Colt Python .357

Discussion in 'Revolver Handguns' started by Tackleberry1, Mar 20, 2010.

  1. Tackleberry1

    Tackleberry1 New Member

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    Need some advice from you revolver guru's. I'm looking to expand my handgun collection and yesterday I came accross a blued colt python .375 w/6" barrel. The gun looks to have the original colt wood stocks, and finish is 90%.
    The SN has no Letter in front of the number and is in the 64000 range. My dealer tells me he took it in on trade from a kid who inherited it and swapped it for a auto...
    Dealer also told me that being "pre letter" and in the 64000 range make it a mid to late 1960's production run. "I love tight old guns with a little wear".
    No box or paperwork and the dealer is asking $695.00. The price seems fair to me but I'm new to revolvers and just don't know if I'm looking at a great deal, a fair deal, or what?:confused:

    Any advice on the value of this purchase would be appreciated...
     
  2. NGIB

    NGIB New Member

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    They are probably the prettiest revolvers ever built. My Dad had 2 of them and I used to just admire them. Two things of note - Pythons are kind of "delicate" and finding a smith to work on them is difficult. I suspect most Pythons sit in display cases versus being shot for these reasons. Yeah, I'd probably grab it for that price...
     

  3. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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    Bad choice! Would you buy the puppy and send it to me? I'm the only one that knows how to fix it.

    On a serious note, you could, depending on the condition, flip this for $1,000 +.

    I have been searching for a Python to complete my 'bucket list' and it sounds like you may have a real find.

    Canebrake says, "Buy it!" You will be hard pressed to find a higher quality vintage .357 Mag than the storied Colt Python! If it turns out that you don't like it I will take it off your hands for your purchase price + shipping to me.

    There's a deal you'd be hard to pass-up.
     
  4. lonyaeger

    lonyaeger New Member

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    I ordered directly from Colt in 1993 a Python with 6-inch barrel in Bright Stainless finish. I paid $903 back then. Unfortunate boating accident. I'd hate to think what one would go for now. :(

    If you don't buy it....I WILL!
     
  5. Mark F

    Mark F New Member Supporter

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    Just plain beautiful...
     

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  6. TheOldMan

    TheOldMan New Member

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    There was never a better looking finish than that Colt Royal Blue.

    By all means, BUY IT!!
     
  7. superc

    superc Member

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    Buy it! Don't even haggle over it.

    Pythons were made on the Official Police frame, but received special polishing and attention to internal parts fitting, adjustable sights were added and zeroed, then blued with the Royal Blue. Colt made the Python for decades, but unquestionably the ones dating from the 60s are amongst the nicest. Back then the NYPD was a .38 only PD but owning a Python was every officer's dream. Several NY cops I knew in 70s owned a Python and/or carried the Diamondback 38 variant. It wasn't at all unusual to hear of one being taken deer hunting. Colt quality started slipping in the 70s and while they have made numerous efforts to regain lost ground, the efforts were spotty at best. Pre 70s Pythons are amongst the most enjoyable of guns to shoot, carry, or just look at.

    It should be noted that one time Colt ran an armorers school for pistol smiths. If enough sales were made by a dealership Colt would extend them an invitation to become a warranty repair station. The dealer's Gunsmiths would pay to go there then upon graduation be issued special tools and a pretty little window sign declaring them to be an authorized Colt repair facility. I believe the program ended back in the 80s as Colt had decided to focus on the M-16 rather than compete with S&W. The only drawback to shooting a Python (or any Colt revolver) a lot (as in 4,000 rounds or so) was the revolver timing hand would eventually wear down, and that is when you would bring it to the warranty station to have a new hand fitted and the gun retimed, then it was good for another 4,000 rounds or so.
     
  8. freefall

    freefall New Member

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    Wish I could find a deal like that.
     
  9. Glasshartt

    Glasshartt New Member

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    Too bad they don't well them at Wal-mart anymore.
     
