Coal Mogul is Dying Broke

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by alsaqr, Oct 3, 2020.

  1. alsaqr

    alsaqr Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Robert Murray, CEO of Murray Energy, fought federal mine health and safety for decades. He especially fought federal black lung rules. Murray, who is dying broke, filed for black lung benefits.

    Yep, Karma is a 6itch.
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2020
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  2. sheepdawg

    sheepdawg Well-Known Member Supporter

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    After what Obama did to the coal business I'm not surprised many of it's executives are broke.

    You seem to think the guy deserved it.
     

  3. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Gator, ya gotta remember that AL is a BIG supporter of government regulations, the more the better. He even supports OSHA!
     
  4. alsaqr

    alsaqr Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yep, who in hell would want work place safety rules. Just put those Mexican workers in 10-15 feet deep trenches without shoring. The City of Lawton did that a few years ago, the fire department took a long time to safely extract the worker alive. He died a few days later from compression injuries to his legs.

    i knew a retired EOD man was hired on the ground floor at OSHA. He helped put the screws to a construction company whose cooling tower collapsed killing 51 workers, the worst construction disaster in US history. The forms were moved up in preparation pf pouring concrete. Big problem, the previous pour had not hardened.

    https://eng-resources.uncc.edu/failurecasestudies/other-failure-cases/willow-island-cooling-tower/

    i worked UXO remediation on New Jersey site where the homes under construction had roofs of 7 and higher pitch. One morning a Mexican roofer who was not tied off slid about five feet and went though a skylight thumping the floor about fifty feet below.
     
  5. sheepdawg

    sheepdawg Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I had a big customer, a metal fabricator who painted his stuff at the factory. I got a phone call from him one morning saying that OSHA had just shut his paint department down, his paint booth had to much overspray on the walls and floors. I had to wonder just what the OSHA bureaucrat expected to find on the walls and floor of a paint booth.:confused:

    I think that's the OSHA Locutus is talking about.
     
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  6. microadventure

    microadventure Well-Known Member

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    bottom line is, nobody takes anything with them when they go.
     
  7. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I remember the OSHA azzholes during a compliance and telling us to "Demonstrate how to safely walk up a flight of stairs."

    Another one was "Demonstrate how to safely carry a folding knife on your belt."

    Our bomb squad guys were asked to "Demonstrate how to properly inspect a pair of electrical pliers to assure they are safe to use."

    And we were told that we should take these idiotic scumbags seriously!
     
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  8. sheepdawg

    sheepdawg Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Back in the good old days often the owner of the company I worked for, a bigtime customer of mine and I hooked up in the owner's office and started doing some serious paint business drinking. Legendary OSHA stories usually became a topic about thirty minutes after the first cork was pulled.
     
  9. Ghost1958

    Ghost1958 Well-Known Member

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    Living in what was once a coal boom area , having worked mines and hauled Lord knows how many tons of the stuff, I've seen alot of folks become fast multi millionaires in a years time and be flat busted two years later.
    OSHA like most other things government regulation wise was needed to start with but went power mad and got ridiculous in a short time.
     
  10. woodlander

    woodlander Active Member Lifetime Supporter

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    It is, indeed, a classic story.
     
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  11. G66enigma

    G66enigma Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Doesn't surprise me.

    Lots of safety steps cost a fortune. As a business decision, I can see even a knowledgeable person in the industry fighting to avoid such costs.

    Yet, nothing but stiff precautions and the luck of the cards allow a person to escape the ravages of such diseases. Particularly if working the "deep coal" for years.
     
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  12. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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  13. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I refused to work off of a dangerous scaffold one time and the crew was making fun of me until a guy that was watching stepped up and cited them all. Was not so funny then.
     
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  14. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Osha accident report.
    Dear Sir,

    I am writing in response to your request for additional information in Block #3 of the accident reporting form. I put "Poor Planning" as the cause of my accident. You asked for a fuller explanation and I trust the following details will be sufficient.

