Cats gone

Discussion in 'Hunting Forum' started by tinbucket, Oct 15, 2020.

  1. sheriffjohn

    sheriffjohn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I agree about feral cats (and feral dogs). Coyotes will sometimes breed with dogs. We had a problem years ago with "coydogs". Someone near our place apparently had a Manx cat for we saw several feral cats with bob tails but haven't seen one in years.

    We have cat/dog doors which save a lot of trouble/mess in the house. My chickens are "free range" - automatic chicken door on the henhouse opens in the morning and closes at night. They are also "pets". Last week I found two eggs on my workbench in the garage. Chickens roam around when the door is open, picking up bugs and pecking at clear plastic jugs of wildbird seed I keep there. I trained them with peanuts and come when I call or follow me around. I started keeping the garage door closed mostly but one hen uses the cat door to get into the garage and subsequently to her "nest" on the workbench. "Management" (wife) said to let her lay eggs there so they'd be easy to find. Cats pay no attention to hens but do go into the henhouse for mice.

    Now that harvest season is here, mice and voles are everywhere. Both cats are busy doing their thing, as are the dogs. Hawks and owls, too. Saw two mature bald eagles going into town feeding on a roadkill raccoon.
     
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  2. Hookeye

    Hookeye Well-Known Member

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    Cats are hell on wildlife.
    Getting your cat fixed and turned loose doesnt change that.
    If one is on a farm and needs a couple mousers, so be it. Any other cat left to roam free is nothing but irresponsible.
    And as such, the beast paying the price of their less than knowledgeable owner.
    It gets shot, as it should, because somebody refuses to live in reality.

    TNR doesnt solve the problem. Even if not reproducing, people will dump more into an area ( not fixed ). So the effort must be constant. And fixed or not fixed, normal migration or displaced by territorial..

    an area may have a limit on capacity. That just means any new ones take the problem elsewhere.

    Its a feel good do nothing joke.
    Brits did a study and found the avg housecat turned loose to roam, food provided, killed something like 400 small animals a year.

    Ask the Australians about feral cats LOL.

    Keep your cat indoors. If outside as a mouser, fixed. Anything else.....shoot it.
     
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  3. Hookeye

    Hookeye Well-Known Member

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    If you like quail and rabbits....get rid of the cats.

    Wild quail on one farm, been therr 40 yrs. Owner wages war on cats.
    Scared the crap outta me bowhunting, sun just coming up and KA BOOM!
     
  4. hairbear1

    hairbear1 Well-Known Member

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    Just on that subject here are some figures from 2017-2018 financial year of estimated cats removed from the Australian environment by various groups being 134 organizations and 2618 individuals..........................316030 feral cats............. and that's those that are recorded so God only knows how many more were removed from the environment and not recorded.
     
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  5. Oldoutlaw

    Oldoutlaw Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Most of the bird and rabbit killing cats here belong to neighbors within a mile of me. 1/2 of them wear collars! The word feral is used too liberally for me. Some of those women have 5 or more cats! I've talked to several of the husbands and they dare not say or do any thing to keep them home and inside. They just say to me they won't miss any of them.

    I started eliminating the things a year ago. We've even had a few of those women come down our lane looking for their "poor lost or missing kitties." I practice "Shoot, Shovel, and Shut Up" about it.
     
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  6. Pasquanel

    Pasquanel Proud to be an American Supporter

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    Cats do not seem to be a problem around here, I suspect the wild-life takes care of them. I have been on this property for 35 years and only ever shot one cat and he was near the size of a bobcat!
     
  7. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member Admin Moderator Lifetime Supporter

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    Rule #1. Nobody loves your dog, your cat or your kid as much as you do
    Rule #2. Keep your dog, your cat or your kid in YOUR yard

    I'll be over in the simple solutions section if anybody needs me......
     
  8. alsaqr

    alsaqr Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Some feral cats survive surprisingly well in the wild. Twice large house cats have responded to my rabbit in distress call while calling coyotes. In both cases there were no homes within 2-3 miles. ​
     
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  9. sheriffjohn

    sheriffjohn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Than there's the animal hoarders. "Free to a good home" ads are like giving crack to an addict. First-hand experiences still give me a case of the pukes. One family had a pony living inside their house. Dogs on chains, even goats chained to tires. Children "living" there, too.

    Several cases we worked saw the Humane Society go with us, usually obtain a voluntary turn-over of critters with a stern warning. Not long after, spot-checks saw them with new batches of animals. Horses show up overnight. Fellow sheriff had a load of emus dumped.

    Anthropromorphic (assignation of human qualities to non-human critters) people do a lot of harm when they hold positions of power. Main prison had "cat patrol" after lockdown using pellet guns to get rid of feral cats.
     
