CC Glock?

Discussion in 'Concealed Carrying & Personal Protection' started by PSYCHOFREAK3, Mar 28, 2012.

  1. PSYCHOFREAK3

    PSYCHOFREAK3 New Member

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    Kind of an akward question, my Utah permit came in recently and I plan on a short trip to WI to test it out. My issue is I was planning on carrying my Glock 19 as I am more than proficient with it and it's a little smaller than a 5"1911. My problem is I will not be carrying with one in the chamber until I get used to the idea of being in public with a firearm, but when I get to that point holstering/re-holstering is my issue.

    I am a big guy 6'3" about 240lbs so when I carry in a Galco king tuk at the 4 to 4:30 position I can't visually see when I reholster. my problem is if I can't see to holster and a round is chambered how do I make sure a foreign object is not in the trigger guard while I am holstering which would depress the trigger causing a ND? The only thing I have come up with is during the holstering process sticking my finger between the rear of the trigger and the trigger guard and that way if I felt any pressure on the trigger I would stop holstering.

    Am I reading too much into this? I am a little nervous coming from IL I have only been able to carry around my house which I haven't done with a round in the chamber yet. So how do you guys do it that have a similar situation?
     
  2. TimKS

    TimKS Active Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Not to put you down, but why are you taking the gun out and putting it back? Put it in the holster and leave it alone until needed is my suggestion. When re-holstering, the trigger guard should protect the trigger from being pulled / pushed if you're just mindful of what you are doing. Good luck in WI.
     

  3. mudpupp

    mudpupp New Member

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    Way too much reading dude!!

    I am not too familiar with your $40 holster, but you need one that stays open with no obstructions like a crossbreed supertuck.

    Then you NEED to PRACTICE, practice, practice.
    With an UNLOADED weapon until you are extremely comfortable.

    An ND only occurs when people are negligent !!

    Training, practice, and proper equipment are more important than anything else in the process.

    Good luck
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2012
  4. Unashamedlaborer

    Unashamedlaborer New Member

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    I agree with everything you said. Except the Galco King Tuk is the same thing as a crossbreed supertuck except it's better made. I have both.
    You want a crossbreed horsehide glock holster? I'd love to sell mine.
     
  5. mudpupp

    mudpupp New Member

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    Only if you include a glock. I don't own any foreign made guns..
     
  6. Unashamedlaborer

    Unashamedlaborer New Member

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    Sorry no can do.
    I admire your patriotism and as soon as an American company can compete head to head with a glock or xd I will own one and carry it daily.
     
  7. mudpupp

    mudpupp New Member

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    That's why I carry an M&P all day every day
     
  8. Vincine

    Vincine New Member

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    Glock leg anyone?

    I’m working on getting a holster for my G19 now. I wouldn’t make it a practice to put ANYTHING inside the trigger guard area EVER, except my finger and ONLY when I want to fire. There's way too much of an opportunity for a mistake and a ND in general, and especially with Glocks, when holstering. I'm covering the guard with my finger as it slides into the holster. So far just a Glock Sport holster and a VersaCarry. (And yes, the pistol is empty.)

    You're setting yourself up for 'Glock leg'. Below from http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Glock leg

    A condition where a person shoots himself (or herself) in the leg while holstering their Glock pistol. This can happen with any weapon yielded by a careless user, but it is common among Glock pistols due to the lack of a manual safety, relatively light trigger pull, and lack of a proper hammer to push on while holstering. "How is Jim doing? I heard that he came down with a case of Glock leg at the range yesterday."
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2012
  9. wjnfirearms

    wjnfirearms New Member

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    +1 on keeping your finger off of the trigger. That's a bad habit to get into or to keep doing, but it's way more common than one would believe. You're just asking for an unintentional discharge if there's one in the pipe. The way that conventional training is being done is to position your index finger along the frame of the gun straight out just above the trigger. Your finger goes to the trigger when you get into the action position and have the weapon pointed downrange toward your target and am ready to fire. That's the way I teach as well. It's by far the safest way to unholster a weapon while not delaying your ability to deliver rounds downrange toward your intended target. You should also holster it in just the same way.

    People who insist on fingering the trigger before you get into a shooting position tempt fate way too often. In a real scenario, your adrenalin is pumping, your nerves are on edge, and it's way too risky to have your finger press on the trigger before you intend to be in a position to shoot, if at all. Add having one in the pipe, a trigger safety or none at all, and possibly a weapon with lighter trigger pull, and you compound the issue immensely. Once a bullet is sent downrange, you cannot whistle it back. All you can hope for that if it wasn't sent in an intended direction or at all that it goes somewhere benign. Even if it is, it's risky in other areas than personal safety. That's more of a gamble than anyone should be willing to risk if possible, which should be more often than not.

    As to the holster itself, there should be no obstructions hosltering the gun. If your body is creating the obstruction, maybe your choice of position on your belt needs to be re-evaluated. The 4:00 position is by far one of the most comfortable while sitting (not always depending on the gun and body structure) and delivers less print, but may not be ideal for everyone. The cheaper inside waistband holsters do collapse and so are more difficult to hoslter without using two hands. For a molded leather or Kydex one, if there is an obstruction and you cannot visualize it during the process, get another holster or position it where you can see what is going on. And practice, practice, practice.
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2012
  10. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    I may catch flak for this but, I don't carry with one in the chamber ever.
    It's just safer that way. Chances are that extra half a second it takes to rack it isn't going to be an issue if you are being aware of your environment. Maybe that half second will even give you enough time to assess the situation and save you the trouble of shooting some guy with a candy bar.
     
