Can you clue me in to your firing "habits"?

Discussion in '.22 Rifle/Rimfire Discussion' started by therhino, Dec 9, 2010.

  1. therhino

    therhino New Member

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    I'm back with another question, all. Annoying newbies!

    I'm still trying to decide on my first .22 rifle, and am now at the point where I have a couple clear options. All are older rifles with solid reputations, but one defining factor amongst them is how rounds are loaded. Some of the rifles I'm looking at are tube-fed, and others have removable magazines.
    I'm trying to decide which I prefer.

    For example, one of the rifles I'm looking at is the Mossberg 151MB. Tube magazine. The tube is listed as being able to hold 10-14 rounds. That seems like plenty, but how long is the reload time between magazines?

    Another model I'm looking at is the Springfield 84C. This one has a removable magazine, which would allow me to purchase multiples, load them all at once, and fire all of the rounds in a short amoutn of time. 10-round mags are the max capacity, though, and they are about $20 per.

    I'm unsure which route to go in. On the one hand, I like the tube magazine, because it's integrated into the rifle, and cannot be lost. I do not like the length of reload time.
    On the other hand, I'm familiar with removable magazine rifles, having carried 180 round loads of 5.56mm for four years of my life with my M16A2.

    I think the deciding factor will be general firing habits, so that's where I need your advice. When you're out in the back yard, or at the range, how much ammo do you have loaded into removable mags at any one time? Do you load 2-4 mags at once and fire out?
    How long is your typical reload time when using a tube-fed rifle?

    Obviously, I know reload time isn't a huge issue for .22LR ammo, since it's not a "combat" rifle. I won't be repelling the Red Horde with this thing. I'll be plinking cans and bottles in my back yard. But, ease of use and time spent is still important.

    Thanks in advance for any advice or insight you can throw at me.
     
  2. Jo da Plumbr

    Jo da Plumbr New Member

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    If you are used to an M16 I'm suprised you are not wanting an auto loder.
     

  3. birdie

    birdie New Member

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    go ruger 1022 i wouldnt consider any antiquated tube fed. Also you can trick one out wit all kinds of neat stuff!
     
  4. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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  5. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    I bet a 151 will shoot rings around most stock 10/22's. How is tube feed so antiquated? Sure it has been around for a long time so has mag feed rifles. IIRC the first machine gun (Gatlin) was mag feed.

    The tube feed is also a very good feeding system. Most of which is fewer problems with crapy mags or bent feed lips because some one dropped them.
     
  6. birdie

    birdie New Member

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    well you cant usually find aftermarket stocks or upgrades for tube fed rifles if thats fine wit you then thats perfect for you. I always want to soup up my stuff and also most stock stuff is soso imho.
     
  7. Fisherking

    Fisherking New Member

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    For me shooting is a stress reliver. I enjoy my time shooting and don't want to be rushed. I find the reloading of magazines alows the barrel to cool.
    But to your question I usaly load 2 mags of ten shoot both and reload.
    P.S. when I get in the mood for some real target practice I pull out the smoke polls which take a while to reload and shoot. I definatly don't want to waist a shot so I find this helps improve my trigger control and sight acusition, aswell as my mental wellbeing.
    F.K.
     
  8. therhino

    therhino New Member

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    Thanks for the fast ideas, all.

    While I'm familiar with assault and combat rifles, I just don't need one right now. I'm starting small with a .22 so I can plink quietly in the woods without disturbing anyone, get my marksmanship fundamentals back, and teach the wife to shoot. .223 would be ok for her, but much more expensive to practice with, and require a better backstop than 5 acres of woods behind the house.

    I was not aware they had speedloaders for tube feeds. Thanks! No kids, either. Maybe in a couple years.

    The Ruger 10/22 just isn't my style. Sure, it's high-speed, low-drag, but I can't see the utility in tricking out a .22LR rifle with picatinny rails, flashlight mounts, laser sights, and flare launchers. ;) I like the old stuff in a .22. Something I can do some restoration work on, and point at and say "That rifle is older than my dad, but still fires true."
    Now, if I ever step up into the .223 arena again, I'll definitely be taking a hard look at the Mini-14 ranch rifles.
     