  10. Wambli

    Wambli New Member

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    One of the most BEAUTIFUL handguns ever made. I LOVE mine.

    [​IMG]

    Price seems fair, I'd buy it. Heck the grips on that gun alone are worth a few hundred dollars.
     
  11. Gojubrian

    Gojubrian New Member

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    I just looked at my uncle's Colt Anaconda and Python tonight. OH MY GOODNESS!!!! :eek: super :cool:
     
  12. TGReaper

    TGReaper New Member

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    Love my Colts

    I bought my Python new in 1967 Ser# in the 56000's

    [​IMG]

    TGR
     
  13. Tackleberry1

    Tackleberry1 New Member

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    So...

    Colt would have had to produce 8000 Pythons between 1967 and 1969 for the one I'm looking at to be 60's vinatage...Hmm...
    Think I'll call Colt customer service monday morning for the production date window on the 64000 SN guns.

    Thanks Reaper.
     
  14. lonyaeger

    lonyaeger New Member

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    Okay....but I wouldn't let it get away!
     
  15. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

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    I don't want to be a buzz killer and I'm not bashing the Python, I'd buy it by the way, but I just can't get excited about Colt revolvers. I know the Python and Anaconda and would buy either since their value will only go up. I just can't stand Colt's cylinder release and I can't see anything they have over my Smiths. Am I missing something?
     
  16. Mark F

    Mark F New Member Supporter

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    YES.

    Python, Anaconda, and King Cobra will eat a perpetual diet of magnum loads and not experience ill-effects, unlike S&W. The cylinder release is nothing more than getting used to it, just like you did with the S&W.

    I love S&W's and I own many. I also own several Colts... guess which ones' get shot most often with hot-magnum loads?
     
  17. TheOldMan

    TheOldMan New Member

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    Not so sure I agree with that assesment Mark. Smith's are well known for being able to eat lots and lots of ammo without any ill effects. the 686 is a classic example of that (imo) and of course the Mod. 19 and 29's

    I do agree with you on the cyclinder release though. It's just one of the hallmarks of a Colt. Very unique to them..
     
  18. NGIB

    NGIB New Member

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    The 19/66 are known not to be able to handle a steady diet of the light hot .357 loads. The Colts are not affected and you can shoot all the 125 gr you want...
     
  19. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

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    What about Ruger?

    I don't feed my S&W 19 any light magnums but it loves 158gr. Haven't had my 629 long enough to say but all I feed it is magnums.
     
  20. superc

    superc Member

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    No argument that a Colt MK III coil spring action is inferior in trigger smoothness in comparison to an S&W trigger pull. The debate between Smith vs. Colt however extended back to the days when Colts had leaf mainsprings. The trigger pull was different. There was a phenomena called loading, i.e., is the force required to work the action constant, or does it change as the trigger moves. Many shooters considered the old Colts to have smoother trigger pulls especially when doing 25 yard target shooting. Around the same time as Colt decided to go with cheaper coil springs S&W was working on smoothing out their trigger actions. The debate is not about how your new Colt stacks up against a new S&W. Nor is it about who's factory sights are nicer. Colt has conceded the debate by virtually abandoning the field. The debate was about the older guns. Which was nicer to shoot, a Colt Shooting Master in .38 or an S&W 38/44? An Official Police or a Victory Model? Each had adherents for varied reasons. Enclosed ejector rod vs. exposed, etc. When modern police departments dropped the revolvers and went with DA 9mms from other manufacturers Colt turned their back on all pistoleros, ignored them and focused on plastic rifles instead. In today's world the debate is S&W vs. Ruger vs. Llama vs. Taurus, et al.

    If you want to compare a Python to a Smith & Wesson pistol the only equivalently sized S&W .357 was the model 19 of the same year's manufacture. L frames aren't in that running as the frame is different. Most people who have shot and handled both the 19-1 or 19-2 and the older Pythons will vote for the Python.
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2010