    I am a bricklayer by trade. On the day of the accident, I was working alone on the roof of a new six-story building. When I completed my work, I found I had some bricks left over which when weighed later were found to weigh 240 lbs. Rather than carry the bricks down by hand, I decided to lower them in a barrel by using a pulley which was attached to the side of the building at the sixth floor.

    Securing the rope at ground level, I went up to the roof, swung the barrel out and loaded the bricks into it. Then I went down and untied the rope, holding it tightly to insure a slow descent of the 240 lbs of bricks. You will note on the accident reporting form that my weight is 135 lbs. Due to my surprise at being jerked off the ground so suddenly, I lost my presence of mind and forgot to let go of the rope. Needless to say, I proceeded at a rapid rate up the side of the building.

    In the vicinity of the third floor, I met the barrel which was now proceeding downward at an equally impressive speed. This explains the fractured skull, minor abrasions and the broken collarbone, as listed in Section 3, accident reporting form. Slowed only slightly, I continued my rapid ascent, not stopping until the fingers of my right hand were two knuckles deep into the pulley which I mentioned in Paragraph 2 of this correspondence. Fortunately by this time I had regained my presence of mind and was able to hold tightly to the rope, in spite of the excruciating pain I was now beginning to experience.

    At approximately the same time, however, the barrel of bricks hit the ground and the bottom fell out of the barrel. Now devoid of the weight of the bricks, the barrel weighed approximately 50 lbs. I refer you again to my weight. As you might imagine, I began a rapid descent down the side of the building. In the vicinity of the third floor, I met the barrel coming up. This accounts for the two fractured ankles, broken tooth and severe lacerations of my legs and lower body.

    Here my luck began to change slightly. The encounter with the barrel seemed to slow me enough to lessen my injuries when I fell into the pile of bricks and fortunately only three vertebrae were cracked.

    I am sorry to report, however, as I lay there on the pile of bricks, in pain, unable to move and watching the empty barrel six stories above me, I again lost my composure and presence of mind and let go of the rope. And I lay there watching the empty barrel begin its journey back onto me.

    -----
    Brought to you by - The 'Lectric Law Library
    The Net's Finest Legal Resource For Legal Pros & Laypeople Alike.
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  15. jigs-n-fixture

    jigs-n-fixture Well-Known Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Every OSHA regulation is in response to frequent or fatal accidents. they don’t just make up rules. They analyze what kills and maims people and develop regulations in response to them.

    Want to guess what one of their more frequent violations are?

    Failure to have the manuals for equipment onsite. Which at first glance seems pretty silly. But, they need to have them available to verify you were actually operating the equipment involved in compliance with the manufacturers safety instructions.

    I’ve probably had as much involvement with OSHA as anyone who isn’t the Safety Buffalo. Two amputations, three embolizing injuries from paint sprayers, a framer falling off the top plate, a roofer nailing himself to the roof to avoid falling from a second story roof, all in one year.

    And then coming to work for an employer, whose Safety Officer, had snitched them off to OSHA, resulting in a 120 page list of violations. Which I had to spend three years correcting, and meeting with OSHA every two weeks.

    So, I came to understand that every rule they have is there in response to deaths or injuries.

    It does matter how your multi tools is hung on your belt. The wrong orientation or position can cause damage to your lower back. And, how you do things matters. You can unknowingly be doing things unsafely, with out realizing it.
     
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  16. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member Admin Moderator Lifetime Supporter

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    Well..... have 30 years in the safety field- OSHA and MSHA instructor, and somewhere around here have the framed certificate as a Certified Safety Professional. Company that I retired from as the Safety God was a Consulting Engineering firm. Each year we had about 15,000 different customers, and each day we would send our staff by ones and twos out to different sites- a bridge 200 ft above the Chesapeake, or a tunnel 50 ft below it. And everything in between. Have some pictures taken of me in 48 inch coal- about 3,000 ft back in the mountain.


