Cerakote...need help!

Discussion in 'Engraving & Refinishing' started by Broke124, Feb 5, 2012.

  1. Broke124

    Broke124 New Member

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    HEY guys I wanna cerakote some of my pistols (mainly my Glock frames) but have no clue as to how the process goes. Any insight on this stuff? Do I have to bake it in the oven? And BTW I want the best finish available so if its sub par to cerakote, don't mention it. From what I hear cerakote is the best aftermarket finish available. So I need to know if I need any special tools or anything like that, how it cures, etc. All help is appreciated.

    "...rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm." /G\
     
  2. rigjumpr

    rigjumpr New Member

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  3. JohnJak

    JohnJak New Member

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    I thought Glock frames were plastic?
     
  4. Broke124

    Broke124 New Member

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    They are. What's that got to do with anything?

    "...rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm." /G\
     
  5. HOSSFLY

    HOSSFLY New Member

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    Well I sure wouldn't bake it in the oven :rolleyes:
     
  6. rigjumpr

    rigjumpr New Member

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    Last edited: Feb 5, 2012
  7. Broke124

    Broke124 New Member

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    Well I mean, I wasn't gonna put it on jiffy corn muffin mix temps. Lol. I have a toaster oven that will go to temps from 100 degrees to 600 degrees.

    "...rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm." /G\
     
  8. trip286

    trip286 New Member

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    Will cerakote even adhere to plastic?
    And why do you want to coat it? Is it to change the color? If so, I think there may be a better coating out there for changing the color on a polymer framed handgun, but heck if I know what that may be...

    I am not an expert, but I don't think I'd cerakote a polymer frame, because, even though those are tough as hell, cerakote is basically a spray on ceramic coating, and I would think that even a tough GLOCK polymer frame will have some minor flex upon firing that could lead to the cerakote chipping and flaking off.

    Maybe someone who knows much more than we do will step in and help you out.
     
  9. rigjumpr

    rigjumpr New Member

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    30 min. @ 250 deg is all..
     
  10. Wiseman3

    Wiseman3 New Member

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    Non metal parts at 150-180 degrees for 2 hours for cure time
     
  11. Broke124

    Broke124 New Member

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    I'm just really interested in altering color. May end up doing some metal coating on my Sig frames as well. Any other suggestions?

    "...rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm." /G\
     
  12. levelcross

    levelcross New Member

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    I've been looking at this for my daughters gun, kinda a girly girl thing for her. I would like to know how well it holds up on a M&P of a 1911.
     
  13. jarhead315

    jarhead315 New Member

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    I saw a video on Duracoat and it was incredible to say the least. Watch it on You Tube and then make up your mind. I really think you will go with the Diracoat when you see what colors it has and the look it gives to the firearms. Check it out first and I know you will definitely change your mind. Good luck!
     
  14. Bear304inc

    Bear304inc New Member

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    Duracoat, way better, more colors check out the electric colors.
     
  15. g17frantz

    g17frantz New Member

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    I have duracoated several polymer frame pistols. Its extremely easy. Cerakote is a tougher finish but duracoat is damn strong. The last two I did were a Glock 17 and an H&K USP 9mm both in flat dark earth. Don't have pics b/c I did them at my shop. Sandblast at about 30-35 Psi after the frame is stripped down-takes about 5 min w/a Glock-not so much with the H&K. It doesn't take a lot, just lightly roughens up the surface to accept the paint easier, then wipe down with acetone several times. Get an airbrush gun and paint! I usually make a couple to three passes. Its all about the preparation, the better you do preparing, the cleaner it will look. I've had a couple of bad ones due to bad preparation. It needs about 3 weeks to fully air cure so don't rush it....beauty takes time. And btw, duracoat offers soooooo many more colors than cerakote. Hope this helps, this is just the way we do it.
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2012
  16. floydrharper

    floydrharper New Member

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    Glock Frame Cerakote

    Cerakote is a super hard ceramic coating that resists wear and tear well. A lot of flex probably wouldn't be great as ceramics are notoriously brittle. However, I don't think there's enough flex in a Glock frame to be a problem. Cerakote operates through a network of "applicators" who can be located through a map on the Cerakote website. These are gunsmiths local to you who are competent to perform the process. Cerakote comes in 2 flavors, air dry and heat dry. As for the slide or barrel, I'd probably opt for Titanium Nitride or similar coating as those components take quite a beating.
     
  17. Byron0022

    Byron0022 New Member

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    I'm not trying to be funny but why would you Cerakote a polymer frame?
     
  18. floydrharper

    floydrharper New Member

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    Only reason I can think of is to change the color. A lot of folks want to customize their toys to make them their own. I've known people to just grab a can of Krylon and do the job, but I think one has to be a Philistine to use a $2.99 can of paint on a $500 pistol. As for Cerakoting, I'd have a pro do the job unless one is very handy, which I'm not.
     
  19. TheOldMan

    TheOldMan New Member

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    My two cents worth... One thing to remeber is that Cerekote will add thickness to whatever you apply it to so frame rails and stuff like that may have to be sanded slightly for them to fit and function properly.. I exclusevely use Dura-Coat because it goes on much thinner and does not alter fit and function in the least bit. Dura-Coat is an extremely durable finish that will withstand years of wear and tear. As mentioned before, Dura-Coat comes in a ton of colors and can be applied to anything from metal to wood and does not require baking.
     
  20. floydrharper

    floydrharper New Member

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    I'd agree, except that Glocks are (intentionally?) made pretty loose. I think it would take a pretty thick coat of anything to obstruct them. I'm having my slide done in Titanium Nitride (which is gold and has a Rockwell number of >65).