Featured Cartridge-firing handguns in the UK - long read.

Discussion in 'General Handgun Discussion' started by tac foley, Feb 14, 2020.

  1. tac foley

    tac foley Well-Known Member

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    Remembering that the UK is made up of FOUR distinct locations, England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales, and Great Britain is the Big Island of England, Scotland and Wales, and nothing more, here are the present laws concerning to ownership of cartridge-firing handguns in Great Britain ONLY -

    This, by the way, is from the website of Bedford Gun Club, located about 25 miles from me -
    Heritage Firearms

    Introduction.

    BCRPA operates what we term our Heritage Pistol Scheme. The scheme is operated under section 7(3) of the 1997 Firearms Amendment Act. This permits use of a limited number of cartridge pistols (considered worthy of preservation) at the Bedford Range by members with a genuine interest in these firearms.

    A brief overview of the scheme follows, together with selected information on the background of the scheme and relevant parts of firearms law.

    The current standard conditions and Heritage arms procedure are contained in chapter 12 of the Members Handbook.

    Background.

    The Firearms (Amendment) Act of 1997 (FAA97) placed most cartridge pistols into Section 5 of the 1968 Firearm Act, i.e. they became prohibited weapons requiring approval of the Home Secretary for possession. However, a number of exceptions were created, one of these covered Firearms of Historic Interest. Section 7 of the FAA97 addresses Firearms of Historic Interest; it splits them into two separate groups of pistols as follows:

    Section 7(1): Pistols kept in this category may be possessed on a firearm certificate and can be kept at home. They are to be kept only as part of a collection and may not be fired.

    To be eligible for 7(1) the pistol must have been made before January 1st 1919 and chambered in a cartridge that is not readily available.

    Readily available cartridges are defined in law as:

    .22 rimfire
    .25 ACP
    .25-20
    .32 ACP
    .32-20
    .32 S&W Long
    7.62 Tokarev
    .38-40
    .380 Auto
    9mm Parabellum
    .38 S&W
    .38 Special
    .380 British Service
    .44 Special
    .44-40
    .45 ACP
    .45 Colt

    Pistols chambered in any of the above cartridges are not eligible for 7(1) status. They may however be entitled to 7(3) status provided that they meet one of the 7(3) criteria described below.

    Section 7(3): Pistols in this category must be kept at a designated secure site. They may be fired. It is section 7(3) pistols that may be used at the Bedford Range.


    For a pistol to be eligible for section 7(3) it must meet at least one of the following criteria (these are discussed in greater depth under the heading “Pistols Eligible for Section 7(3) Status”.):

    • Particular rarity
    • Aesthetic quality
    • Technical interest
    • Historical importance
    The pistol can however be of any age and chambered in any calibre (provided of course that it meets at least one of the criteria).

    The culmination of several years effort has resulted in the Bedford Range being designated by the Secretary of State as a place suitable for the purposes of section 7(3) of the Firearm (Amendment) Act 1997. Our scheme has been running since 2002.

    Purpose of the Section 7(3) exemption.

    The purpose of this exemption is to allow important firearms to be preserved, studied and researched. Whilst section 7(3) firearms may be fired it is not intended that they be kept for the purposes of competitive target shooting. A useful analogy is to compare a section 7(3) site with an organisation such as the Shuttleworth Collection of aircraft, where important aircraft are kept in working order and occasionally flown. A significant purpose of Shuttleworth is to preserve rare aircraft and to provide a historic resource centre for the study and appreciation of the development of aviation. Similarly a section 7(3) site provides the opportunity to preserve significant firearms and allow the study and appreciation of firearms and their development.

    The BCR&PA Heritage Pistol Scheme.

    This is what we are calling the administration of our section 7(3) site. It is open to all full members of the Association. It falls totally outside our status as a Home Office approved club. Consequently members may only possess firearms that are authorised on their firearms certificates. For this reason there can be no such thing as a club gun.

    Pistols Eligible for Section 7(3) Status.

