Chambering a Round

Discussion in 'Concealed Carrying & Personal Protection' started by Polygon, Nov 10, 2012.

  1. Polygon

    Polygon New Member

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    I've heard from many sources that you can only chamber a round so many times before I becomes unsafe to fire. This is one of the reasons you should cycle your defense loads. Now, the odd thing is that I've they never say how many time you can chamber a round before it would be considered unsafe to fire.

    Does anyone know this? I don't unload my EDC except when going to the range to train/practice or if I'm cleaning the gun. So, how many time can I chamber a round before I should cycle it out?
     
  2. AsSeenOnTV

    AsSeenOnTV New Member

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    Last edited: Nov 19, 2012

  3. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    I have heard that chambering 45acp shouldn't happen more than a couple of times due to the bullet getting set back into the brass and compressing the powder charge or something.
     
  4. racer_x

    racer_x New Member

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    I did it during hunting season last year with my 1911 45acp same round in an out everytime i went out it was about 1/8" shorter then a good one,
     
  5. canebrake

    canebrake New Member

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  6. AsSeenOnTV

    AsSeenOnTV New Member

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    Last edited: Nov 19, 2012
  7. Polygon

    Polygon New Member

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    Wow! That's some eye opening crap! :eek:

    My EDC is 9mm. It looks like I'll be investing in a micro meter.
     
  8. Blueguns

    Blueguns New Member

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    Does this only apply to center fire handgun rounds? What about finger oils leaking into primer of a shotgun shell?
     
  9. AsSeenOnTV

    AsSeenOnTV New Member

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    Last edited: Nov 19, 2012
  10. KG7IL

    KG7IL Active Member

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    I am carring a mix of brands these days, but I have always liked the Sellier and Bellot 230gr .45 ACP for their sealed primers and bullet.
    I should run a few tests with these. I would like to know if the bullet set back breaks the seal or if the seal helps hold the bullet.

    hmmmmm .. .. .. something to try.

    Since I carry regularly and shoot often on my property, I end up with a mix of brand in some of my mags. I may not even know which round has been chambered one, twice, never or forever. I do try to keep one mag of PD ammo, but indeed, I chamber, unload and rechamber the first two rounds fairly often.
     
  11. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't say that there is a set time or number of chamberings that a round can take. Inspect rounds for signs of obvious wear or nicks on case rims, and check bullets for set-back. Other than if you start to have doubts about the reliability of the ammo then get a new box and fire off your old rounds.

    I don't know about the finger oils theory. Other solvents and gun oils maybe.

    Even exposure to water is not necessarily the end of ammo. I recently forgot to remove a mag from a jacket pocket before my wife did laundry. I no longer wanted to bet my life on those rounds working, so I took them to the range and every one of them fed, fired, and ejected. They even grouped well.

    So, there is no magic number or ammount of time that renders them unreliable. But if you have doubts, it's time for a fresh box.
     
  12. Coyotenator

    Coyotenator New Member

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    Every time a bullet hits the feed ramp during chambering it might be driven back into the case a few thousandths.This is cumulative and again might create a high pressure issue after an undetermined number of chamberings.
    I check OAL on any ammo that I think has been chambered more than a few times(this only occurs with my EDC ammo) ,and have found several that were 8 or 10 thousandths short, so I set them aside for practice ammo.
     
  13. REDTAIL

    REDTAIL Member

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    I think caring a Revolver,? Would stop all of this worry.?
     
  14. KG7IL

    KG7IL Active Member

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    Oh there we go. someone trying to take the easy way out. ;)
     
  15. Blueguns

    Blueguns New Member

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    I understand that is not (as far as we know) a fact. I was just curious as to extent of the theory, because it wasn't something I'd heard before.

    I don't usually keep my hd rounds all that long. After a certain amount of time they tend to see some aggressors in the form of water jugs. :D
     
  16. AsSeenOnTV

    AsSeenOnTV New Member

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    Last edited: Nov 19, 2012
  17. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Unless you are a star of Jersey Shore, you probably do not have sufficient oil on your hand to EVER affect a primer. Modern primers are damn stable and very resistant to moisture and oils (even WD 40). I have seen plety of rounds go through a full wash and dry cycle in the pocket of a pair of jeans and STILL go bang w/o any drama.
     
  18. orangello

    orangello New Member

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    roflol!!!!!!
     
  19. Steel_Talon

    Steel_Talon New Member

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    "SET BACK" increases cartridge ignition pressure which is a bad thing. To eliviate this pressure, you just need to rotate your rounds in the magazines.
    ST~
     
  20. 7point62

    7point62 Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I've made it a habit to cycle my loads even in my revolvers every few weeks. Never had a solid reason for it, just figured it was a good idea.

    I also think it's a good idea when loading to give each round a good look-over before you put it in the mag or cylinder. Rarely, if ever, will you find a factory flaw but it has been known to happen.