Colt Single Action Army in .357

Discussion in 'Revolver Handguns' started by SingleAction, May 10, 2009.

  1. SingleAction

    SingleAction New Member

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    i recenently purchased a colt SAA chambered in .357 mag. Shortly after the buy i was talking to a friend of mine and he told me a story about .357 mag colts having reliability issues due to the fact that the frame was originially designed for the stress of the .45 long colt. he said that the frame can weaken and that critical parts (revolver drum, barrel.) can need replacing after 10000 shots. Does anyone have any input?
     
  2. matt g

    matt g New Member Supporter

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    You're planning to fire an old SAA?
     

  3. JiroZero713

    JiroZero713 Active Member

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    [​IMG]

    It's the greatest handgun ever maaade.
     
  4. SingleAction

    SingleAction New Member

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    yeah. its just a third gen assembly line colt SAA. i have always been a fan of single action revolvers, and after purchasing a tarus nock off i decided that there is nothing like a pony
     
  5. Bob Wright

    Bob Wright Member

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    Shoot the thing! The Colt SAA is rugged enough for the .357 Magnum round.

    The only trouble I ever had with a .357 Mag. Colt SAA was my own, which had been customized with the addition of a Smith & Wesson rear sight. Removing metal to install the sight weakened the top strap so that it stretched from my heavy bullet loads.

    An unaltered Colt SAA is fine with all .357 Rounds.

    Bob Wright
     
  6. Virginian

    Virginian Active Member

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    Everyone owes it to themselves to have at least one Colt SAA before they die. Shoot away with any .357 rounds. There is a whole lot more steel left to surround those 38 sized rounds than there is when she is bored out to 45.
     
  7. SingleAction

    SingleAction New Member

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    so there wont be any ill effects from the much higher power of the .357?
    i did a little research and found out that it puts alot more stress on the frame then 45 long colt but couldnt find anything about potential effects on the infrastructure.
    im just cautious because i have never paid close to as much for a peice as for this colt. gotta be careful
     
  8. Bob Wright

    Bob Wright Member

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    I don't believe the .357 Magnum puts that much more stress on the frame than the .45 Colt, this just from my observations and experience.

    The .357 Magnum is a high pressure round, to be sure. But I don't believe pressure, within reason, is that much of a culprit in revolvers. Certainly pressures can be elevated to the point that cylinders bulge or rupture, but pressures that are within the working limits of the cartridge are safely contained by the chamber walls.

    From my experience, recoil is the greater adversary. Recoil causes battering of the internal parts and of the cylinder within the frame's "window" for the cylinder. All parts mush ahve some clearance, or "slack" for smooth operation. This slack results in battering of the components under recoil. And, heavy bullets contribute far greater recoil, such as the 255 gr. slug ov the .45 compared to the 158 gr. bullet of the .36 calibers.

    Of the guns that I have had break down, most have been the big .44s and .45s. The only failures I have had with .357 Magnums were the stretched frame of my Colt SAA and the sheared off ejector rod housing screw of my Ruger Blackhawk. Most of my .44s have had the ejector rod housing screw shear off, not once but several times. Also, the ratchett has imprinted itself into the standing breech, requiring some stoning down of these parts. Bear in mind most of my guns have been fired in excess of 10,000~15,000 rounds.
    AQnd, the Colt that failed had been customized to the point the topstrap had been weakened, and I had been shooting hot .357 Magnum ammmunition built around 175~180gr bullet weights.

    Again I say, shoot that .357 Magnum SAA.

    Bob Wright
     
  9. SingleAction

    SingleAction New Member

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    thanks for the help. i have been itching to use this thing. Just to be safe ill stick to .38 spl at the range and lower grain .357 in the great outdoors. i hope to enjoy this pistol for 20000+ and eventually make it a family heirloom. maybe thats just wishful thinking though.
    again your expertise is appreciated
     
  10. skyking68

    skyking68 New Member

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    SAA Colt

    Shoot It! and enjoy it. No problem with the .357.
    I have a couple of SAA 7 1/2 .45s. I have been Thinking about a Colt 357 because the cartridges are less $. I have a Ruger, but the Colt is so much more American and American History. A Colt should be shot unless one has the $$ just to collect spares and look at them.
     
  11. chucksolo69

    chucksolo69 New Member

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    I have a Colt SAA .357 that I bought in 1978. I have about 300 rnds through it mixing about 90% .38 Special to 10% .357 Magnums. I only shoot the Magnums if I am out in the field hunting, and even then, I rarely shoot it out there. I think I have fired it twice at coyotes while hunting in the Imperial Valley in SoCal. Shooting the standard .38 Specials out of this gun produces almost no recoil and accuracy is outstanding. This last weekend I shot a 5 shot group that was 3 shots in 1" and 2 fliers opened the group up to 2.25 inches. I say shoot it, but stick with the .38 Specials and the gun will last forever!
     
  12. GaryOwen

    GaryOwen New Member

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    I've been collecting Colt firearms for over twenty years now, and in my opinion, the Colt SAA, and the Colt Model 1911, are the two finest, most recognizable, and most successful handguns ever produced anywhere. I have old and new models of each, and while I enjoy shooting my model 1911 pistols, I keep my older models oiled and kept in a safe, along with mu SAA revolvers. They are a very valuable part of my collection, and are not for shooting.
     
  13. chucksolo69

    chucksolo69 New Member

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    Wow, that's too bad because I won't own a gun I can't shoot. I believe most of those "collectibles" you see in the pages of the American Rifleman are basically useless if you are afraid to shoot them. But, if that's your thing, more power too you.
     
  14. OC357

    OC357 New Member

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    That Colt SSA was made to shoot .357 magnum so go and shoot it and then shoot it some more.

    OC