Cleaning up the brass off the range

Discussion in 'General Handgun Discussion' started by Vincine, Mar 20, 2012.

  1. Vincine

    Vincine New Member

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    I went to the outdoor range for the first time yesterday. I saw lots of handgun cartridges lying around on the ground. I’m thinking that most of it was left there last fall and is just now being revealed by the melt. There was an awful lot of .22 lying around as well as the other calibers. I wouldn’t think any of it was suitable for reloading, There’s got to be a lot of brass that could be scrapped & melted down seasonally. I know a magnetic sweeper will pick up the steel easily enough.

    So, what are the procedures or mechanisms for cleaning up the brass on an outdoor range? Is there a mechanical way to pick it all up? Would a lawn vacuum that’s run over the range before the grass is cut pick it up? Then you’ve got to sort it from the shells and other debris somehow.

    Any suggestions? Or is all back breaking time consuming pick it up by hand work?
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2012
  2. kaido

    kaido New Member

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    I've seen one way people have picked up their brass/hulls. It was apperantly supposed to be for picking up golf balls at driving ranges. But it's basically a big wheel with spokes coming off it that flex and let the hulls/brass get stuck between them and then dropped into a hopper.

    But if your range does do it all by hand, that would be a great way for younger kids to make some money. Could give them a couple cents per hull/case and then as they get cleaned up bring the cents per up a little so it stays even. I would gladly do that for a pay if I was younger. Haha
     

  3. BlueTurf

    BlueTurf New Member

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    I don't see any brass on the ground around here anymore because of the high price of scrap metal. There are a lot of brass scavengers who go to the popular shooting areas looking for spent cartridges. The only brass left behind is from .22 LRs., .22 mags and .17HMR.
     
  4. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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  5. Vincine

    Vincine New Member

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    Looks perfect! Thanks.
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2012
  6. levelcross

    levelcross New Member

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    When we shoot out behind the house I spread a 15'x15' tarp out. It takes about 2 shots and you know where to stand and catch all of your brass. A buddy at a Class III shop around the corner reloads a lot, so we give him what he wants and he gives us ammo in return, we both win this way.

    That pick up tool looks like it would work out OK on good ground, in the woods not so much.
     
  7. rsfrid

    rsfrid New Member

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  8. kaido

    kaido New Member

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    Just because my range is bad for them and it's out doors, how's it work on .22 cases?
     
  9. rigjumpr

    rigjumpr New Member

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    A lot of ranges don’t allow the policing of the brass. Once it hits the ground it’s the ranges Property
     
  10. BullseyePrecision

    BullseyePrecision New Member

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    I would be finding a different range.
     
  11. kaido

    kaido New Member

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    I'm with bullseye on that one. It seems a little selfish if you have to pay and the. Can't even take your own brass back. The range I use has a box so that if you don't want it, just pick it up and put it in the "donation" box. But this range is also just something set up on crown land so it doesn't really have any set hours either.
     
  12. rifleman1

    rifleman1 New Member

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    at the range i use there are people waiting to pick up the spent casings they always ask first,but one things for sure they are there everyday.
     
  13. Vincine

    Vincine New Member

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    The website says they make three versions; one for shells, one for centerfire, and one for .22s. I'm going to show the print out to 'HQ' and see what they think.
     
  14. Vincine

    Vincine New Member

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    I wasn't thinking of keeping and sorting the brass. I just want to help clean up the grounds.
     
  15. kaido

    kaido New Member

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    Ooh, I know I could use of for .22s. Me and my girlfriend always shoot close to a box or so when we go to the range. It gets a little stupid trynna pick them up one by one. Haha
     
  16. Vincine

    Vincine New Member

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    I thought of that. I'm going to see about stashing a tarp at the club someplace.
     
  17. rigjumpr

    rigjumpr New Member

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    don't get me wrong, if you catch the brass yeah keep it but to get it from the ground no, it's a safety thing

    [​IMG]
     
  18. HockaLouis

    HockaLouis New Member

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    DIfferent ranges, different rules.

    Here's one:
    People are always allowed, if not required, to pick up their own brass. If it is other people's they may not -- if it is on the ground it is the range's. The busiest range in the country a) had people pick up their brass and often had cleaning "parties" for shooters to police the brass. b) At shift ends (range ran two shifts, day and night) they used broom-handled squeegies to sweep the shells without raising dirt/dust. For ones in the dirt these were done by hand (.22 were usually left) and there were even metal rods with bent ends to insert into cases and pick up without bending over. Cases were "swept" into long handled dust bins and deposited in barrels...

    ...where the full time janitor, Chuck, would steal most of it and sell it to scrap yards and split the money with his accomplice boss, Mike.
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2012