Bullet type matter as long as same weight?

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by redscho, Jul 13, 2012.

  1. redscho

    redscho New Member

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    When reloading pistol ammuntion does it matter the type of bullet as long as they are the same weight. Example, Can I use the same loading data for a 125 gr Lead Round Nose as I can for a 125 gr Full Metal Jacket? I know that loading lead one should stay under 1000 fps.
     
  2. mountainman13

    mountainman13 New Member

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    Don't you have a reloading handbook?
     

  3. jpattersonnh

    jpattersonnh Active Member

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    1000fps is a rule of thumb, but not always correct. To cycle my 10mm w/ 175 or 180gr cast lead I am well over 1000fps. You did not state if it was for a semi or revolver. I use W231 for cast lead in most pistol cartridges. The burn rate is key in semi auto's, Revolvers being more forgiving Unique work well also.
     
  4. robocop10mm

    robocop10mm Lifetime Supporting Member Lifetime Supporter

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    You cannot use Jacketed bullet data for lead bullets. Lead is slicker and will shoot faster for a given load than a jacketed bullet.
    Lead round nose from where? My 125 gr hard cast lead round nose is routinely shot at 1150 fps and I have no problems.
     
  5. grandpabear

    grandpabear New Member

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    Same weight? How about length. If you have 2 bullets the same weight but different lengths I would think that ocl would come in to play.
     
  6. Rick1967

    Rick1967 Well-Known Member

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    If I am loading lead and the books dont have a lead load for the wieght I am using I will use the starting load for a full metal jacket bullet. I do not use max for anything but what is listed.
     
  7. redscho

    redscho New Member

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    Yes, Hornady and Lyman, plus a fair amount of hand-load data I have found on the Internet from powder manufactures. Inconsistencies in the data available from these is why I asked the question in the first place.
     
  8. redscho

    redscho New Member

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    I load for both semi autos and revolvers. .380, 38 spl, 9 mm and 45 acp. Thanks for your input on this, every little bit helps.:D
     
  9. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    Redsho, check out Lee's Modern Reloading manual. they list a lot of specific lead bullet loads for the pistol calibers.
     
  10. willfully armed

    willfully armed New Member

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    Pushing lead too fast results in shearing. Lead will build up in the rifling, destroying accuracy and possibly causing over pressure.

    But slicker is kind of right;)
     
  11. stick_man

    stick_man New Member

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    If your calibers are capable of velocities greater than 1000 fps and you are limiting your cast loads to 1000, you are missing out on a whole lot of great shooting. The calibers you listed above are all primarily sub-1000fps calibers with the exception of the 9mm. If the boolit fits the barrel well (.001-.002 over groove diameter), you can take a fairly soft lead boolit up to 1400+ fps without leading and without a gas check (if you are within pressure limitations).

    Different styles of bullets will have different seating depth requirements. So, style of bullet MAY make a difference when loading.
     
  12. Axxe55

    Axxe55 The Apocalypse Is Coming.....

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    also if pushed too fast with a fast burning powder without a gas check can cause the base to melt and deform, possibly ruining accuracy.
     
  13. Overkill0084

    Overkill0084 Active Member

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    You can use low end jacketed data with cast. But as in all things reloading, you need to use caution. Cast & jacketed data tend to overlap all other things being equal. Stay away from heavier loads if you're just "Guesstimating."
    Another option I've used on occasion is to use the "next size up" cast data. For instance, if you know that 3.5 gr to 5.5 gr of XYZ powder is safe with a 180 gr cast bullet, then you can be pretty comfortable in knowing that your 170 gr bullet should be safe within those limits. You have now at least got a sensible starting point from which to work. Though in this example, I'd probably start with say, 3.8 gr, just to avoid being too light.

    If you like to mess with cast bullets a lot, hunt down a copy of the Lyman Cast Bullet handbook 4th edition. It's worth every cent.
    As mentioned previously, the Lee Modern Reloading 2nd Edition is a helpful source. It's a compilation of data from other sources, so detail is a bit thin and may also be a bit dated, so I prefer to cross reference data from other sources as much as possible. But it's rare that you can't find something in it for what you're loading. It's also cheap.