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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New to this forum & proud 2A, CWP holder here.

I inherited this Colt from my father many years ago, and am now in the process of tracking down which family member may have owned it.

At any rate, I've looked at a some posts and note that I should make sure serial numbers match (I'm pretty sure they will), & also see that I can contact Colt for original shipping receipts, which is fascinating to me. I'd like to compile as much information as possible to maintain and hand-down to my future generations.

Here are some pics. If anyone has anything to add, recommendations for time-period weapons research, please educate me! I'm excited to learn more about this special piece.
Hand tool Bag Tool Dagger Knife
Tool Wood Hand tool Nickel Metal
Air gun Trigger Grey Revolver Natural material
Door handle Nickel Silver Badge Jewellery
Air gun Revolver Shotgun Trigger Bumper
Air gun Wood Shotgun Automotive exhaust Automotive exterior

Hand tool Bag Tool Dagger Knife
Tool Wood Hand tool Nickel Metal
Air gun Trigger Grey Revolver Natural material
Door handle Nickel Silver Badge Jewellery
Air gun Revolver Shotgun Trigger Bumper
Air gun Wood Shotgun Automotive exhaust Automotive exterior
 

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Welcome to the forum- glad you found us! When you get a minute, stop by the Introductions thread and say howdy.

Very nice Colt- am not a specialist in them, but think that may be an M1877. That was the first double action CARTRIDGE revolver- they were unoffcially known as the Rainmaker, Thunderer and Lightning models, depending on caliber. Preferred gun of John Wesley Hardin, Billy the Kid and Doc Holliday. The ,41 is the "Thunderer".

A Colt letter may be able to give you the name/ address of the DEALER the gun was shipped to (Ajax Hardware, Punkin Center KS) but rarely the name of the individual purchaser. But good luck with that.

One note of caution... well, actually, two notes. First, these predated smokeless powder. I would NOT fire that with modern ammo. Second, these were known as "The Gunsmith's Dream". The design was.... less than robust. They were prone to breaking in the double action mode- could still be shot in single action mode. Just a design that put a lot of stress on some small parts. For that reason would not recommend dry-firing those.

As a bit of your family history- priceless. And congratulations!
 

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B Graham
C-3 is spot on as always!
For its age and condition it is in fine shape! What ever you do leave it in the exact state it is in!;)
Not that you plan on ever selling it and I am the same with my family Heirlooms. But if you try to clean off all the rust or any work on it other than maybe running a patch through the Barrel and Cylinders w/ #9 to clean them. And then lubricate them. Or by Wiping off the outside with a quality product like Hoppes #9 or Shooters Choice or other gun solvent and then followed by a lubricant to protect it. Anything else can and will destroy the importance of the Revolver's Originality!
So if you are not familiar with weapons which it is only my assumption???
Get some 1" Gun Cleaning Patches patches or cut them out of an old soft cotton, like an old T-Shirt
So here is what you probably need and in the following Order of use.
Cleaning Rod (Inexpensive from places like Walmart - Aluminum only! (NO steel!)
Patches 1" "Cotton"
Solvent
(Like Mentioned, just lightly wipe All surfaces including in the Barrel and the Cylinders) *No Scrubbing! and wipe off until dry.
Lubricant
( A good Quality Lubricant on separate patches - You only need a small size of the above items. Like a Little Bottle of Breakfree. But if you use Breakfree be sure to shake the bottle before using it. It has a tendency to separate into three parts if setting for a long time. Slip 2000 or any good quality gun lubricant. But I would shake all lubricants up before using it to lubricate the parts.

But the main other important thing is to be sure and keep it in a dry environment! If you do that the Lubricant should protect it until your next periodic cleaning. For example I completely clean all my weapons sometimes every 6 months and for sure every year. Even though most of them are in a climate controlled Safe! And finally my thought to keep the Revolver n a secure place.
Those Relics are far a few between!;)
By the way, very nice piece! I am sure you are very glad you have it!
I certainly would be!
Thank you for the Pictures!


03
 
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Made in 1892. I have to disagree with C3 on being a "Gunsmiths Dream", more like job security, because they are not a dream to work on! Colt really didn't plan this model out very well, making their first double action, and that's what usually breaks. Here's some info on a Colt letter:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you
Welcome to the forum- glad you found us! When you get a minute, stop by the Introductions thread and say howdy.

Very nice Colt- am not a specialist in them, but think that may be an M1877. That was the first double action CARTRIDGE revolver- they were unoffcially known as the Rainmaker, Thunderer and Lightning models, depending on caliber. Preferred gun of John Wesley Hardin, Billy the Kid and Doc Holliday. The ,41 is the "Thunderer".

A Colt letter may be able to give you the name/ address of the DEALER the gun was shipped to (Ajax Hardware, Punkin Center KS) but rarely the name of the individual purchaser. But good luck with that.

One note of caution... well, actually, two notes. First, these predated smokeless powder. I would NOT fire that with modern ammo. Second, these were known as "The Gunsmith's Dream". The design was.... less than robust. They were prone to breaking in the double action mode- could still be shot in single action mode. Just a design that put a lot of stress on some small parts. For that reason would not recommend dry-firing those.

As a bit of your family history- priceless. And congratulations!


Thank you ffor your insight! Much appreciated
B Graham
C-3 is spot on as always!
For its age and condition it is in fine shape! What ever you do leave it in the exact state it is in!;)
Not that you plan on ever selling it and I am the same with my family Heirlooms. But if you try to clean off all the rust or any work on it other than maybe running a patch through the Barrel and Cylinders w/ #9 to clean them. And then lubricate them. Or by Wiping off the outside with a quality product like Hoppes #9 or Shooters Choice or other gun solvent and then followed by a lubricant to protect it. Anything else can and will destroy the importance of the Revolver's Originality!
So if you are not familiar with weapons which it is only my assumption???
Get some 1" Gun Cleaning Patches patches or cut them out of an old soft cotton, like an old T-Shirt
So here is what you probably need and in the following Order of use.
Cleaning Rod (Inexpensive from places like Walmart - Aluminum only! (NO steel!)
Patches 1" "Cotton"
Solvent
(Like Mentioned, just lightly wipe All surfaces including in the Barrel and the Cylinders) *No Scrubbing! and wipe off until dry.
Lubricant
( A good Quality Lubricant on separate patches - You only need a small size of the above items. Like a Little Bottle of Breakfree. But if you use Breakfree be sure to shake the bottle before using it. It has a tendency to separate into three parts if setting for a long time. Slip 2000 or any good quality gun lubricant. But I would shake all lubricants up before using it to lubricate the parts.

But the main other important thing is to be sure and keep it in a dry environment! If you do that the Lubricant should protect it until your next periodic cleaning. For example I completely clean all my weapons sometimes every 6 months and for sure every year. Even though most of them are in a climate controlled Safe! And finally my thought to keep the Revolver n a secure place.
Those Relics are far a few between!;)
By the way, very nice piece! I am sure you are very glad you have it!
I certainly would be!
Thank you for the Pictures!


03

Wow, thank you for the suggestions! More good news for me and yes, you're correct to assume I know 'zilch' about this beauty. I'm more inspired than ever now to get more familiar with the cleaning and maintenance process...
 

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They used to make (and still might) "cowboy loads" in this caliber which were just mildly loaded cartridges which should be perfectly safe to shoot in your revolver. I have shot (and worked on) many of that model gun.
 

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hiwall makes a good point, but ammo is going to be scarce. Known as the .41 LDA (Long, double action), it is about as scarce as an honest politician. Looks like this-

Ruler Office ruler Tool Measuring instrument Cylinder
 
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