Firearms Talk banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys!! Got another noob question for yas. I've watched instructional videos on you tube for cleaning the GP100 without having to take it apart (don't feel comfortable) and for some reason I cant get rid of those carbon circles around each chamber of the cylinder facing the barrel. I've tried Hoppes # 9 solvent with a bronze brush and also tried one of those CLP all in one solutions. I did let it sit for a little while before trying to clean it but no luck. One thing i should mention, I didn't clean the gun as soon as I got home from the range, don't know if that's important. I'm really hoping it's not permanent. You experts out there have any tips for me? :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,030 Posts
If the gun is stainless just get some Flitz and apply with a soft brush, it will get rid of all that carbon in a jiffy on the cylinder face and frame and forcing cone. Wipe it clean with a soft cloth.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,474 Posts
Another way to deal with it is to just forget about it. It doesn't hurt anything and isn't worth spending money on. Just another option. They will come back next time you shoot the gun.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,415 Posts
I’m with Southernguns on this one. I don’t care as long as the gun is clean those carbon stains don’t bother me in the least. With my stainless Super Blackhawk in 454 Casull it only takes one round to make that ring. The only thing I care about is cleaning the cylinder throats forcing cone and barrel. The outside of the gun gets wiped and what doesn’t come off stays on.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,030 Posts
I agree, it is not that big a deal, but if it is stainless Flitz makes it no big deal to clean it off too. A minute with a tiny amount on a soft toothbrush and it’s gone. Your preference obviously. I never thought it was a big deal to clean…
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,362 Posts
Trust me fellas. Those Brillo pads are dynamite on dirty stainless steel revolvers.
Won't dull the finish with scratches?? I'm referring to nickel or Stainless? I could see it removing blued finishes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,386 Posts
Won't dull the finish with scratches?? I'm referring to nickel or Stainless? I could see it removing blued finishes.
Not that I noticed.
On the front of the cylinder where the carbon rings tend to form u have a dull finish anyhow I think.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
On Stainless steel , Birchwood Casey Lead away cloth . Cut a piece off the cloth , the burn marks wipe off like magic . I use it every time , my cylinder face I as shiny like brand new . You can try #9 with a brush all day and it won't work as good , the cloth wiped it off without scratching the cylinder face , trust me , nothing works better then the cloth. Buy on line, Birchwood Casey Lead Away Cloth.
Chris
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Yea it’s got a stainless steel finish. I know it’s personal preference, but I was concerned maybe it could cause a little erosion if u let the crap sit there for a long time. And I know it just gets dirty again every range trip , but, I think that it looks so damn purty when that stainless is clean :)

Thanks for all the replies guys!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
Mozz
Get the Birchwood Casey Lead Away Cloth. Your cylinder face will shine like a mirror , it will remove all fouling anywhere on your revolver . I use it on my S&W model 65 it's a 3" heavy barrel 357 Stainless Steel revolver , I've had it for many years and it's in excellent condition , looks better then new . Get the cloth , believe me , you won't be disappointed. Give it a try and let me know how you like it , you can thank me later.
Chris
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
Mozz
I'm glad , and you will be too. Just rub a piece of the cloth back and forth on the cylinder face and it will remove any burn marks and polish the face like a mirror.
Chris
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Chris,

Well, I think the pictures speak for themselves. Thanks again for the referral. I totally get what everyone else was saying about just leaving it. Just gonna happen all over again every range trip and would end up being another expense. I’ll play it by ear. As I stated earlier I was more concerned about possibly damaging the finish if i let it stay. I read a lot of the comments on Amazon and saw that this was a common issue. So for any fellow noobs reading this post , I highly recommend!!

244234
DBAC37F5-8DCB-469B-91BC-1DCBAE4CADB6.jpeg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
Mozz
The area between the forcing cone ( end of barrel ) and cylinder face is critical , should be as clean as possible . I'm a benchrest shooter , my rifle is clean as new after every firing . Keeps your firearm in perfect working order . Some shooters feel you shouldn't clean until your groups start to open up , never made sense to me.
Everyone has to do what feels right by them. Your cylinder face should be as clean as your barrel. Be Safe and enjoy shooting your new revolver. Ballistol is a good all-around cleaner & lube. Be Well.
Chris
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top