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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
be VERY careful with commercial reloads/reman ammo VOIDS most factory warranties. Known to KB Glocks
I did not know that, thanks for the tip. What kind of negative effects arise from reloaded ammo? What does KB mean?


Edit:Found the info, they go Kaboom! Well I suppose I will cancel the order.

Does this mean that I should never shoot remanned ammo? I was considering reloading myself at some point.
 

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IF the ammo is truely commercial remanufactured by a commercial loader with product liability insurance, OK.

Companies like Black Hills are great ! Their 223 reman outshoots most factory
as the brass is cleaned, sorted, trimmed and reloaded like new ammo.
BUT shooting reloads or remanufactured ammo Voids gun warranties like Glock.
.............and they can tell IF damage is done by reloads as they will want the brass from any round that caused a failure.

IF you reload ammo and stay within recommended load specs, you should be OK....but do assume liability for damage to your firearm.

New commercial ammo is usually loaded to SAAMI specs for safety. That is why is complies with firearms manyfacturers warranty statements.

I would NEVER buy some Bubbas reloads at a gun show as you have NO idea what the load is.:cool:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
IF the ammo is truely commercial remanufactured by a commercial loader with product liability insurance, OK.

Companies like Black Hills are great ! Their 223 reman outshoots most factory
as the brass is cleaned, sorted, trimmed and reloaded like new ammo.
BUT shooting reloads or remanufactured ammo Voids gun warranties like Glock.
.............and they can tell IF damage is done by reloads as they will want the brass from any round that caused a failure.

IF you reload ammo and stay within recommended load specs, you should be OK....but do assume liability for damage to your firearm.

New commercial ammo is usually loaded to SAAMI specs for safety. That is why is complies with firearms manyfacturers warranty statements.

I would NEVER buy some Bubbas reloads at a gun show as you have NO idea what the load is.:cool:


Again, thanks you for the tips. I appreciate them. I went ahead and canceled the order. I am not sure if they have liability insurance or not. I will stick with new ammo until I have enough brass to reload them myself.
 

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Well it kind of sounds like Dguns is anti-reloaded ammo. Have you had a bad batch or what? Let us know where your comming from.

First off yes reloaded ammo voids your warranty. Next if your shooting a Glock I wouldn't reload or shoot it for any reason. Their chambers are not fully suported. That means the case is not tight in the chamber and have more chance to let the pressures out.

I myself have been reloading for myself and a few friends for over 12yrs. I started because it was cheaper but then found out how much better most of the ammo shoots. In the 12 yrs I have been reloading the only problems I have ever had was a few primers that didn't go off. When I start reloading a caliber I check out the powders available for that caliber and find one that performs well and almost fills the case. That way there is no chance of a double charge. Same with both pistol and rifle.

HSM is another place that does a lot of bulk reloading. They are the ones that supply Cabela's with their bulk ammo.
Good luck. Jovan
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
First off yes reloaded ammo voids your warranty. Next if your shooting a Glock I wouldn't reload or shoot it for any reason. Their chambers are not fully suported. That means the case is not tight in the chamber and have more chance to let the pressures out.


I am a little confused? You do not prefer to shoot Glocks period?? Or not with reloaded ammo?
 

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1. IF you want to shoot reloads in ANY Glock..get a replacement barrel that has been properly heat treated and you will have NO problems. All the after-market barrels except Glock are good.

2. HSM is JUNK ! period. I don't care if Cabellas is DUMB enough to sell it.

In Colorado, they just lost ALL their LE from Blowing up a BRAND NEW Colt M-4 223 in one PD and an entire County Contract from 45acp and 223 that either would not chamber or function reliably in 45acps from Colt 1911 's to Les Baer 1911's. They have little quality control. They could not get thru a mag of HSM 223 without a jam.

They HAVE been around for years and I have sold hundereds of thousands of
rounds of their ammo in the past 25+ years in the business. NOT now...is it not safe to shoot. We examined many rounds from a Sheriff's Department and the velocity varied over 100FPS round to round and the OAL length varied far too much.:eek:
 

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Not only does Glock advise against using reloads, they also tell you not to shoot unjacketed lead loads. This is because the polyagonal rifling in their barrels gets leaded up rather quickly and that raises pressures above safe limits, which can cause a case-head blowout (aka Kaboom)
I shoot lead reloads all the time in my G27, but I use a KKM Precision aftermarket barrel. It has conventional rifling and a much tighter chamber which fully supports the case head. I only use the stock barrel for my carry loads which are Factory Jacketed.
 