    The following is an attempt to provide a concise guide to section 7(3) eligibility. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure its accuracy, the Association cannot be held liable for any errors or omissions etc! It is strongly recommended that anyone wishing to proceed with an application for section 7(3) pistols on their firearms certificate should first carefully read the appropriate sections of the Firearms (Amendment) Act 1997 and ‘The Home Office Firearms Law Guidance to The Police’. Both are available on-line as follows:-

    Firearms (Amendment) Act 1997 (Section 7)
    1997 Firearms Amendment Act
    The Home Office Firearms Law Guidance to The Police (Chapter 9)
    Home Office Guidance to Police on Firearms Law
    For a pistol to be eligible for section 7(3) it must meet at least one of the following criteria:

    • Particular rarity
    • Aesthetic quality
    • Technical interest
    • Historical importance
    a) Particular Rarity

    Note the requirement for particular rarity. The Home Office use the Gabbett Fairfax Mars as an example of a pistol that would qualify. In order to gauge the significance of this it is worth remembering fewer than 100 were originally produced. It would be reasonable to expect that extremely rare variants of more common guns would qualify, as would pre-production development pieces.

    b) Aesthetic Quality

    This covers pistols that have been extensively modified to enhance their appearance. Firearms made or modified after 16th October 1996 are not eligible. Expect to have to demonstrate some genuine artistic merit or a significant increase in financial value due to the aesthetic enhancement. There is limited case law on this, Kendrick v Chief Constable West Midlands Constabulary held a modern presentation gun not to be of Aesthetic Quality. Factory produced commemoratives are unlikely to qualify.

    c) Technical Interest

    This encompasses firearms with some noteworthy technical feature. Examples include but are not limited to guns that demonstrate a technical solution to a particular issue, guns with unique design features not widely copied in other guns, or firearms which were the first in a significant field.

    d) Historic Importance

    The Home Office offer a number of different criteria that would be grounds for regarding a particular pistol as being of historic interest.

    Firearms owned by a famous historic figure or by someone involved in events of historic importance, would be regarded as being qualified for section 7(3) status under this heading. Evidence supporting the provenance would be required.

    Guns made before 1919 may be considered of historic importance due to their age and rarity. Guns made after 1945 are unlikely to qualify on age alone.

    Anything that would be considered antique for the purposes of section 58(2) of the 1968 Firearms Act can be regarded as of historic importance. Antique firearms that are sold, transferred, purchased, acquired or possessed as a curiosity or ornament fall outside of the scope of the firearms acts i.e. they do not require any authority such as a firearms certificate, shotgun certificate or section 5 authority to possess. If an antique firearm is possessed for any other purpose than as a ‘curiosity or ornament’ then the appropriate authority to possess is required. Consequently if, for example, it was desired to conduct research that involved firing an early cartridge pistol (such as a 12mm pinfire or 5.5mm Velo-Dog revolver), it would be possible to do so under section 7(3) at a designated site.

    Guns, which on their own would not be regarded as historically important, may be properly considered historically important if they are acquired to augment an established collection. In such a case it is the whole collection that is considered historically important. The gun would only be considered to be of historical importance whilst it is an integral part of the appropriate collection. In such cases the pistol in question may loose its eligibility for section 7(3) status if the owner sells it (or sells the original collection it was purchased to enhance).

    Questions.

    It is hoped that the forgoing provides a useful overview of the salient points of the Associations Heritage Pistol Scheme and associated firearms law. Questions concerning the Heritage Pistol Scheme can be asked via the CONTACT US section.

    Meanwhile, over in Northern Ireland, where back in 1997 the Legislative Assembly told the Westminster government to go p*ss up a rope, all you need to buy ANY kind of handgun is a current Firearms Certificate with that calibre entered on it as a free slot.

    Why?

    Because in spite of almost thirty years of murder and mayhem, during that time only ONE person had been killed with a legally-held handgun, and even that was not by the owner.
     