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  10. Trunk Monkey

    Trunk Monkey Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]

    I'm probably too close to this issue because my cat is a feral rescue who slept in my car at work for a year before I brought her home.

    The thing that makes me so mad about this is it the cats are essentially innocent. They don't know they're doing anything wrong. They're just trying to survive.

    It's the stupid owners that are at fault but the cats are the ones that pay for it.
     
  11. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member Admin Moderator Lifetime Supporter

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    What he said ^^^.
     
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  12. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member Admin Moderator Lifetime Supporter

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    Truth. Animals shouldn’t be punished for stupid human’s actions.
     
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  13. RJF22553

    RJF22553 Well-Known Member

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    Your kitty is a spitting image on one of my barn cats. A feral (but spayed and vaccinated) kitten when we got him. 14 years later, he is a love-bug that mostly stays either in the barn or in my shop office. Also likes curling up in my arms when I'm at the computer there. If I take a nap there, he's curled right up next to me.
     
  14. hairbear1

    hairbear1 Well-Known Member

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    And that is the same problem with feral dogs in Australia which cause just as much damage to stock and wildlife.
    Both are only trying to survive and will revert to their natural instincts once they feel hungry which generally means attacking whatever is easiest to get. Both cats and dogs will breed with other feral cats and dogs and in the case of feral dogs here in Australia the big problem is when say a German Shepherd crosses with a feral dog and then you start getting a smarter and bigger feral dog.
    Obviously you'll never get rid of these ferals completely but getting rid of them whenever the chance presents itself helps a lot.
     
  15. Mowgli Terry

    Mowgli Terry Active Member

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    These fearsome creature are indoor cats. There are unintentional temporary escapes to freedom. We got coyotes that have moved into the area. The big tabby, Bubba, just showed up ten or so years ago. The small black cat, Stewball, came from the Humane Society. Both cats have been fixed.

    Cats in a Pile 1.jpg
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2020
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  16. Hookeye

    Hookeye Well-Known Member

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    I have two rescue cats.... in the house.
     
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  17. superc

    superc Active Member

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    The cat who is my icon here I had for 18 1/2 years. He was my mischievous buddy. He would turn on taps for water (and leave them running), seemed to understand English and came running to watch when the Walking Dead music came on. (He ran from the room in episode 1 when the little Zombie girl showed up, but crept back a few minutes later and missed not a single episode thereafter.) If he was made at me he would go in the kitchen or down to the basement work bench and find some stuff to just knock off the counter or the workbench. Nothing like hearing your glasses and plates shatter from 2 rooms away, LoL. In his prime he weighed 19 pounds and pretty much ruled. He got mad at my dog one time and urinated in the dog food bowl. Made the dog really upset. He'd sleep on the bed which was okay, except when he farted. Phew, go away, LoL. When I let him out he was always back in a few hours, often bringing me offerings like small snakes, baby rabbits, half a cardinal or blue jay, etc. At night he thought his white fur was camouflage, and would get annoyed when I could see him in the woods. But in the snow after dark he really could disappear if he wanted to. He actually pulled me out of a hypoglycemic diabetic coma late one night in 2016 by alternatively chewing on my nose, then slapping my cheek, over and over until eventually the weird sensations penetrated and I woke up, swigged some pancake syrup I kept nearby for just such an event and took my blood sugar reading. 27 AFTER the syrup. He saved my life. Doctor thinks he smelled the Acetone coming out of my pores, realized something was very wrong and woke me up the best he could. Sensor Cat. Who knew? One Saturday night he declined his supper and a day later I found him dead. I have no clue why he died. I miss him terribly. I have 2 more shelter cats, but it isn't the same.
     
  18. superc

    superc Active Member

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    TV time soon
    Mo waiting for TV time.jpg
    Freaking out the dog when it wakes up
    Making Sassy unhappy.jpg
    Guarding a GF's daughter while she sleeps
    Moe guarding.jpg
     
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  19. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member Admin Moderator Lifetime Supporter

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    Damn! He was huge. Great stories. There’s always that pet that really is a cut above the others.
     
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  20. sheriffjohn

    sheriffjohn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Have 2 spayed yellow Tomcats. Had to weigh them. Loki (age 2) - 20 pounds. Tom (age 8) - 11 pounds. Big one rode beside me on the golfcart this morning to check the henhouse, jumped off and waited for me to open the door for mouse patrol. He likes gun stuff, enjoys batting spent primers as they fall to the floor when I decap brass, sits and watches while I shoot off the benchrest with a .22. If he'd learn to point, I'll take him after quail next month.
     
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