Cats gone

Discussion in 'Hunting Forum' started by tinbucket, Oct 15, 2020.

  1. AgedWarrior

    AgedWarrior Well-Known Member

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    Domesticating animals causes them to loose their instincts for the wild and are thus endangered by being outside where their natural environment is. And, we need to realize that a lot of animals survive (species) because of their ability to multiply more rapidly and thus the species survives even though many individuals are taken by predators. A lot of pets do not fare well because we have ruined their ability to survive outside. People declaw cats to protect their furniture etc, but that cat has little chance of survival outside. To a certain degree, we love our pets to death; they don’t know how to hunt (mostly) or protect themselves any more. This is not the whole story, as there are cats and dogs that are not quite so domesticated and they do much better, but typically these animals tend to be more independent and not as cuddly.
    Some years back I had an Akita. She was the runt of the litter, and only grew to be about 100 lbs. She was fiercely protective yet gentle with children. She caught a crow trying to snitch some of her food once, and killed two cats who strayed into our yard. She was very fast. I used to take her with me up in the mountains in Nevada and later in New Mexico and let her run free some out in the woods. I do not know how many “encounters” she had, but I had to treat a few small wounds occasionally and remove a couple porcupine quills once. Typically she stayed reasonably close to me, and would show up fairly quick when I called her. I think she stayed close to protect me...
    She was a strong animal, a good hunter, and an incredible friend for almost 12 years. She would tolerate being in the house, and did not mess the house, but she loved being in the wild. In her latter years hip displasia caused her to suffer some. I would take her in the mountains then where there were cold streams running and she would submerge in them and stand with just her eyes and nose and ears out of the water and stay there for several minutes letting the cold water give her some relief from the aches and pains.
    I have had a few pets in my life; she was not a pet, but a companion. She could never replace people in my life, but she is the only animal in my life that I truly miss.
     
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  2. TelstaR

    TelstaR Well-Known Member

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    We do not have to turn back time. As I already stated, only the minority of domestic cats are considered to be indoor pets(Globally). Even in the USA, domestic cats are primarily outside pets and that status only grows as you look beyond the US.

    I accept that [you] might consider cats to be indoor pets and that [some] people do manage cats as indoor pets but that sentiment/trend does not seem dominant anywhere on the planet.

    The idea that ANY animal (domesticated or undomesticated) is not "supposed" to exist primarily outdoors is quite striking. I will of course make an exceptions for the animals that have been physically altered to the degree that they cannot survive outdoors or when a particular breed has been introduced to an unsuitable climate.

    Cats have historically been outside pets and are substantially capable of living unattended in the wild. What some people have decided to do in the past few decades hardly changes the broad consensus regarding philosophy of use, need or enjoyment. Thats just my personal take on it based on origins and history, not what people do in places like NYC.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2020
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  3. schnuffleupagus

    schnuffleupagus Well-Known Member

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    That is what i thought. My mother rescued a black and white cat, called him "jester"
    He lived with us for several years. Indoor-outdoor cat. Killing chipmunks and barn mice. Getting his *** kicked by raccoons and other critters.
    As he was getting old he brought us a kitten, a small gray and white kitten, like he himself had been washed and shrunk and faded.
    It is something to see a generally solitary tom cat clean a kitten. Not gentle or motherly at all.

    A curious thing
     
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  4. microadventure

    microadventure Well-Known Member

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    in re pets: call it by name. if it comes to you to see what you need it's a pet

    if it does not come when called it's just using you. you are it's pet.

    if you need to keep it penned up or caged, you are it's captor and it is your prisoner

    dogs are pets. any other animal, you are just fooling yourself.
     
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  5. schnuffleupagus

    schnuffleupagus Well-Known Member

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    Some cats come when you call them, sometimes
     
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  6. tinbucket

    tinbucket Well-Known Member

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    I've seen two flying squirrels in recent years. Dakota clamped down on one midways before I could stop him. Another one shows up, if possible I'll adopt it. i knew of kids who had them as pets, when I was young. They get inside your clothing, watch how you bend, they may nail you. Squirrels of all sorts were pets in the early days to many many kids and adults.
    As to cats outside, that is their natural environment. There are heated cat and dog houses on the Internet as well as heated pads for existing pet houses. We were brought up such that no pets were in our home.
     
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  7. RJF22553

    RJF22553 Well-Known Member

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    We have two barn cats. Got them both as feral kitten siblings small enough to almost hold in your hand in 2006. Trapped by a cat lady in Arlington VA who feeds the strays and provides barn owners with them on request. We requested both. Trapped on a Friday, spayed and vaccinated the next day, and delivered to us the next day. They didn't have a gracious opinion of human kind at that point. But they declared the barn as their domain and very seldom venture more than about 50' from it (and miles from any significant road). We fed them dry food and water, but they were mostly out-of-sight (hiding in the loft). It took 6+ years before one (the male) would even touch me; and another year before the other one would - both eating their dry food out of my hand.

    They are very wary of the wildlife, with pretty much their only threats early-on being foxes, owls, hawks, and coyotes. They're both about 15 healthy pounds now, tripping hazards, and very loving - particularly at meal time. At night, we keep the barn doors closed except for a narrow gap they can get through but not a 'yote. They even (wisely) ignored a possum passing through the barn seeking shelter from a bad storm a few years ago.

    Last year, I installed two cat doors: one in the overhead door to my main shed/garage, and one into my office/workshop inside. The male spends most all of his nights curled up in my climate-controlled office (and often on my arms when I attempt to type on the keyboard. The female most often spends her nights in a heated box I made for them years ago. She always greats me when I come down for morning chores. They each know their names. While comfortable being inside, we would never even try and take them into our home. They are perfectly happy as it is.

    In their years with us, they have done some bird-killing, one adolescent rabbit, and mice/moles/voles. As distasteful as that was for us, they at least ate their kill. Our neighbor's semi-outdoor cat kills for the pure enjoyment, sometimes watching an injured critter suffer for a bit before killing it, never eating its kills. Our cats ignore the toads and tree-frogs in the barn and are now spoiled enough they never go hungry.

    Perhaps they have "retired". They've got a good gig.
     
  8. Trunk Monkey

    Trunk Monkey Well-Known Member

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    Barn cats are different. I've got a couple of the feral cats at work into the barn cat program at my local humane society.

    I still think cats should be inside pets but some being a barn cat is the best you can get
     
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  9. tinbucket

    tinbucket Well-Known Member

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    Three of the cats have returned. I have no idea as to what transpired. Something scared them off the rear porch an out of their house. A Raccoon, I don't think so, Certainly not the opossum that is feeding after they do. a Bobcat? A coyote on the rear porch? Np prints of any kind. Something scared them into the woods for days. Scared them enough not to come to feed. And the ones that didn't come back? These cats couldn't catch a squirrel or a turkey, or a rabbit, that SIL says he has seen two of. I figured the coyotes got them all. And for two nights the coyotes have not been howling. Could the Cougar or its cub seen some years ago now, 100 yards, I'm guessing, from the house come back and run the coyotes off?
    That would be a hoot and something we couldn't tolerate: a big cat(s) on the porches or around the house. Trail cameras being bought tomorrow and put up. You would think we would hear them scream once in a while, if around, though.
     
  10. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member Admin Moderator Lifetime Supporter

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    If they are not ‘fixed’ they may have gone out looking for mates.
     
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  11. RJF22553

    RJF22553 Well-Known Member

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    One (the male) of our two barn cats "disappeared" for almost a year. He had gone to our next-door neighbor's house and lived under their front porch. He convinced them they should feed him on occasion, and they did. The winter cold settled in along with light snow. The neighbors would also take an occasional vacation. With the first light dusting of snow, I noticed cat paw prints leading across one of our smaller pastures from their home to our barn and back again. Our cat food consumption also increased. Eventually, Spooky decided the gig in our barn (warm safe room with plenty of food and water) was better than under their front porch and he stayed. That was about 12 years ago.

    Sometimes, cats just go on a "walkabout" and return after a few days (or weeks or months).
     
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  12. hairbear1

    hairbear1 Well-Known Member

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    Feral cats in Australia are a huge problem especially for our fauna. Over the years I and my mates have shot some huge cats that you could nearly put a saddle on.

