Can Anyone Identify This Revolver???

Discussion in 'Revolver Handguns' started by GoldDot40, Dec 7, 2010.

  1. GoldDot40

    GoldDot40 New Member

    3
    0
    0
    [​IMG][/IMG]

    [​IMG][/IMG]
    [​IMG]

    My father found this gun in the attic of an old farm house, and we have no idea about it. Any insight would be excellent. Thanks
     
  2. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

    4,991
    48
    48
    Are there any markings on the top of the barrel?
     

  3. M14sRock

    M14sRock New Member

    5,549
    0
    0
    Very cool. The U.S. Revolver Co. was one of many companies who made break top revolvers like yours.

    The brain is fuzzy, but U.S. Revolver Co was either a division of H&R, or became H&R. Sorry I can't remember more, but I have not seen a U.S. Rev in about 20 years.
     
  4. GoldDot40

    GoldDot40 New Member

    3
    0
    0
    Thanks for the replies guys! I'll try and look for any other markings when I stop by my pop's house tomorrow.
     
  5. Esteban

    Esteban New Member

    74
    0
    0
    I believe U.S. Revolvers were made by Iver Johnson, not H & R. They were NOT a government issue handgun. Someone jump in & correct me if I am wrong.
     
  6. gadrooning

    gadrooning New Member

    327
    0
    0
    You are correct. This was made by the US Revolver Co. by Iver Johnson's Arms and Cycle Works. Just type in US Revolver Co. Iver Johnson's Arms and Cycle Works on the net. You should be able to find out some more info. I do know they were made in the early 1900's.
     
  7. M14sRock

    M14sRock New Member

    5,549
    0
    0
    You are correct. My brain was a bit fuzzy.
     
  8. 30-30remchester

    30-30remchester New Member

    459
    0
    0
    There are many of this type of revolver around. They were commonly known as "bureau drawer specials". These were commonly given to the ladies of the house for protection. Most can be found in near mint condition as most were bought new, given to the lady, who shot it a few times at a can in the backyard , missed the can but scared the chickens, then loaded and spent the remainder of its life in the sock drawer.
     
  9. amoroque

    amoroque New Member

    1,229
    0
    0
    This is the perfect example of why this forum is so dang cool!

    Where else could you go and get that much info within 15 hours!

    Go FTF!
     
  10. GoldDot40

    GoldDot40 New Member

    3
    0
    0
    Seriously! I got exactly what I needed, and found the rest through google. Just needed somewhere to start from. Turns out it's not worth much, but still a cool find. Thanks for everyone's help!
     
  11. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

    12,360
    31
    48
    Dollar value may not be much, but the other value? Think ahead about twenty years and what you tell the grandkids about it.
     
  12. Esteban

    Esteban New Member

    74
    0
    0
    I would buy one to have as an additional home defense weapon.
     
  13. bamibert

    bamibert New Member

    15
    0
    0
    These were made by Iver johnson's arms & cycle works from 1910 - 1935. They were offered in small frame a large frame and in three calibers: .38 centerfire, .32 centerfire and .22 rimfire. The main serial number is on the left gripframe, in order to see it, you need to remove the grip.
     
  14. bamibert

    bamibert New Member

    15
    0
    0
    also, the usd value if everything works as it's supposed to it worth around $200,-, but when it has some minor issues it's about $130m,-
     
  15. Swiftyjuan

    Swiftyjuan New Member

    77
    0
    0
    I played with a broken one of those when I was a kid. My father told me that when he married my mom (the late 1920s) the pistol was operational, and he jokingly told her "Hey woman, I want squirrel for dinner." My mom, who was 17 at the time, picked up the pistol, walked out to the nearby trees on the farm, fired one shot, and a squirrel dropped from the top of a tree. She turned to my Dad and said "I killed it, you skin it."
    My Father told me "Son, I have always been nice to your mother since that day."
     
  16. stelliott80

    stelliott80 New Member

    14
    0
    0
    That's a neat find. I, too, came into a U.S. Revolver top-break revolver recently! It belonged to my grandpa when he was a kid (1910's-1920's-ish). It is quite worn and shows a lot of use. I have never fired it, but I think it is one cool little gun. Not worth much money, but has a lot of sentimental value.
    BTW, by way of explanation, it had no grips when I got it, so excuse my crudely sanded S&W grips. I'll give it a better set of grips one of these days.
     

    Attached Files: