Buying a handgun - woman perspective

Discussion in 'General Handgun Discussion' started by rav373, Jun 20, 2013.

  1. SigArmored

    SigArmored New Member

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    There are quite a few females here with a bunch of experience that I'm sure will be by in a few .Welcome to the forum and don't forget to stop by our introductions page and introduce you're self.
     

  2. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

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    If you have any specific questions, I am here to answer some for you. I am a woman and have a few guns.

    My first gun was a revolver. Revolvers are fairly easy to use and when you empty the cylinder, the gun is empty. No forgetting there might be one in the chamber. With a semi-auto, you have to drop the mag then rack the slide to make sure it's empty. Even some very experienced shooters find themselves with a loaded gun they were sure was empty.

    I felt very comfortable with a revolver as a first gun and gradually felt the need/want for a semi-auto as I became more familiar with shooting. If you know someone who is experienced, I'll bet they would like to help you choose a firearm and help you get familiar with it.
     
  3. JTJ

    JTJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You generally got some good advice at the shops. Grip is extremely important and one of the reasons I recommend getting the feel of several different brands. Most of the Glocks dont fit my hand and I am a man. I dont know how some women manage the Glocks grip. My wife went with a Ruger SR9c which has a smaller grip than the Glock. She also learned on revolvers like Winds. She does not like the double action pull of the revolver and always shot them single action (cocked the hammer). There are many good pistols out there to choose from. Shoot as many as you can by renting or a friends weapon if they are willing.
     
  4. JW357

    JW357 New Member

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    Based on the article you linked, I'm assuming you want one for home defense. I like the idea of a rather heavy revolver chambered in .357 Magnum (just in case) but keeping it loaded with some hollow point .38 Specials (for reduced recoil as well as muzzle flash). I say a heavy one because if you aren't planning in carrying it for concealed carry, the extra weight is an advantage, in my opinion, which also reduces felt recoil.

    Plus revolvers couldn't be easier to operate. Not to mention they're dang fun to shoot.
     
  5. QueenGlamis

    QueenGlamis New Member

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    I am also a girl and carry a Beretta PX4 subcompact 9MM. One thing I really like about it is it fits like a glove in my hand (I am 5'4" 130 lbs, average hand size I would say), has very controllable recoil and I have the option of using a 10, 13 or 17 round magazine. I cannot recommend enough to go to a local indoor range, rent a lane (most have a "ladies night" that is free for women) paying for an hour of gun rental (less than 7.00 usually) and trying out a bunch of different brands and calibers. Holding it in your hand at a store doesn't tell you anything about recoil, loading and reloading, ability to control the weapon etc. if you have a neutral brand-wise gun friendly person to go with you so you have safety rules down and don't want to feel silly on "how do I do this" questions all the better.

    Good luck! Shooting is so awesome! And the knowledge that you are able to confidentially defend yourself and your family if needed is priceless!
     
  6. BeyondTheBox

    BeyondTheBox New Member

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    Most quality semiautomatics have a lock back after last round feature. There's no questioning a last round. Also one should grow accustomed to counting rounds fired so they don't have to wonder.

    Just my dine
     
  7. rav373

    rav373 New Member

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    thnx for the suggestions, someone also said to start with a .22 - less recoil until you're used to it then go up in caliber. What are your thoughts?
     
  8. elfmdl

    elfmdl New Member

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    With automatics be sure that you can safely pull the slide back. My mom has a hard time finding anything larger than a .22 that she can easily operate the slide
     
  9. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    Would you use a .22lr on a 100# hog?

    If not, then why would you expect it to stop a 200# bad guy?

    Go with the largest caliber you can be proficient with.

    (If that is the .22, then so be it.)
     
  10. JW357

    JW357 New Member

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    I agree. I also think most novice shooters, regardless of age, size, or gender, can easily handle the recoil of a 9mm or a .38 Special.

    I said MOST intentionally. I don't need to hear about someone's wife's cousin's husband's brother's roommate from college who knows a guy who knows a guy who can't handle said recoil because of arthritis or something.
     
  11. DrumJunkie

    DrumJunkie New Member

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    My wife now has a K frame Smith. she keeps 38's in it most all the time. It's not a concealed gun but she doesn't' want to carry daily anyway. She loves the 357 though. with the lighter loads she is more than comfortable shooting it. And s he likes gthe idea that she can drop a full house load if she feels the need.
     
  12. therewolf

    therewolf New Member

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    My advice would be get something you feel

    comfortable shooting at the range. There

    are many very nice 22LR revolvers out there.

    A few hold nine shots.

    If you feel you can handle something stronger, go for it.
     
  13. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    Personally im not a fane of revolvers for self defense regardless of gender. Fine motor skills are needed to operate the cylinder and loading of ammo. Semi auto is all gross motor skill.

    First thing to go out the window under the effects of adrenaline are fine motor skills.
     
  14. Anna_Purna

    Anna_Purna New Member

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    I personally think revolvers are much easier to learn on than semi autos. Not alot of extra buttons to have to deal with to fully know and work it. Most my friends can't even work the slide, as some here have suggested you make sure you can handle before you buy it.
    A 22 revolver is a great gun to start out with and learn safety, marksmanship, trigger finger, etc. Once you graduate from that, and want more power, go for it then. If you get something that will scare you away fron just the recoil or strenght to work the slide, you will NEVER be good with a handgun, and will more likely get yourself killed from not knowing it, or the bad guy taking it away and using it on you.

    And a 22 is great even for down the road when you are into bigger guns. They keep your marksman skills going, when other ammo is costly. :D
     
  15. winds-of-change

    winds-of-change The Balota's Staff Member

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    IF it's loaded and ready to go, you won't be needing those fine motor skills in a self defense situation. Does anyone carry a semi-auto and stop to load it before needing it? Nope. Same with a revolver.
     
  16. danf_fl

    danf_fl Retired Supporter

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    I won't tell Jerry you said that! :)
    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lLk1v5bSFPw"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lLk1v5bSFPw[/ame]
     
  17. JW357

    JW357 New Member

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    I agree, you will only need fine motor skills in the event of a reload. Become a good shot and you prolly won't even need to do that in a SD/HD situation. Most people think gun battles are these long drawn out things where dozens of rounds are being shot. Maybe for gangbangers. Statistically most SD situations involving a firearm end before a shot is fired. If lead does have to be exchanged, most of the time it's over in a small few shots.

    That's not justification for putting magazine limits in place, of course.

    Personally I think revolvers are easier to clean and "field strip" than semis, despite having 6 chambers to clean individually. That being said, I think disassembling a semi requires more fine motor skills. So, as such, I think on a normal day a revolver is much easier to operate.
     
  18. robertmodero

    robertmodero New Member

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    I would like to also point out that no matter what gun you are buying you should always try it out first before buying it. That is because of the few reasons. First, women have generally smaller hands than men. Also, they possess less strength in their fingers to pull the trigger. Last but not least, their wardrobe can be challenging to carry a gun. We actually wrote about it here for anyone interested: http://nationalcarryacademy.com/woman-issues/ Take a look and let me know what are your thoughts. Would definitely appreciate some feedback.
    - Robert Modero
     
  19. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    He is a freak of nature and not human.

    The issue i have with revolvers is a carry gun is usually tucked under clothing or in the case of a lot of women in a purse. Those two places are worse than dragging it through sand and muck. It doesnt take much lint to lock up a revolver.

    Autos are much more reliable under carry conditions.

    The biggest issue in modern times is capacity. 20 or 30 years ago you would face maybe one aggressor. Now its normally two or three or more and most revolvers designed for ccw are 5 shot models.

    Makes this very poignant:

    [ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a1m9lEvJ3M8&app=desktop[/ame]

    While we arent assasins dropping through ceilings, the point remains, what are you going to do?? Laugh the last goblin to death??

    When it comes to reloads unless you practice for 40 years and go about your day with your hands hovering over your gun and race rig like miculek in a competition waiting for a ding, a revolver puts you at a big disadvantage if facing multiple attackers.

    Whatifing is fun but if you got a revolver at least you have a gun and that is the cardinal rule of self defense.