    Bloody idiots who have lost the love for Mr Tiddles take them out and let them loose in the scrub and it doesn't take long for a cat to revert to it's natural hunting instincts.

    I'm not much of a cat lover but tolerate them to a point BUT any cat that crosses my path in the scrub gets a attitude adjustment at a couple of thousand feet per second.
    Domestic cats that wander at night also get special attention and "disappear" if they wander into my yard as both my Red Cattle dog and the son's pig dog have a special Hell for them.

    There used to be a couple of feral cats that lived in the drains here till 1 sat too long and copped a CB cap from my BRNO .22 and 2 others copped a pellet in the head from my .177 BSA Meteor Super air rifle problem gone and the local native bird life have a chance to survive.
     
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  13. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    Sheriff,
    Your Squirrel story brought up great memories about Tiger.
    He loved to go down in the basement and hunt. Once in a great while a Mouse would somehow get into the walk in Basement. And he would kill it. Never would eat them but played with them until they died. Which brings me to my story. On that day Tiger was in the Basement doing his routine hunting venture. I wanted to shut the door into the house up from the Basement. So I called for him and shortly here he came up the Steps like always. But this time he was not alone. He brought us a present! A live Field Mouse! As he topped the steps in the Hallway he showed me the mouse, meowed and dropped it in front of me. The Mouse tore off and into the Bedroom and under the Closet Door and into the Closet. I literally tore the Closet apart looking for the little critter to no avail. Never saw him again. A week went by and in the other end of the house in the Kitchen's Pantry I opened up a Chips Ahoy Package that had been previously opened to eat some cookies. And then I saw it! That little Mouse had found one of the empty plastic compartments where cookies eaten before had been removed. He had made a Nest in that compartment with paper scraps and had plenty of cookies that he had sampled over the past week. I almost hated to mess up his Mouse Condo but caught it in a Trap the next day!:p

    03
     
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  14. Missouribound

    Missouribound Well-Known Member

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    There are several breeds which are hypoallergenic...Siamese being one of them
    I had one for several years and my wife was allergic to cat dander but the Siamese did not bother her one bit.
     
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  15. Missouribound

    Missouribound Well-Known Member

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    Cats kill 2-4 BILLION birds a year in the USA alone.
    Keep your cat in the house.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 21, 2020
  16. ellis36

    ellis36 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Years back I declared war on feral cats when I saw mockingbird or bluebird wings on the ground every morning when I went to the barn. Or worse, saw cats sitting on top of my bluebird houses swatting at the mama bird trying to defend her nest.

    I trapped over 45 cats in a years time at my barn. It was the same old thing. Summer people leave for home in the fall and leave their cats to fend for themselves in the woods.
    My woods, as it turns out! Breed and re-breed into wild animals. Wipe out the local bird population in just a couple of years. Not on my place!

    ellis
     
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  17. 7point62

    7point62 Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Depends on the cat. Our 2 cats are outdoor farm cats, a male and female. They are both awesome hunters, but the female is by far the best.
     
  18. tinbucket

    tinbucket Well-Known Member

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    It's been awhile since I had to shoot some feral cats. A year or two ago I saw two well kept cats sitting at the edge of the woods. They had to come miles to get here. I didn't have a gun handy. These cats, obviously someone put them out here...and now I have to deal with them.
    I enjoy the company of all animals but if these show any evidence of feeding on wildlife they will disappear. I will just ahve to tell everyone they wondered off.
     
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  19. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member Admin Moderator Lifetime Supporter

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    Feral cats can really ruin the ecology.
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2020
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  20. ellis36

    ellis36 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    They eat every day. Once they learn that a bird nest may contain food that's their go-to choice. Easy pickings! In spring when nesting season has begun that means one bird out of a mating pair or a brood of baby birds about every day. If they kill the mama bird before the eggs hatch the reproduction cycle is interrupted. If they kill the mama bird while the young are in the nest the young ones starve. If they kill the male bird the young may well starve. If they eat the young the season is lost. It's easy to imagine the dent the 45 cats just in my neck of the woods made on the wildlife.

    I blame the thoughtless, uncaring people who created the problem.

    ellis
     
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