casting Aluminum bullets?

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by poboyspecial, Aug 13, 2015.

  1. poboyspecial

    poboyspecial New Member

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    Does anyone have experience or experimented with casting aluminum bullets?
    Has anyone tried making 12g slugs from casted aluminum?
     
  2. gunman41mag

    gunman41mag Well-Known Member

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    Wouldn't the bullet be a lite-weight
     

  3. hmh

    hmh New Member

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    I have never cast aluminum but all my cast are aluminum. I do have some old .45 acp that are aluminum I think the atf made them stop producing them.
     
  4. hiwall

    hiwall Well-Known Member

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    I have cast bullets out of light weight babbitt metal. I only used them in a 22 hornet. About the opposite of a 12 gauge slug.
     
  5. JonM

    JonM Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    it would be exceptionally ineffective.

    so no.

    problems, very lightweight shortens the range with increase in velocity loss as it moves downrange. since aluminum will not expand to grip the grooves of the rifling well, accuracy will be extremely poor. what contact it does make in your barrel will destroy the barrel in short order
     
  6. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member Admin Moderator Lifetime Supporter

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    Back in the 80s we did some experimentation with lathe turned aluminum bullets. Depending on the alloy, aluminum melts at around twice the temp of lead, and the metal contracts more as it cools- leaving an overheated mold, and an undersized bullet.

    We played with a few different alloys to find one that would be engraved by rifling, but not foul the barrel. Our goal was to find a defense round with sharply limited range. Did not work that well. Remember energy equals speed squared times mass. They were fast (my lord, they were fast) but mass was too light to carry any significant energy. A .357 weighed about 38 grains.

    Bullets were also too hard to expand. We gave it up.
     
  7. hmh

    hmh New Member

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    Underwood ammo uses a sold copper turned on a lathe with fluting that causes similar damage as a hollow point and penetration similar to a fmj. I think this or the federal gaurd dog design is going to be the future of bullets.
     
  8. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Zinc is about the lightest alloy used in bullet casting. Some folks have had good results with it. No expansion, but very high velocity has some significant shock value. Melting point similar to Lead.

    NEVER use an Aluminum mold for Zinc. The two metals are fond of each other and WILL stick BADLY.

    Just stick with Lead. Centuries of experimentation has not found anything better.

    For shotgun slugs, I like a 20-1 Lead-Tin alloy. Flow characteristics better than pure Lead. A bit less leading problems, but still has good expansion in the target.
     
  9. poboyspecial

    poboyspecial New Member

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    I appreciate all the comments and advice, is it true that the aluminum causes fouling in the barrel that solvents can't remove?






    ps I have been persuaded NOT to try the aluminum casting, thanks for input.
     
  10. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member Admin Moderator Lifetime Supporter

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    Sometimes. It's called metal fouling. It can be from a soft lead bullet driven at a too high speed, or copper jacket material that rubs off- rough bores foul more quicly.

    A number of gun cleaning solvents can remove copper (Hoppes was developed for that) A greenish patch is copper coming out. Lead is loosened by most solvents, removed by mechanical act of brushing, 22 rimfire rarely metal fouls a good barrel,

    I have leaded up a .38 revolver shooting a LOT of soft lead ammo, and used a Lewis de-leader to clean it- but most solvents handle minor fouling. There are also electrolytic de-foulers- search older posts here on how to build one.

    Rarely I am cleaning a 100 year old MILSURP rifle, and just can't get crud out of the grooves. Fill the bore with a wonderful penetrant called Kroil, let set a day, crud comes right out.
     
  11. crossfire

    crossfire Member

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    If you want a light bullet, cast it of zinc with an aluminum siding nail as its core. As mentioned, the zinc will bond to the aluminum. As also mentioned, you cannot use an aluminum mold to do this.
    It isn't worth the effort. Velocity falls off way too fast. They do make great bore scrubbers though.