Carrying a Glock loaded concealed vs unloaded

Discussion in 'Concealed Carrying & Personal Protection' started by Browningauto, Nov 4, 2010.

  1. Browningauto

    Browningauto New Member

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    Having bought a Glock 23 several months ago and carrying same concealed for the same amount of time, I have this question: Should I carry a Glock with a round in the chamber or not?

    Several law enforcement officers have told me they don't carry with a round in the chamber, but have never explained why. Do Glocks have a problem when carried in that manner? If carrying concealed, why would you NOT have a round in the chamber ready to fire? I'm confused with this situation. Aren't Glocks safe to carry in this manner?

    Would appreciate some input, until then I'll continue carrying ready to fire.
     
  2. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    carrying a glock or xd with a round in the chamber is the same thing as carrying any other handgun with the hammer cocked and safety off. some folks are comfy with it others arent. its pretty much personal pref. no modern pistol will discharge unless someone yanks the trigger.

    one other thing lots of AD have occured over the years with glocks in police depts. mostly its lack of paying attention, lack of training, or just the individual being an idiot. safety devices dont make guns idiot proof only the person carrying the handgun not being an idiot makes them idiot proof...
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2010

  3. Sh00tnButt

    Sh00tnButt New Member

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    i have carried for years only guns with manual safeties .. but, i never put my finger on the trigger until i am ready to pull the trigger .. i now own a G19 and i feel confident i am not going to have a AD or ND .. i ALWAYS carry one in the tube .. that is my personal preference .. and i am NOT pulling my gun no matter what unless i plan on firing it ..
     
  4. Glasshartt

    Glasshartt New Member

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    I always have one in the chamber. When the SHTF, you are not going to have time to tell the bad guy "Wait a minute, I have to rack one into the chamber."
     
  5. havasu

    havasu Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    I agree with JonM. When you go on patrol, your Glock shoud be loaded and one in the chamber. Our dept has had 3 AD's, and it was carelessness that caused it, and usually after hooking up the sam browne and holstering the weapon. They would be BS'ing with another person in the locker room, and forget to pull their finger out of the trigger guard when slamming it into the holster. One guy had a .40 round enter his thigh, thru his kneecap, down his ankle, and thru his foot. He was out for quite a long time!
     
  6. NGIB

    NGIB New Member

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    It's probably OK as long as you're not an NFL player...
     
  7. FreedomFighter69

    FreedomFighter69 New Member

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    Glocks do infact have three safetys on them and all three are controlled by the trigger.
    As long as you don't pull that trigger it won't go off. You can drop it, throw it, slam it in your holster and it won't go off. Just remember to keep your finger off that trigger if you don't want it to fire ! The cops who told you that may have not wanted "you" to carry it that way. All law enforcement keeps one up the pipe, in battery, and ready to go.
     
  8. WoodysKJ

    WoodysKJ New Member

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    I just saw one of my biggest pet peeves.

    There is no such thing as an AD (Accidental Discharge)

    There is only ID (Intended Discharge) and ND (Negligent Discharge)

    Any time a fire arm is discharged and it was not done intentionally it is NEGLIGENT. Human error ALWAYS plays a role in it.

    With that off my chest... The officers you have spoken with are probably carrying their duty and back-up glocks that way because their department policy requires them to make damned sure they need to discharge their weapons.

    Fact is the Glock Safe action pistol is one of the safest, if not the safest, firearm to carry.
     
  9. havasu

    havasu Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Sorry, but I have to call you out on something. Have you ever been in an auto collision? Was it an accident, or was it negligence? As they say, "crap happens" and yes humans (and computers) make mistakes, but is there negligence involved?
     
  10. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Calling an auto collision an "accident" is a huge misnomer. Having investigated over 1000 traffic collisions, I can say they are not accidents. At least one party involved made a mistake because of negligence, carelessness, intoxication or just plain stupidity. Yes, there are no (or damn few) AD's. Keep your boogerhook off the bang switch and the gun will not go off.
    IMHO, if you are not competent enough to carry a handgun with a loaded chamber, you are not competent enough to carry and handgun. You need to get more training, period.
     
  11. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    AD or ND is splitting hairs and best left to lawyers. everyone here knows what was meant. the weapon went off unintentionaly. negligence idiocy stupidity malicious trigger yanking whatever we all know what it means some one had a moment of idiocy and yanked the switch.
     
  12. fixxer

    fixxer New Member

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    I'm with these guys. Glocks are built with inherent safeties to prevent unintended discharge. Personally, I wouldn't bother to carry it unless it were ready to fire. I prefer to see them as more of a double action, similar to the revolver triggers. I think the trigger mechanism is consider as "double action", which allows some jurisdictions to issue them to the PD. I might be mistaken, but I believe New York is one state that wouldn't allow them otherwise. My glock trigger pull is a heavier than my .44Mag's double action pull is. I guess the short answer is YES, one in the pipe is ideal.
     
  13. DrumJunkie

    DrumJunkie New Member

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    Carrying any weapon with nothing in the chamber is carrying an unloaded weapon. And an unloaded weapon does you no good if/when you need it. When the time comes that you actually need your carry weapon things are going to happen really fast. It's not like TV where you always have time to rack a slide. Try this some time. Holster an UNLOADED weapon. Then have someone time you and draw that weapon and rack the slide then bring it up like you would if you would have to so you can save your bacon. Then go check out just how long it takes a man to cover 25 feet of ground. It's really no time at all. And in most all cases I would imagine that the bad guy will have a weapon brandished while covering that 25 feet. You will see pretty fast that you are putting yourself at a huge disadvantage.

    If you are not comfortable carrying a loaded weapon you have to ask two questions. One bweing why am I not comfortable carrying this particular weapon? The second is there a weapon that I can feel comfortable carrying loaded?

    An unloaded weapon is a paperweight and can not do the job you paid for it to do. It can (will) cause you many more troubles that any feeling of safety it can provide.

    A Glock just like any other weapon have only one real safety. And it's in that thing you hold your that up with. Keep your booger hook off the bang switch until you are ready and willing to put a hole in something. This is where training comes in to play. People that have to use a weapon in their day to day life train so that when the time comes that they need their weapon they can.A civilian with a CCW should do the same. In doing this you will become more familiar with your weapon not just hanging on your side but in your hands as well. Drawing drills are great for teaching yourself how to present your weapon in a manner that will not allow for a negligent discharge. Reinforcing the idea that you can safely draw your weapon without something bad happening.
     
  14. havasu

    havasu Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    Well said Drum Junkie!
     
  15. WDB

    WDB New Member

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    I don't believe ANY LEO is packing with out one one the tube. There is no time between draw and fire in that profession to rack the slide. IMHO the OP either lives in Mayberry or is trying to qualify there choice to carry in a less than ready state. A firearm is like any other tool, it has to be ready to preform when needed. You would't keep the batteries out of a flashlight until the power goes out would you? It's mili seconds that defines life and past life in a situation where you need your firearm, don't let racking the slide be the deciding point.
     
  16. silentghost

    silentghost New Member

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    Carry how you want to, it is personal preference. If you practice you can incorporate racking the slide into your draw stroke. Does this add time???? Maybe a couple hundredths of a second, if that. Then of course you can start factoring all the other variables that may or may not happen. What if you lose the use of one arm, etc... Situational awareness is a big factor, as you will never outdraw someone point a gun at you.
     
  17. WoodysKJ

    WoodysKJ New Member

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    You are partially correct. In fact NY city's officer carry a glock version that has a heavier trigger pull installed. It is call "The New York Trigger." it is designed to be much heavier and to make the officer be damned sure he or she wants to pull it. Glock makes a "Target Trigger" (Lighter than stock) and the "New York Trigger" heavier.

    As far as the earlier post asking about "Auto Accidents" I can see that he is living with his head in the sand. In fact I have been in an "Auto Accident"

    Fact is if the little bullet proof testosterone filled jack *** hadn't been trying to race his cousin and passing him on a hill and being in my lane the "ACCIDENT" would never have happened and I would not have needed to pull my self out of a burning car with 38 broken bones. A combined frontal impact speed of OVER 135 mph. TOTAL stupidity and NEGLIGENCE.

    Sorry had to vent

    I DARE you to show me an "ACCIDENT" involving either an automobile or a firearm. When Humans are involved there is no such thing. There are mistakes, not accidents.
     
  18. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    humans are always involved. a little extra training or paying attention driving a little slower or faster may avoid things but accidents can and do happpen.

    so you would say hitting a piece of debris blown into the road colliding with a large animal at nite that jumps out of the ditch into road or some mechanical part failing when it showed no previous signs or hitting a patch of unseen ice are not accidents?? my condolences for you being the victim of a moron and no one here is not saying the overwhelming majority of gun AD are actually idiots yanking the trigger at the wrong time.
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2010
  19. Greebo

    Greebo New Member

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    I have to say when I first got my G-19 I was nervous about carrying it chambered, partly because prior to that I only had my P226 which I could carry chambered but de-cocked, but mostly the nerves were down to the sh!ttie holster I had at the time, combined with the fact that till the snow hits my primary vehical is my motorcycle, however once I upgraded to a better holster with good retention (currently using the Fist Inc kydex iwb) I stopped being nervous about it and now it's chambered at all times, never had any fears with the new holster....but at the end of the day it's a personal preference...most ppl will say that when it hits the fan you need it chambered because you will not have time to rack, I disagree - outside of LE/military or unless you've p!ssed of some seriously hardcore thugs most situations are not wild west quick draw scenarios and will allow you (as long as you practice) plenty of time to draw, move and rack, then shoot.
     
  20. DrumJunkie

    DrumJunkie New Member

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    If you are driving on a road that larger animals may pop out on you then you need to watch your speed and watch for them. Many people around here hit deer and it's most often they are driving on a road with woods on either side and treating it like an interstate. Be aware of your surroundings and adjust your speed accordingly.
    If you take care on your vehicle you will know if some part is wearing out to the point of falling off. Use a wire hanger to fix a muffler is not proper maintenance.
    Debris...Again...Be aware of your surroundings. Ice on a road? really?? If it's cold enough to ice a road then you should expect ice and plan accordingly.