Cleaning Tips - P229 / P238

Discussion in 'SIG Sauer Forum' started by Okie_6Shooter, Nov 4, 2013.

  1. Okie_6Shooter

    Okie_6Shooter New Member

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    I recently picked up these to particular guns. I am about to go take them out for a bit of target shooting. I was wondering if anyone had any tips for cleaning them? If anyone has anything that they have had to troubleshoot that might be helpful then I thank you in advance.
     

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  2. Garadex

    Garadex New Member

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    Only field strip it unless you know what you're doing and keep oil on the slide rails. But those are general semi auto pistol rules.
     

  3. activereality

    activereality New Member

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    I run my P229 (.40 S&W and conversions to .357 sig and the extra slide and mags for 9mm) with frog lube and have not any probs yet.

    Get used to the breakdown all you want. You'll have to do it anyway. It's also not like it is a super difficult or in depth take down. I would also clean the factory gunk off and run whatever lube you want(I hate the factory crap). But that is just me.

    I haven't had any FTF's at all for my P229 and have run around 4-5k rounds through it, mostly of hand loads. It loves 165 gr JHP's in .40 . It's the SAS E2 model(no rail).

    A co-worker has the P938 and it is smooth. (It's kind of like the 238, just in a 9mm instead if .380 hehe).

    Grats on the purchases. You'll love these two guns and they will bring a lot of joy :).
     
  4. Okie_6Shooter

    Okie_6Shooter New Member

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    Thanks. When it came to handguns I had only had a revolver. This was my first run with semi autos. Took them out and ran different ammo through them to see what they liked (or what I stayed steady shooting), took them home and gave them a good clean. It was a lot simpler than I had expected. Thanks for replying!
     
  5. Okie_6Shooter

    Okie_6Shooter New Member

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    That's pretty impressive. I got the rails and anywhere where it looked like there are moving parts. What about the hard to reach spots down around between the hammer and frame in there? I didn't want to gunk it up with lube and catch a bunch of dirt in there since it's hard to get to. I didn't want to rip things apart besides the basic disassembly until I really know what I'm doing.
     
  6. activereality

    activereality New Member

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    I'm a Marine, so my logic may be flawed(disclaimer hehe). If you are going to go with a wet lube, get it all wet. It will build up some debris, but that is normal. That just means you get to scrub it down more often=love lol. I used to run my guns(while active duty) to the point all internal components almost had a sheen of lube, then lightly wipe them down, assemble and go to town. Keeping a bit of extra lube on the BCG(Bolt Carrier Group).

    On pistols I did the same. Break it down. Scrub it with a nylon brush and whatever kind of lube you want until the brush almost looks clean again. Means the guns should be gtg. Make sure to scrub in those hard to reach places(just like mom used to yell at ya). There are very few surfaces that don't benefit from at least a little lube. Like areas that see no movement and such.

    Others may disagree. But I really don't think there is "too much lubrication". But you will get to the point when you fire the gun you are sprayed with lube, which isn't ideal but doesn't really hurt anything(eye-pro right lol) I'd count this under "diminishing returns for a lubricated gun". Hehe.

    I have been running Frog Lube in my pistols and rifles for almost a year I think, and it is great. It's a dry lube. So no wetness transfer under touching or rubbing(makes it great for EDC CC). The lube extrudes from the metal surfaces when it gets hot, like while firing. And then sinks back in afterwards. Also makes cleaning a breeze. Dry brush and some wipe down pads and gtg, carbon build up is very minimal.

    In the end though, to each their own. We all have our own rituals and such for cleaning, or even not cleaning and running something hard until it jams lol. The most important part of cleaning, in my opinion, is the inspection portion of the cleaning. When you break everything down to clean it, inspect the crap out of it. If something doesn't look right look it up in the manual, online, or anywhere else. Get familiar enough with your guns and the basic breakdown of them that you can catch these things. You will probably never to doors than remove the slide, "main springs"(different guns got different stuff), and the barrel. If it gets deeper than that, it's up to you and what you are comfortable with(resources are everywhere though).

    Above all else enjoy. Keep em running hard. Guns are made to shoot. So closet queens are nice. But bad *** training b!7h3$ need be to run hard, hot, and put through the ringer lol. None of the guns I own "sits" idle. I run them. Some have some scratches from training(i do not condone purposely scratching a gun to make it look used lol). But mine are definitely not "range queens". :: the previous was a personal opinion haha.
     
  7. activereality

    activereality New Member

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    Edited: fixed a slipped expletive(sorry mods my bad) and corrected a few "auto-corrected" words.
     
