but I plan on getting them and fuel soon.

    After we move, we'll also be buying a Barbecue or combination with a smoker. I think we'll stay with charcoal so we'll have more fuel options.
     
  9. mrm14

    mrm14 Active Member

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    I use this for backpacking.

    MSR DragonFly Backpacking Stove at REI.com

    I sacraficed a little weight with this stove when considering the total back pack weight but I like the white gas for cooking at higher altitudes. The feature I like the best about this stove is that you have good heat control compaired to other compressed gas stoves of this size. It's also a multi fuel stove.
     
  10. wmille01

    wmille01 New Member

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    I just have a single unit stove I can hook it up to either a small tank or one of the bigger ones. It kind of sucks but it's cooks ok enough.
     
  11. BlindOldMan

    BlindOldMan New Member

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    [​IMG]

    This is the one I have in my pack. It's low cost and reliable. You don't absolutely need the stand, but it's very helpful with larger pots and pans or if you have something heavy (like a pot of water).

    Also, do a search for tin can stove or hobo can stove. If you have a multi-tool with shears or a good blade and a punch (the 1/32" one in your kit for handgun repair is perfect) you can make one in about 15 minutes. It will run on isopropyl alcohol and other fuels.
     
  12. BlindOldMan

    BlindOldMan New Member

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    The Esbits are good in a pinch, but seem to make a sooty mess on my steel pans. I keep a few of them around though.

    I would like to make a coffee kit around some Sterno cans :). Funny enough, after seeing my share of hurricanes and power outages, the thing I missed most was always a good hot cup of coffee. I bought a single cup filter (looks like a small oil funnel) and when I'm outside it comes in handy. Takes about 10 minutes to make a cup.
     
  13. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    I have lots of backup for coffee. Two electric drip coffee makers, a large Melitta drip pot & filters, two of the single cup filters like yours and an old fashioned espresso pot. I've got to have my coffee.

    I do still need to pick up a percolator from a thrift store. :eek:

    I also need a griddle.
     
  14. jungleman

    jungleman New Member

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    O.K. I may upset a few here, but do you guys do REAL BUSHCRAFT, whereby you use what you find in the woods, and survive or do you lug loads of heavy gear ie cooking stoves etc. Anyone care to lay down a list of what you would take for say a 4 day trip into the woods, Ie Bivvy, Paracord, knives, I used plural, as I take 2, everytime. plus the usual fire starting items.etc.

    Jungleman.
     
  15. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    I don't really know much about "bushcraft". I've done a bunch of hiking and backpacking in my life. Now that I'm older, I go "camping".

    Quite honestly, If I'm left in the woods with nothing, I don't think I'll fare all that well. However, I've planned for most eventualities and I believe I'll be okay.

    Why not start a new thread about bushcraft? You can make it a "how to". I know that I'd read it to learn new skills.
     
  16. jungleman

    jungleman New Member

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    O.K. I will give it twirl and see how it goes. Please bear in mind I do NOT know it all, and don't pretend to, one never ceases to learn, from the day he is born till the day he dies.

    Jungleman
     
  17. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    Go for it. The prevailing attitude around here is that we can all learn from each other.

    BTW, I just started a suggested reading thread in survival/preps based on our PM's yesterday.
     
  18. BlindOldMan

    BlindOldMan New Member

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    I pack pretty heavy. I've done a few canoe trips from Florida city up along the Everglades, Ocala, a couple spots in Georgia some years ago, and miscellaneous other places for two to three days. Weight is an issue. In most places we can park and then do a short hike (2-3 miles) to the camp site so carrying 40lbs of gear is not so bad. Any further than that and the fun factor goes down a whole lot.

    I almost always carry a gallon of water in the main pack and 1/2 gallon in the front. That accounts for the majority of the weight. If you can find potable water (or make it potable) then you can save a lot of weight. Getting used to drinking tea-colored water is a process though. Even with a Katadyn or other filter it still doesn't look "clean", but after boiling should be fine though may be a bit salty or bitter. I usually just make coffee from it and then that's only if my grocery store water supply is out.

    Other than that, I have a small tent (either 1 person sleeper or a 4-person if my family is along with me), sleeping bag, cooking equipment and emergency food. The cooking equipment is cheap and a bit flimsy, but also lightweight. I've had them for about five years and they haven't busted yet. In some places there are bans on open fires so either carry a heavy metal pot or use a mini camp stove. I went with the single burner camp stove.

    I applaud folks who go out there with less, but that part of my life is over :D I'm more interested in fishing by a river than duking it out with Nature :/.

    As for knives, I used to carry a Gerber LMF II, Buck Nighthawk, or a Gerber Prodigy. Recently I've been carrying just a Mora knife. This is a consequence of not needing to gather firewood (because of the mentioned open fire ban).

    And I confess that I also carry a GPS unit (in addition to my compass and map). And a couple lighters alongside my matches. Toilet paper, toothbrush/paste, baby wipes, drink flavor packets, etc.. I carry some rope for hanging up clothes and replacement shoelaces, etc..

    Don't get me wrong, I enjoy getting closer to Nature, but if I have to sleep one more night with some beetle crawling up my nose I'm going to go batty. And mosquitoes.. geez. Sometimes they get so thick that you can literally swing your hand through the air and get two or three of them in your hand.
     
  19. mrm14

    mrm14 Active Member

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    My load lbs. for a 15 day treck for just me is just under 40 lbs. I can feed myself for this time without supplementing off the land. I do, however, suppliment off the land during these trecks and have food left over when I'm done with these 15 or so day trecks. Now if I take my 7 Y.O. grandson I end up having to ramp my packweight to 50 lbs. or so to accomodate his load. Thats fine because it's his learning time.

    We usually hike the PCT (Pacific Coast Trail) and bail off to go to high alitiude lakes and streams to get fish. We also know the plants we can eat and cook them up as well. It's all good times and we like it. My 7 Y.O. grandson has become quite the trout slayer and we eat well when on these trecks.

    I'll have to say that last year I upgraded all my back packing gear to new modern light weight high tech good stuff. It had been since the early 70's and through the early 80's that I had made these trips with the old stuff. Getting rid of the old heavy not so efficient stuff was amazing with whats available now.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2011
  20. BlindOldMan

    BlindOldMan New Member

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    Hehe.. Now you are prepared for all eventualities, sir.


    A griddle is an idea. My daughter would be thrilled if I made up some waffles outside.