Centerfire .22 Smith

Discussion in 'Revolver Handguns' started by Tyrsgodi, Oct 14, 2020.

  1. Tyrsgodi

    Tyrsgodi Active Member

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    I just saw this old ad on another board, and have never heard of this. Is this the .22 Jet I have seen in mythology? [​IMG]
     
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  2. Nod

    Nod Well-Known Member

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    This is what I found on the Jet, the fps certainly doesn't match the ad.


    [​IMG]
    .22 Remington Jet (center) with .22 Hornet (left) and .223 Rem (right).
    Type Revolver and rifle
    Place of origin US
    Production history
    Produced
    1961
    Specifications
    Bullet diameter
    .222 in (5.6 mm)
    Neck diameter .247 in (6.3 mm)
    Shoulder diameter .350 in (8.9 mm)
    Base diameter .376 in (9.6 mm)
    Rim diameter .440 in (11.2 mm)
    Case length 1.28 in (33 mm)
    Overall length 1.58 in (40 mm)
    Rifling twist 1:10
    Primer type Small Pistol (Boxer)
    [​IMG]
    Boxer primer type pocket"
    Ballistic performance


    Bullet mass/type Velocity Energy
    40 gr (3 g) 1,710 ft/s (520 m/s) 261 ft⋅lbf (354 J)
    40 gr (3 g) 1,700 ft/s (520 m/s) 258 ft⋅lbf (350 J)
    45 gr (3 g) 1,630 ft/s (500 m/s) 267 ft⋅lbf (362 J)
    Test barrel length: 8½ in (22 cm)
    Source(s): Barnes & Amber 1972
    The .22 Remington Jet (also known as .22 Jet, .22 Center Fire Magnum, or .22 CFM)[1] is a .22 in (5.6mm) American centerfire revolver and
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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    Developed jointly by Remington and Smith & Wesson, it was to be used in the Model 53 revolver, which first appeared late in 1961.[1] While it traced its origins to potent wildcats such as the .224 Harvey Kay-Chuk,[2] which ultimately derive from the .22 Hornet,[2] it was a bottlenecked cartridge based upon the .357 Magnum case necked down to a .22 caliber bullet, with an unusually long tapered shoulder.

    By 1972, the Model 53 remained the only revolver chambered for it,[1] while Marlin in 1972 was planning a lever rifle in .22 Jet.[1]

    The .22 Jet was also a factory chambering for the T/C Contender and the design allowed for it to reach its full potential. No cylinder gap, no case setback.[3][circular reference]

    The .22 Jet was designed as a flat-shooting hunting round for handguns, and it is suitable for handgun hunting of varmints and medium game out to 100 yd (90 m).[1] The 2460 ft/s (750 m/s) and 535 ft-lbf (725 J) claimed for factory test loads did not prove out in service weapons.[1]
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2020
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  3. oO_Rogue_Oo

    oO_Rogue_Oo Well-Known Member

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    22 Jet is a fun little round but has some issues. I rarely shoot mine anymore. I reload for mine sizing 357 mag brass. The biggest problem is stuck cases. The design of the round causes cases to stick in the cylinder. I use a ejection rod to drive them out but it takes some of the fun out of shooting it. It is fun to reload for though.

    Makes a great collector piece but I can't recommend it for shooting.
     
  4. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member Admin Moderator Lifetime Supporter

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    IIRC, you had a choice- a lightly lubed chamber that, upon firing, made brass slide back and lock up the gun, or bone dry chambers that held fired brass in a deathgrip. But yeah, the other name for .22 CF Magnum was .22 Jet.
     
  5. DHall_37

    DHall_37 Member

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    Would .22 CF Magnum be the same a .22 WCF?
     
  6. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member Admin Moderator Lifetime Supporter

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    Nope. The .22 Jet was a REMINGTON cartridge. The .22 WCF was a rifle round from long, long ago- in a galaxy far, far away...

    [​IMG]
     
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  7. DHall_37

    DHall_37 Member

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    Nice, I learn something new every day!
     
  8. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member Admin Moderator Lifetime Supporter

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    I am a NOVICE cartridge collector- only have a couple of thousand different rounds. There is more oddball, obsolete, weird strange and unusual stuff out there than you would believe. Things like .35 S&W auto. .307 Winchester. 32 gauge shotshells (not .32 caliber) Crispins, cupfires, lipfires, teatfires. .33 Winchester Centerfire, and riot control loads for the Tommy Gun (.45 ACP birdshot)
     
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  9. alsaqr

    alsaqr Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Added:

    In the 1920s Col. Townsend Whelen and his crew chambered a model 1922 rifle (.22 rimfire version of the 1903 Springfield) to .22 WCF and began some serious experiments. Result: The .22 Hornet was born and Winchester began manufacturing the ammunition in 1930.
     
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  10. oO_Rogue_Oo

    oO_Rogue_Oo Well-Known Member

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    Ohhhhhhhhhh so you have one too, or had one anyway. Couldn't have described it better myself. :)