Calling all LEO's

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by Wings-ofthe-Luftwaffe, Nov 30, 2009.

  1. Wings-ofthe-Luftwaffe

    Wings-ofthe-Luftwaffe New Member

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    Im wondering what it takes to become a LEO. How hard is it? What would help me out getting started? To be completely honest I wanna be swat, but I heard you can't be swat until you have 2+ years as some form of LEO. What would be the best field for me to try to enter into to get the best chance to become swat? Any info would be greatly appreciated.

    My uncle (LEO for 15+ years in many diff fields) comes back from the middle east in March (Dad (us army 21 years, CW4) is looking at deploying out to that **** hole again in Feb @_a, will make the 7th time between 2 wars hes been over there). and is currently over there helping to train and set up their local police forces. When he comes home he will be my best and biggest help im sure. Just looking for info until then.

    Anyways, sorry for the usual way-to-long post and thanks ahead of time for any helpful info you can throw my way.
     
  2. dunerunner

    dunerunner New Member

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    How old are you? What have you done with your life to prep to be a law enforcement officer or for SWAT? College? Military?

    A degree in Administration of Justice would be a good start. Experience as an MP may also be another route into law enforcement. What kind of physical conditioning do you do, regularly?

    More information is required to adequately mentor your future.
     

  3. Ubergopher

    Ubergopher New Member

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    Talkin' to SPs (Air Force MPs) and some LEOs I know military service can help, but being an SP can possibly be detrimental unless you go in willing to learn and forget a lot of what you did learn.

    There are a few differences between military justice and civilian justice and a lot of the time for the people just doing their 4-6 year enlistments won't involve a whole lot of LEO work, just security stuff.

    There are of course exceptions to every rule so don't jump my **** with examples of your second cousin's girl friend's brother who was an SP and did LEO work right out of tech school.
     
  4. Dzscubie

    Dzscubie New Member

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    OH MY GWAD, have you been looking at my military record???? :eek: I graduated from Security Police Academy in 1974 as a Law Enforcement sky cop and went off to my first base (No Hope Pope) in Fayet-nam, North Carolina. Showed up for work after a week in training and .. WOW.. my Flight Chief took one look at me and sent my A__ to the flight line where I humped C-130's for the next 2 years. They actually gave me a 3 level (entry level for you non AF guys) in Security (read Ramp Rat). I ended up getting my 5 level (journeyman level) before I ever actually pulled a Law Enforcement patrol for the first time. I even was a civilian sheriffs deputy before I went in the AF and they still sent my A__ to the flight line.
    .
     
  5. Wings-ofthe-Luftwaffe

    Wings-ofthe-Luftwaffe New Member

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    I'm actually in pretty good shape (i train part time as a mixed martial arts fighter and do tree work for a living) but i have no LEO training or experience or related degrees. Im really looking to get started without going and getting a degree or anything, just entry level standard stuff. How do I go about becoming a normal PD or Sheriff? What should I expect (academy, etc.)? What kind of income should I expect? i live in western NC if that helps at all. Just looking for any useful info.
     
  6. Dzscubie

    Dzscubie New Member

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    Hey Wings,

    Your best bet is to call the local Sheriffs Department or local PD's and find out what they require to apply for a job, then you have to find a department that is currently hiring, then you apply, interview, polygraph, background investigation, criminal check, drug test (read, hey! pee in this cup) and then pass the academy. It is all worth it in the end. And as for the SWAT thing, bide your time and get experience on the street first.... besides, SWAT is really over rated a lot of hours and hours of boredom for a few moments of stark terror, and actually working the streets is pretty exciting a lot of the time too. Remember, you have to walk before you can run.
     
  7. Wings-ofthe-Luftwaffe

    Wings-ofthe-Luftwaffe New Member

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    Oh i totally understand, just looking to find the right walking shoes ;-).
    How long is the standard academy and what is it in comparison to army BT?
     
  8. Dzscubie

    Dzscubie New Member

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    LOL, Army BT is for breaking down individual thought (they constant “why do I have to do that”) and to teach you to accept and act on orders immediately and without question (this is my opinion and only my opinion and is not meant to disparage or belittle anyone that has served, is serving, or will serve in the U.S. Army) a police academy (IMO) is designed to teach you to rely on your individual responsibility and thought and at the same time look out for your fellow officers and work as a team. There is still structure that is similar to Army training while at the same time completely different. My federal academy was 16 weeks long, but in 1974 my sheriff’s department academy was 6 weeks. You will have to ask the individual departments how long their academy’s are.
     
  9. pioneer461

    pioneer461 New Member

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    Different departments have different requirements for transfer. Basically, everyone starts out as a beat cop, working a patrol car on the night shift. That is where you learn the job.

    Someone said a college degree is a good idea and I completely agree. Some departments require a degree, but smaller ones not so much. I got mine going to school part time, working the streets and raising a family.

    There is a lot to learn before going into a specialty unit such as SWAT. You will have to demonstrate a certain level of street-smarts and the ability to make sound judgment calls. Get on the streets, build up your street creds, and you will be noticed.

    With the possible exception of LA & NYPD, most SWAT troops work regular assignments and get called out when needed. No sitting around waiting for something to happen. That only happens on TV and the movies.

    Good luck.

    [​IMG]
     
  10. cpttango30

    cpttango30 New Member

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    Just go and apply for LA county Sheriff. They are so tough they have their own tv show.
     
  11. Walley

    Walley New Member

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    As others have said first contact as many departments as you can and find out what their requirements are. Next talk to officers in those departments and get their take on what their jobs are really all about. Remember being on the street is nothing like what you see on TV. Hours upon hours of mind numbing routine and dealing with a-holes who are best described as walking adds for birth control followed by a few moments of something you might find exciting or, as someone else has already said, sheer terror.

    All jurisdictions are made up by the same kind of people you already have in your life so at times you might have to work with someone you can’t stand or have a superior who got their job by kissing *** rather than deserving it by their smarts and performance on the job. I know that fifty years have passed since I entered the academy but I can see that the job is still basically the same only quite a bit more complicated and technical.

    Education is a big asset in doing the job. I have served with quite a few officers who went to law school nights and became damn good attorneys. I myself worked my *** off and got a PhD in Psychology during the 25 years I was in law enforcement. I guess I kissed the right *** and ended up being a consultant to the Justice Department.

    Just the musings of an old man who has been there and done that.
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2009
  12. Wings-ofthe-Luftwaffe

    Wings-ofthe-Luftwaffe New Member

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    I really appreciate all the info folks. And i just wanted to clarify that i am not interested in the job to be a billy bad *** that kicks everyone's *** and play wild wild west. I am genuinely looking at this like a real career with ups and downs and perks and drawbacks etc. I am planning to go down to a few different jurisdictions and talk to each respective pd at the beginning of next week. Hopefully sometime in the near future ill be in a patrol car doing my best to save lives. Thx again.