  9. birdie

    birdie New Member

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    well I see your point i have an old 22 I payed $15 for when i was about 12. it still serves me well and i have refinished the stock and rebluded the bbl, it shoots good after many thousand rounds.
     
  10. dteed4094

    dteed4094 New Member

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    I have 4 tube fed, 3 single shots, 2 mag fed. I wish the mag fed were tube fed. It takes longer for me to load a mag than it does a tube with twice as many rounds. Pull the plunger, dump in the rounds, slide the plunger in and go.
     
  11. Cory2

    Cory2 New Member

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    Tube fed definately loads faster than detachable magazines. The benefit of a magazine is that you can have many meaning the effective reload time is much faster for a magazine fed if you have to shoot fast.
     
  12. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    i prefer mag feed to tube fed. with mag feed i can drop the mag pop the round out of the chamber weapon clear. tube fed its a bit of a hassle.

    mag fed i find easier to load than tube fumbling around trying to orient the rounds and drop them into the tube instead of the ground. gotta hold the gun upside down or up with your hand or head over the muzzle or balance it in an awkward orientation to load.

    mag feed is easier to clear jams. tube feed ive had to do a dissassembly at times to clear jams.

    ive had both kinds over the years and i have never regreted getting rid of the tube feed rifles.
     
  13. DocWard

    DocWard New Member

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    I was raised shooting Marlin 60s. I currently have a Winchester 9422M and a Browning pump action .22. All tube fed. I have magazine fed rifles as well, and enjoy shooting them all.


    On a hot day at the range, the tube fed rifles can get a bit warm to the touch during reloads if you are putting a lot of rounds down range. While the same can be said for mag feds, loading without touching the barrel is easier. However, I agree that tube fed rifles are much easier to load, and quicker than loading a magazine. I'm confident that starting with ammunition in a box, a person can load and fire 50 rounds through a tube fed rifle much faster than they can through a magazine fed rifle. In essence, the reload speed with mag fed rifles comes from time spent prior to shooting.

    My personal opinion is that both have advantages, and you should just decide what is right for you.

    Oh, you mentioned teaching your wife to shoot. If you take her to one of the Appleseed Project shoots, my understanding is that a magazine fed rifle does much better for their shooting events, which are modeled after military courses of fire, with reloads occurring during the course.
     
  14. M14sRock

    M14sRock New Member

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    If you are familiar with the operation of the M16, you should check out the S&W M&P22. It will feel like old home week.
     
  15. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    You know I have to say I have handled one and I just may have to get one so that I am not slinging filthy 22lr down my nice SS match grade barrel.
     
  16. Snakedriver

    Snakedriver New Member

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    I go both ways, they each have their place. ;):D:rolleyes::cool:
     

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  17. M14sRock

    M14sRock New Member

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    S&W says the M&P22 has a match grade barrel, but I only shot up the dez with one last week. It did keep every round on an 8" popper at 50 yards offhand as fast as I could fire it.

    I am picking one up later this month and will see how it does on paper at the range. It may end up allowing me to thin the herd a bit and sell the 10/22 and TC Classic.

    I love that it works exactly the same as an AR, and is the same size.

    Very few guns excite me any more, but the M&P22 was one of those that did.
     
  18. therhino

    therhino New Member

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    Thanks for the additional feedback, all.

    I like the look of that M&P22m, though it's out of my price range for a while. My "fun money" fund is only $200/month, and I split the funds between hockey, wargaming, and pewter scrapping/casting. Something to save up for, though.

    I'm still on the fence. The MOssberg 151 MB has a stock-located tube mag, so that would probably help with heat issues.
     
  19. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    Can you get a 22lr hot enough to worry about barrel heat. YOUR THE MAN.....

    I bump fire my neos 20 rounds at a time and I can't get the barrel that hot.
     
  20. fireguy

    fireguy New Member

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    I've shot only tube fed .22's. I don't have anything to complain about. When I first got the Marlin 60 at 14 years old or so, I liked having such a big load of rounds to pop off. Shooting a brick of shells in a short time was common then at $5.00 a brick. I have a tube fed lever action, no problems, butt stock fed Nylon 66 no problems, and a Winnie 30-30, again, no problems.
    Both magazine fed and tube fed are reliable, just different. Have fun with whatever you get.