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  2. SSGN_Doc

    SSGN_Doc Well-Known Member

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  3. manta

    manta Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yes they know here that law abiding citizens with guns were not a issue, criminal thugs with illegal firearms were the problem. But when it comes to firearms UK politicians see gun control as a easy vote winner, and most citizens would not be concerned if they announced they were banning all firearms tomorrow.

     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2020
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  4. tac foley

    tac foley Well-Known Member

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    IMO Ms Mo Mowlam, ugly, but much-missed, should be the appointed patron saint of gun-owners nationwide.
     
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  5. manta

    manta Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yes but she was for gun control, she did not ban them here because of pressure from Unionist Politicians as part of the negotiating of the Good Friday Agreement. Sinn Fein were trying to include illegally owned IRA firearms with legal owned civilian firearms in decomposition. No Unionist Politician could agree to comparing illegally owned IRA firearms used for murder, with legal owned civilian firearms. As for the rest of the UK i would stick to black powder or maybe a LBR, too many restrictions and hoops to jump trough for the others.

     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2020
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  6. Mercator

    Mercator Well-Known Member

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    My takeaway:
    1. P*ss up a rope. Never heard before. Awesome.
    2. A feeling of sadness. The gun may not be a collectible but it may become such if added to an existing collection. A government bureaucrat’s dream.
    3. N Ireland is the place to live in exile if the Democrats ever have their way.
     
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  7. manta

    manta Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Give them time, they will try and ban them here as well.

    Gun Control Network
    Our Key Objectives. GCN was established to campaign for progressively tighter controls on guns in the UK.
     
  8. tac foley

    tac foley Well-Known Member

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    Let us NOT forget that the Gun Control 'Network' consists of Mr Robert-Marshall Andrews, his wife, Gill, and their dog [maybe the dog is no longer a member, not sure.]

    As a measure of their desperation, let's just take a peek at their 2020 stats thus far from their own site -

    We became aware of at least three reports in January 2020 concerning gun deaths:

    § A man found dead in the garden of his home in Bearsden, East Dunbartonshire is believed to have shot himself. The deceased, a gun expert who ran his own clay pigeon shooting firm, was said to have been suffering “serious health problems”. A police spokesperson said that the death is being treated as non-suspicious.


    What the rest of us call a suicide.

    § It has emerged that a man was shot dead at a house in Hartlepool, Co. Durham in September last year. Four men have been charged with murder and two others are wanted in connection with the attack. The victim is reported to have served as a sniper in the Kurdish military against the so-called Islamic State.

    What the rest of us call a criminal shooting. Also, it figured in LAST year's stats, as well, so it really doesn't count for 2020, does it?

    § Emergency services responding to a concern for the safety of a male at an address in St. Helens, Merseyside, found a man critically ill with a gunshot wound. Police subsequently confirmed the man’s death, which is not being treated as suspicious. A post-mortem will be carried out to establish the cause of death.

    What the rest of us call a suicide.

    Yawn....................................
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2020
  9. rock185

    rock185 Active Member

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    tac, it would seem that politicians in the UK have much in common with politicians on the Left in the US. That is, that actual effectiveness, or ineffectiveness, of draconian gun laws does not really matter. Decreasing "gun crime", and increasing safety of the public are just talking points. The actual intent is to make legal ownership and use of firearms so onerous, that fewer and fewer people will be willing to jump through all the arduous legal hoops to do so. Thereby, over time, reducing legal firearm ownership to as near zero as possible. Some things are the same on both sides of the pond...
     
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  10. freefall

    freefall Well-Known Member

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    This is incredibly sad. And it's starting in Virginia.
    We MUST ACT!
     
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  11. echo1

    echo1 Active Member

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    I'm a Kali occupant and have watched them ATTEMPT to neutralize ownership.

    VA went full retard right from the git-go. Yoos guys better jump on it. PAX
     
  12. freefall

    freefall Well-Known Member

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    And it's spreading to AZ!
     
  13. rock185

    rock185 Active Member

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    Sad but true freefall, sb 1624 and sb 1625. And it could well be, that after the next election, Rootin' Tootin' Gun Totin' Arizonans could wake up to having two liberal Democratic senators.....
     
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