Colt Challenger

Discussion in 'General Handgun Discussion' started by blucoondawg, Jun 25, 2014.

  1. blucoondawg

    blucoondawg New Member

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    I am going to try to sell a Colt Challenger that was my father in law's. Serial number indicates 1951 mfg. It shoots fine. It has wood grips which I don't know if those are original or not. I see many on gunbroker that have factory plastic colt emblem grips. The frame is perfect and the left side of the gun in nice but there are some pretty good size rust pits on the right side of the barrel and right side of the slide.

    How bad will this effect the value? Do you think I could get 250 out of it for a plinker or does the rust damage it further than that?
     

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  2. hardluk1

    hardluk1 Active Member

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    Should be able to get 250 with little effort if the bores nice. Looks cleanup from the photos so atleast cold blue and buff then oil well. I would keep it for myself . Will still make a great tree rat getter.
     

  3. blucoondawg

    blucoondawg New Member

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    Yes it is very nice other than the couple real bad spots. Keeping it is an option but the point is to sell off the collection for the mother in law so she can make a few bucks, which I totally disagree with but it is her collection since he died so she can do what she pleases I guess. We are keeping family guns for sure but any of these sort of guns I would have to come up with a value and pay for and there are many that I am growing attached to. I also found 2 buntlines I am thinking I have to acquire and of course a couple Winchester rifles so this whole selling off the collection could be quite damaging to my pocket book.
     
  4. blucoondawg

    blucoondawg New Member

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    Forgive my ignorance on the issue but I have never done it before, what is cold blue is that like the Birchwood Casey Perma Blue product? And what would you buff with? I had a friend fix a spot on my 22-250 one time with perma blue and it looks decent but I do not recall what he did.
     
  5. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    yes, the Perma Blue is a cold blue product. most of the products sold in gun stores for the DIYer are cold blue products.

    short answer. you clean the area well that needs touched up. buff with some very fine steel wool. apply the cold blue to the intended area, (some like to use Q-Tips for this) let dry, repeat the number of applications until the desired color is reashed. some need to be rinsed with warm water and then dried to neutralize the chemicals. then buff out with a cloth or very fine steel wool and oil.

    there are different brands of cold blueing and some are better than others. cold blueing is good for small repairs, but isn't a substitute for a proper hot blueing job.
     
  6. hardluk1

    hardluk1 Active Member

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    Way to go axxe55

    Try to run a few rounds thru that colt and you may have to buy it.
     
  7. blucoondawg

    blucoondawg New Member

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    I have ran some through it wanted to be sure it functions in case I sell it or decide to buy it. It's a nice little shooter but idk how many I really need to buy. I am well aware of the can't have to many philosophy but in reality I won't have time to shoot them all and it's just more to upkeep
     
  8. DrFootball

    DrFootball disappointed & disgusted, But DETERMINED... Lifetime Supporter

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    Let me know if you decide to sell....I'd want to at least have a crack at it


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