  8. Okie_6Shooter

    Okie_6Shooter New Member

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    So you're saying I shouldn't scratch it up and beat it up to make it look like it's really been used??? Dang! Good advice though and you're right. I'm out in the country so going target shooting is more of a viable option than going shopping (unless for more ammo) so I'm sure they will get plenty of use!
     
  9. activereality

    activereality New Member

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    Woot. Sounds like a good time. I've thought about getting a stiffer spring for the .357 Sig barrel. It's a bit snappy. The .40 S&W and 9mm aren't bad at all. I've done almost 800 rounds of .40 in a day before. Lots of fun.
     
  10. RUT

    RUT New Member Supporter

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    >>I'm a Marine, so my logic may be flawed<<

    Hey, don't let the ghost of Chesty Puller hear you say that Marine!
     
  11. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    I use a little grease on the barrel hood and rails of my 220 in addition to the light wipedown of oil on teh rest of the gun. I like to have some grease on aluminum rails where a steel slide runs.
     
  12. activereality

    activereality New Member

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    Haha. Yeah. I've just gotten used to a lot of "people with opinions" saying that I dot make sense to them. So I list it under being a Marine and this having a greater understanding of how to take in information and use it to my advantage. To the outward public it is just easier to play the "informal teacher". I've gotten so used to it, that it is second nature. Lol. J/K everybody ;)! Fun times right?
     
  13. Okie_6Shooter

    Okie_6Shooter New Member

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    Well since we have some "informal teachers" and Marines in here, I have another question. In my original post you can see a pic of the two pistols. The P229 has a Viridian C5 on it. What's y'all's thoughts on laser/lights like that? It already has night sights and is making finding a holster more difficult, but do you think the positives that it could bring to the table in a self defense situation would warrant even having it on the firearm? Thanks!
     
  14. activereality

    activereality New Member

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    My personal opinion is it isn't needed. Others feel very comfortable with them and use them.

    I realize that it can in some cases increase "time on target", but I also do not wish to flag or reveal my position prematurely.

    I have the sig night sites on my P229 And love them. My SAS E2 doesn't have a rail, and even if it did I probably wouldn't run a light( I have before on other guns and enjoyed it though). I carry a small pocket flashlight(sure fire) with me at all times so have ample lighting available.

    I think lasers are useful but I wouldn't come to depend on it. In a scuffle, if he laser was damaged, you would not want your ability to correctly aim be hindered because the laser was no longer operational, or maybe even aimed incorrectly after the damage. Just possibility I know. But I try to depend on as little things going my way as possible and still be able to succeed. Read that as I try to minimize my possible points of failure. That isn't to say they may not have merit.

    It may also come down, for some, to I like denim jeans over corduroy pants. Opinions differ. Hehe.

    There are many view points and pretty much all of them have good standing and make sense. You may try finding a range that will let ya rent a gun with a laser and try it out, or maybe a buddy.

    That will at least give an idea of operation, usage, distance of use, reaction time upon activation, if you like the color, whatever lol.
     
  15. Okie_6Shooter

    Okie_6Shooter New Member

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    That's a lot of great info and definitely the mindset of someone that has more than just a bit of plinking experience! When I shoot that range, I do not practice with it besides maybe just a couple shots to make sure I'm holding true to the front dot. I figure I need to learn the firearm completely first and get a good feel for the pistol itself before even particularly worrying about the laser. I am gonna keep it on there because the light itself will help if I'm out near where some hogs could be running around at night. I agree also that in a home defense type of setting that it would not be advantageous to go turning the laser on and blowing your cover and advantage of knowing the premise. I hope it never has to be used that way though. After one has given up his position then do you feel it is more practical?
     
  16. activereality

    activereality New Member

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    That is pretty much my view point - know your tools and be able to use them in any manner possible.

    On the use of railed objects once your position is known: act. At that point it wouldn't matter if you threw a brick. Act. Take action against the intruder(enemy) before they take action on you. A 1/2 second pause may be all it takes for the intruder's OODA Loop to catch up and for him to take action. Once you have been put into a defensive position(as horrible as it may sound), that person has nullified their own right to live. They have threatened the life of me and mine, therefore I choose me and mine to survive. And I would like to think I would do anything to ensure the best outcome for those I love and care for.

    Hesitation can kill. However, This must be tempered with situational awareness, like who else is in the house you know of and where might they be( much easier for couples with no children)?

    The truth is, I value my life above those that would do me harm. The act of breaking into my home at night shows the intent to dispatch whoever is in that home without regard for life. If they did not want a confrontation, they would pick a home with no vehicles in front if it during the day, when most are at work(not all though) and not in their homes.