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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
when referring to a reloading manuals listing of powders for a specific bullet, does that specific brand of bullet absolutely need to be used or can one substitute a similar bullet, of the same weight in grains, and of the same type, but by a different manufacturer, or does it have to be used verbatim.

so if the manual lists the bullet as a Sierra HPBT #2200 168 gr. bullet, that is absolutely the only bullet to be used with the listed powder loads, no substitutions whatsoever!!

matching available bullets and available powders right now is quite the puzzle.

(I'm referencing Lymans 49th edition, the only one I have available to me at the time, I have Speers 14th somewhere in storage)
 

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This is the results of their testing of their products only. They can not publish and approve data for products they have not tested. Different bullets being the same weight can and do have different pressure ratios. This can be due to cores or bearing surface jacket alloy etc. It is easy to just use tested reloading results.:)
 

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while there is a chance that different bullets from companies may be slightly different. i have been mix matching for a few years now with no problem. just start light and work your way up. for instance my speer manual is not using hornady bullets, but for my223, 9mm, and 40 i have not had any problems. its more about bullet weight and type i think than the company.
 

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Get the Hodgen manual. they have their data by bullet weight only, no specific brand or type. I use it for 99% of my referace.:)
 

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Get the Hodgen manual. they have their data by bullet weight only, no specific brand or type. I use it for 99% of my referace.:)
+1 on the Hodgdon manual.
 

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I substitute different bullet types as long as the weight is the same. I always start a little light just to be careful.
 

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see below hehe
 

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Different bullets of the same weight from different makers can have different bearing surface. This will change the pressures. You should work up a load with a very specific set of components. Change anything, Start over.

WTS most of my loads are about 2 grains under max to begin with. I mix and match bullets w/o much worry. I have a built in margin by loading on the light side.
 

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I shoot several caliber's that published load data is rare to find for many bullets. You just have to start with low charges,and work your loads up.Then always look for pressure signs on the cases/primers to tell you when your pushing things above the limits for that bullet.
Keep a good data log,and write down what is going on with your loads.

What works good in one gun,might be way overboard in another. Like Robo said,most accurate loads are far from being the maximum powder charge in most guns.
 

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When answering a question like the OP ask I use caution. He did not post the type of action or bore condition and dimension or chamber condition etc. His level of knowledge may indicate he should use a tested load.:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
thanks for all the input guys:cool:.

I will be starting out low and slow. I most definitely respect the laws of physics and I tend to rush into things of this nature like molasses. I just wanted to be sure I have some options down the road if I buy a powder or bullet type that is available now, since most of the more common ones currently are not.
 
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