Cerakote vs Duracoat for Rem 870 Tact.

Discussion in 'Engraving & Refinishing' started by Trip83, Oct 3, 2012.

  1. Trip83

    Trip83 New Member

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    I have been reading up on coatings for firearms. I know that many neat things can be down with coating now a days. My big question is, What is the big difference between Cerakote and Duracoat??? And, which should I use and why? It seems like whatever I read, one site will say Pro Cerakote and Anti Duracoat and then vise versa. I have a Rem 870 that I use for work (law enforcement). I have had it out in all kinds of weather. Rain, Snow, Heat... I have had it against a tree for support and it has bumped into a wall from time to time in narrow houses. I want something that will last in all weathers and wont scratch... Any suggestions and advise?!?!? Thanks!!
     
  2. texaswoodworker

    texaswoodworker New Member

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    I'm not an expert on finishing, but I think Duracoat is the best choice of the two. From what I have heard, it is extremely tough and will handle just about anything.
     

  3. gladesbassin

    gladesbassin New Member

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    I believe duracoat has to sit for like 2 weeks for the coat to cure, cerakote bakes and is done once baking is done. I've seen a torture test of both side by side and both stood up pretty well. Just depends on the price your getting it for and whether your willing to wait 2 weeks. I'm not 100% sure about this info but good luck finding the info you need.
     
  4. DuraCoater

    DuraCoater New Member

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    Actually DuraCoat will continue to cure as time passes.

    Generally it is dry to the touch in under an hour, should be left alone for 48 hours before reassembly and light use. Two weeks is a good time stamp where you can ramp up more rigid activities with it.

    I have nothing against other types of finishes, I simply began using, honing, and prefer DuraCoat (incase my username did not give it away).

    Be very wary however of the DuraCoat "urban legends" you will surely encounter that are used to make it appear inferior to other products. I'm sure you have witnessed at least one "1911 or Glock?" thread - well it is pretty much the same thing.
     
  5. gladesbassin

    gladesbassin New Member

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    Sweet, I wasn't far off for not really knowing much about it. You got pictures of your work? Or a website I can check out?
     
  6. gladesbassin

    gladesbassin New Member

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    Good looking work, where are you located?
     
  7. DuraCoater

    DuraCoater New Member

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    I am in the Augusta Georgia area. :)
     
  8. Trip83

    Trip83 New Member

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    Thanks for the response folks! DuraCoater, What kind of price am I looking at for a remington 870? Just looking for a basic Black. Dont need anything fancy.
     
  9. DuraCoater

    DuraCoater New Member

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    I just do it as a hobby for now, but retail for one long gun ranges from $150.00 to $250.00, maybe a little cheaper if you look hard enough.
     
  10. ccr

    ccr New Member

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    Trip83
    Duracoat and Cerakote are both good DIY coatings. Duracoat is a two part Epoxy paint.

    THe key to any good refinishing is in the prep work done to the metal . First off the current finish needs to be completely removed and then you can remove any dings or blems in the metal. Being that you said you take this Rem 870 into harsh weather conditions I would suggest that the 870 be parkerized before applying any coating. Parkerize will give you a additional layer of rust and corrosion protection. Then you can apply the Duracoat

    If you have any questions please feel free to ask
     
  11. TheOldMan

    TheOldMan New Member

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    Since retiring from my regular job I've taken up restoration as a full time side business... Barring any "major" clean up work, I can restore your 870 for $100.. You pay shipping both ways. Price includes minor wood restoration, blasting old finish, and DuraCoat application.. Surface rust removal and minor pit removal is what I consider "minor" work and is included in the $100 price.

    PM if interested..
     
  12. DuraCoater

    DuraCoater New Member

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    One thing I want to expand on. Sometimes removing the old type of finish actually harms adhesion than promotes it.

    DuraCoat especially loves it some parkerized or anodized surfaces because they are rough and offer lots of bite. In a professional setup most people who apply DuraCoat will actually have parkerizing as part of the process.

    Its not absolutely required, but it makes adhesion less likely to fail on a "oops" moment with bare metal that has been prepped.

    Now lets say you have an old coat of DuraCoat you want to respray (or even change color) - as long as the old coating is not very thick, it is ideal to simply "scotch pad" the old DuraCoat for the new Duracoat, instead of completely stripped it.

    With that said, knowing what is acceptable to recover without stripping comes with experience. So when in doubt, strip it - it is your fail safe.

    Also, a lot of the complaints on DuraCoat are with thickness. Some people have no learned to be slow and patient with multiple passes, building up millimeter by millimeter.

    You see these guys make 2 passes and coat the entire item. There are always exceptions to the rule, but this generally means it is being laid on too thick. For some areas this is no big deal, for others it just causes a headache with tolerances until it "wears" down a bit.
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2012
  13. TheOldMan

    TheOldMan New Member

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    With all due respect, I've been doing this for about 13 years... I don't know everything but I do know about providing a good surface for the DuraCoat. Most of the work I do is restoration of MilSurps.. I try (and so far have been very successful at) restoring to the original finishes.. The Remington shotguns have very forgiving tollerences.. anything you apply to the outside will not effect performance.. My offer stands =)
     
  14. DuraCoater

    DuraCoater New Member

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    Good surface is subjective term.

    Do I strip entirely before refinishing? Absolutely.

    Do I do it every single time? Not at all. Majority of the time, but not all.

    I'm not saying a clean/prepped area is not needed, I am simplying saying that cleaning the existing surface finish may be more beneficial then stripping down to bare metal.

    Key phrase is "may be".

    If something has a parkerized finish and I can clean that top layer of parkerization to acceptable standards - that parkerized surface provides exellent bite, then say - bare metal that is media blasted in -> some cases <-.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2012
  15. TheOldMan

    TheOldMan New Member

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    Another shop in my area park's before applying DuraCoat.. I do believe in his practise but don't think it's needed at all times (hence the lower resto prices).. Depending on the OP's shotgun, if it's an Express model, it won't need the park (IMA).. If it's the Wingmaster, then blasting with oxide should provide the surface needed for DuraCoat... But for me and my business, prep is everything... most of the cost in resto work is in the prep.. The materials for doing the work is very minimal.. A lot of times, customers can reduce cost buy tearing down the weapons themselves. The less I have to do, the less I charge the client...
     
  16. DuraCoater

    DuraCoater New Member

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    Agreed 100%

    Man hours are what make a restoration project succeed. The materials are but a fraction of the total bill.