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Reloaded Ammunition

Police agencies use reloaded ammunition all the time. Watch for ammunition reloaded to Sporting Arms Ammunition Manufacturers Institute (SAAMI) standards. Lightly loaded target rounds and ammunition loaded to the same velocities as commercial ammunition can be generally regarded as safe.

As an experienced reloader, I can say that 9mm handguns are especially problematic with high powered reloads. Under 125 grain bullets, the 9 x 19mm cartridge can be loaded up close to .357 Magnum velocities. The problem is that 9mm bore diameters vary from .350" to .370". High powered loads developed in a larger bore are unsafe in smaller bore. I cracked the grips on a S&W Model 39 learning this lesson.
 

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i have found www.ammonow.com to be useful in locating an online store with good prices...

i always have to check each store to make sure they will sell to a chicago addressed FOID...kind of lame- some do and some dont, so i often miss out on some good sale prices.:mad:

i have found MidwayUSA usually has good prices...

www.ammunitiontogo.com. is great -recently scored a bunch of 9mm and .223 for about $0.28 and $0.39 a rnd with S&H which is pretty good.
 

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First off yes reloaded ammo voids your warranty. Next if your shooting a Glock I wouldn't reload or shoot it for any reason. Their chambers are not fully supported. That means the case is not tight in the chamber and have more chance to let the pressures out.
1. <start calm soft voice> All firearms manufacturers' warranties state that the warranty is voided if a person uses re-loaded ammo. That covers the company from any liability should the user stuff a super hot round into the chamber. IMHO, a person would have to be nuts to do so, with or without a warranty restriction. There are safe ways to work up loads, and smart people go that route, as I am sure gunnut does.

2. The Gen 1 Glock .40 S&W was the only model I am aware of that had support problems. Those issues have been fixed to the extent that they caused problems. I know this because I reload for my Gen 3 Glock 23. If you mic the case of a .40 S&W that has been fired by a Gen 3 Glock, you can measure a very few thousandths of bulge near the case head. In all instances where this has occurred with ammo I loaded/shot (or hot factory ammo that I then re-loaded), the cases have re-sized without problems and have continued to be re-loadable. No splits, no work hardening. As stated elsewhere, I am not a professional re-loader or attorney. All I know is what has worked for me. <end calm soft voice>
 

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I have ordered from http://georgia-arms.com with good luck. I have a full case of .40 S&W and a half case of match grade .223 that have both been flawless so far. I will likely order from them again when they get .38 components back in stock.
 

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I have been reloading 40 S&W for my Glock 23 for over 10 years with the original barrel. Load it correctly, inspect the brass closely and use the proper equipment to reload the rounds and follow the Powder MFG specs and you won't have any problems.

Now as far as Re-Manufactures Ammo, I have tried some, with no problems and I have a friend that for years have used it exclusively with no problems.

Next you should ask - Have I ever blown up a weapon because of improper reloading - YES and it did cost me alot of money to get it fixed.
 

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For the uninitiated, the "support issue" that everyone is talking about is this. When a Browning style gun is locked and ready for firing, there is a small portion of the case wall that is not enclosed by the barrel. You can see this by removing the slide and barrel, inserting an empty or fired case into the chamber then manually moving the barrel to the locked position. When you look up the feed ramp, you can see part of the cartridge case exposed.

In the Colt 1911, the feed ramp was very conservative. Later manufacturers designed considerably larger feed ramps for their guns. Some believe that cases should be complete enclosed when firing. Others are more accepting of larger feed ramps.

From my experience, this "support issue" is even a form of safety feature. In the event of a barrel blockage or an overloaded cartridge, the case will blow out down the feed ramp. It will crack the grips on the gun and sting your hand but you are likely to have all your appendages & eyes. Depending in the cause, you will have to replace the grips and maybe a magazine. Far better than having to replace barrel and slide.

Firearms warranties are one of those equivocal issues. Firearms manufacturers will immediately fix safety issues, functional issues under duress but lots of luck trying to collect if your new gun blows to pieces with the first box of factory ammunition. The gun manufacturerer will blame you and the ammunition. The ammunition manufacturer will, of course, blame you and the gun manufacturer. Absent major injuries which would support a a civil suit, you're probably better off to find out what happened, replace the gun and go on.
 
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