  11. PSYCHOFREAK3

    PSYCHOFREAK3 New Member

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    I apologize I may not have been clear enough in my initial post. After more thinking about it I don't believe it would be an issue. As far as putting the pistol there and leaving it there that's the goal to never have to draw. My issue was holstering initially, if you can't physicially see the firearm as it's entering the holster how do you verify that "something" wouldn't be in the way. I understand all of the safety rules of handling a firearm, just chalking this up to being nervous about the first time carrying in public.

    Regardless thank you all for the replys.
     
  12. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    No need to apologize. You may want to reconsider how you carry though. And as far as being nervous at first, that may be kind of a good thing. Just make sure you don't keep doing a gun check and give away the fact you are carrying. Big noob mistake.
     
  13. Glockpotion23

    Glockpotion23 New Member

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    Hey try the M&P series by Smith&Wesson. I hear they are in the same class as Glocks and XD(M)'s. Its on my wishlist:)
     
  14. Unashamedlaborer

    Unashamedlaborer New Member

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    Well on the californian market the m&p has a magazine disconnect, as well as the compact model weighing as much as my full size glock. To me it is in the same class. Heck I own one. But I choose to carry the glock 27. Smaller, lighter, no mag disconnect, readily available parts and accesories, and the same firepower.
    The m&p is a fine weapon though. It's prone to more failures with reloads in my Experience as I have all three. Other than that for a range gun I'd rather shoot it that any of the others. Great gun just not the best for carry.
     
  15. PigPilot

    PigPilot New Member

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    When I went to cop school ages ago, we were taught to reholster without looking at the holster i.e. always watching for additional threats. Practice with an empty firearm until it's second nature. As far as an empty chamber, you're shortchanging yourself precious microseconds, IMHO. One of our detectives was trained in the USMC [SEMPER FI to all you Marines out there! ! !] to carry with an empty chamber. Admin finally gave him the nod after he proved he could bring the weapon to bear having cycled the slide on the way up. We were issued 9mm Glocks and, fortunately at the range, mine ejected, stripped a fresh cartridge and not a darn thing thing happened when I pulled the trigger. I racked the slide and a cartridge was ejected and a fresh cartridge went bang when I pulled the trigger. We retrieved the "dud" cartridge expecting to find a tiny dimple on the primer. Nothing. The department armorer couldn't determine whet was wrong and Glock flat denied it could happen. This was a well-shot in pistol and even though I wasn't all that thrilled with the Glock, I regularly scored 245-248 out of a possible 250. I just felt leery of it after that. We also had two Glocks [same production run] that discharged when dropped; something else the factory said couldn't happen. Glocks have come a long way since that time so long ago and I'm sure Glock has improved quality control. Hey, you manufacture a million items and there will be a few bad ones but I still shy away from the Glocks. Retired now, my choice of everyday carry is a stainless Combat Commander in an IWB; a CROSSBREED SUPERTUCK or UBG STRYKER. The CROSSBREED is a butt-ugly abomination of plastic and leather but superb for all day carry comfort. The STRYKER is a beautiful 100% all leather holster that will last me forever and is as comfortable as the ugly one. I requested Nate (a Marine) @ UBG add a band of leather to hold the mouth of the holster open to assure one-handed reholstering. My Combat Commander hides very well in either one even under the standard IWB 1-size larger T-shirt. If you want to carry that Glock, do so. Practice, practice practice and continue to do so after you settle on a holster. Best of luck.
     
  16. ThinkFastHolsters

    ThinkFastHolsters New Member

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    To the OP: I'm the same as you. Big guy, 6'2, about 275 and I carry my glock 19 daily in a concealment solutions black mamba holster (same concept as xbreed super tuck) and have no problem. I only holster and unholster once a day (luckily I haven't had to use it) when I head out for the day and when I'm going to bed. I would definitly say youre reading to much into it. Just like everyone else said, practice with a safe and cleared weapon, but once you get used to it you'll realize it's not as complicated as it seems. Hell, you might be comfortable with it by the time you read this!
     
  17. PSYCHOFREAK3

    PSYCHOFREAK3 New Member

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    It is getting easier (practicing with a cocked unloaded gun) I guess my point was to be as safe as possible, I know there will not be anything in or around the trigger guard upon holstering in the morning, but unless I can visibly check I feel like I have missed a step and am opening myself up to a ND. But either way if I find out I don't like it just means I have to get a holster for a 1911 and carry that instead.
     
  18. levelcross

    levelcross New Member

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    Hi, Psycho...I had the same feelings when I first started carrying my Glock. Like several others have said, CLEAR and CHECK the gun, practice holstering, draws AND dry fires until it is a natural action/reaction, not a planned movement. Planning will let you down, training will help keep you alive. Please keep your finger out of the trigger guard until your sights are on your target, what happens if you accidentally get your finger on the trigger :eek: while re-holstering.

    This is what I did and still do.
    Set up mirrors in front of you so you have multiple targets, not to watch how you holster your gun. Move the mirrors around the room to different locations, again with a CLEARED gun, keep practicing your draws each time dry firing, cocking and re-holstering your gun each and every time. When you re-holster your "EMPTY" gun listen for the click of the dry fire, you will be amazed I hope, I never did hear it while re-holstering.

    I picked up a few cheap full length mirrors at Lowes to do this and even use them outside. Turn them vertical and horizontal for different effects, elevate them with chairs or place them behind the couch to lower them, turn them at funny angles, place them 2/3rds behind a door way, use your imagination.

    Some call it an Accidental discharge, I feel it is always a Negligent Discharge unless it is proven to be a mechanical failure. Good luck
     
  19. PSYCHOFREAK3

    PSYCHOFREAK3 New Member

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    Levelcross thank you, I will try this as I haven't thought of it yet. But that is a perfect idea to try and calm my fears about holstering the gun when I cannot visually inspect what is happening behind me.