    Deal I had with our folks- you all have a company smart phone- and you are smart people. If there is a situation where it does not look safe to you, take a picture, send me an email, We WILL get it resolved. You ALWAYS have the right to refuse unsafe work, and we WILL back you up.

    Results? Sometimes it was "Yeah, I know that looks weird, but that is actually OK. It works like this...." sometimes it was me on the phone with the general contractor, explaining why I had just pulled my engineer (shutting down their work) and sending the picture to them. Sometimes a bad scaffold- or a bad excavation, or lack of clearance for our drill rig and an overhead line.

    The big customers- the ENR top 400- loved us. They knew they were lucrative targets for the regulators. The smaller ones- after explaining what the problem was, and what to do with it- almost always appreciated the help. Yes, have had a few regulators that did know their own stuff- THAT I could handle just fine, thanks. Heh heh heh!

    This week I am standing in for my replacement- he is having surgery, called and asked if I could cover for him in an emergency. Don't mind a bit- I left that company with a nice plaque hanging in the lobby- for one million man hours with no lost time.
     
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  17. sheriffjohn

    sheriffjohn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Can't remember OSHA ever covering much in corrections nor law enforcement as far as employee safety. Example - prison "farm" with 200 inmates, 2 officers on duty midnight to day shift. If one got sick there was one. Jails with one officer also working as dispatcher.

    New jail, all electric controls. Generator located inside jail caught fire. Door locks, everything inoperable. In jail fires, smoke does the killing. Memory is fading but several died inside.

    State mental hospital cut maintenace staff, used patients to perform jobs. College intern beaten to death with a metal mop bucket handle. Lawsuits often follow but don't do anything for the victims.
     
  18. Rifling82

    Rifling82 Well-Known Member Supporter

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  19. alsaqr

    alsaqr Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yep, posters on boards who have never, ever worked on an OSHA job are experts on OSHA compliance. Go figure. i never had any problem complying with federal or state laws/rules.

    i had a big fuss with a COE idiot who ordered the cleanup of a mouse/rat infested bunker without proper PPE. The state epidemiologist took care of him.

    About 20 years ago a demolition company had a contract to raze buildings on a former military base in Ohio. The demolition company was owned by an immigrant known for doing dumb stuff. They hired a close friend as site safety person.

    After a few days on site my friend quit because the company owner bucked everything pertaining to safety. Company hired a recently retired senior Air Force NCO as site safety. To make a long story short the crane operator pulled down a building killing two workers inside.

    Murray Energy bought a company that owned the Crandall Canyon, Utah mine. While robbing pillars, a pillar exploded resulting in the deaths of six miners. About ten days later another collapse caused the death of three rescuers, including a MSHA inspector. Ultimately most of the mine collapsed. MSHA fined Murray Energy about one million dollars.

    Murray claimed earthquakes caused the collapse of the mine. Not so, the mine collapses caused the seismic events. Murray went into a rant. i deleted the Socialist Workers hate piece.

    MSHA:

    https://arlweb.msha.gov/Genwal/ccSummary.asp

    https://www.cbsnews.com/pictures/utah-mine-collapse/7/

    Never met a coal miner who ever saw a mine roof supported in that manner. The fact that the chain link is used overhead denotes a bad roof.

    i worked for six months in an underground WV coal mine. Later, while home on vacation from a job in Iraq, i met a mine foreman who offered me a job beginning the next Monday. Wife threatened to book out if i went to a coal mine, so i refused the job. On Monday the new miner was killed while working on the "dirty" side of the mining machine.
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2020
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  20. locutus

    locutus Well-Known Member Supporter

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    1st cousin was a personnel manager at a paper mill.

    OSHA azz-hole told them to remove all water coolers and replace with tap water because it wasn't "SAFE" to drink ice water when hot and sweaty.

    Letters to congressmen finally got the young azz-hole fired, but never could get OSHA to publicly admit they were wrong.
     
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