Buffalo Bore or Corbon Hardcast .357 Mag For Bear

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by CA357, Dec 9, 2012.

  1. Corbon 200gr. Hardcast Vel: 1150 FPS, Energy: 587 Ft/Lbs

    3 vote(s)
    37.5%
  2. Buffalo Bore 180gr. Hardcast Velocity: 1400 FPS.

    5 vote(s)
    62.5%
  1. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    I'd rather have a .44 Magnum, but a .357 Magnum is what I have. I'd like your opinion on which of these two choices would work best for bear and a woods load in general. However, bear is my biggest concern.

    Please tell me why you picked what you picked. Thanks.

    These seem to be my best and possibly only choices for factory ammunition:

    1. Corbon 200gr. Hardcast
    Barrel length: 6"
    Velocity: 1150 FPS
    Energy: 587ft/lbs.

    2. Buffalo Bore 180gr. Hardcast
    Barrel length 5"
    Velocity: 1398 FPC
    Energy: not stated

    Heavier and slower or lighter and faster?

    I'll be carrying these as my woods load in a 6" Ruger Security Six.
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2012
  2. astroman

    astroman Supporting Member Supporter

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    I would think heavier and slower. Doesn't that equate to more punch and therefore more damage?
     

  3. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    I think so, but I'm not sure.
     
  4. astroman

    astroman Supporting Member Supporter

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    I'm sure orangello will approve of any bullet that takes down a bear...he loves them :)
     
  5. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    People who shoot bears with a .357 end up as little piles of brown on moss covered rocks. The rule for handguns and any big game is .40- 200 -1,000 minimum. That is a .40 caliber firing a 200 gr. bullet at 1,000 fps as a minimum load. ;)
     
  6. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    Dammit! I'm trying to avoid selling the .357 to buy a .44, but I may have to.
     
  7. astroman

    astroman Supporting Member Supporter

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    Are we talking 800 lb grizzly or 300 lb black bear? Also is this self defense or hunting?
     
  8. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    Black bears, but they can be large. No grizzly's here since the 1930's.
     
  9. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    A bear that is Pi$$ Off does not know what color he is? Always prepare for the largest attack and be thankful when it is a small one. :)
     
  10. willfully armed

    willfully armed New Member

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    The Buffalo bore is 783#.

    No question.
     
  11. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    Oh yeah, we have cougars too. :eek:
     
  12. bluez

    bluez Well-Known Member

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    PPL say you can use a .357 Mag in a pinch for bear if its not a grizzly.
    interactions.

    a really hot .357 can have as much energy as a low end 44 Mag.
    The low end 44 mag are 700 lb ft and up.
    a hotter .357 can easily to 700 even w/o sponeding lots of money.

    The caliber only matters in the sense that the avg range of loads usually sold in it.

    There are plenty of .41 loads that put less energy on target than a hot .357 load.

    My GP100's have handled .357 east european factory loads that have as much energy as the avg .41 or a low end .44 Mag.

    Compare the below:

    This .357 Load shoots 688 ftlb! 158 gr at 1400 fps (!) , yes thats the 158 gr flying at the speed the 125 gr .357s usually do.(!)
    http://www.cheaperthandirt.com/product/61892

    This .41 Mag shoots a bit less energy that the .357 above, its 210 gr at 1200 fps so .41 Mag would not an upgrade with this basic ammo
    http://www.cheaperthandirt.com/product/AMM-491

    This 44 Mag is less than 10 % more energy than the high end .357 I linked above:
    http://www.cheaperthandirt.com/product/7-AR44MG3


    Did I cherry pick a little bit?
    Yes, but I hope it illustrated ,my point.

    On this note I run GP100's generally considered the strongest frame and top strap .357 revolver currently sold in quantity.

    Others may not have the freedom to run such hot loads of .357 thru their revolvers..but for a self defense role I think its ok since your not contantly shooting.

    For a hunting role a 44 Mag would be better but even w/ 44 Mag I would examine the loads because whats the point of buying a 44 mag and then running a load thats basically the same energy on target as a hot .357?

    PS: I voted Buffalo bore.. its more than one sixth faster, but only 5 % lighter than your other choice. So it will have more energy on target .
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2012
  13. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    It's a 6" Ruger Security Six and it should handle any loads the GP100 can.
     
  14. bluez

    bluez Well-Known Member

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    I own both.
    The GP100 is stronger (it's based on a .41 Mag frame) BUT the Security Six are not known for problems.

    I would also feel fairly safe shooting very hot .357 Mag loads in my Security Six
    But if I were to shoot them a LOT, I would prefer a GP100.

    PS : Now you made me curious I gotta buy myself these super hot loads you listed your choice of loads definetly put more energy on target than most 44 Mags loads do.
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2012
  15. DodgerBlue

    DodgerBlue New Member

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    I love Buffalo Bore. Best ammo imo.
     
  16. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    I can always tell shooters who rely on loading manuals and those that use firearms. This is not about debating this is about surviving a bear attack. The larger diameter of the bullet cuts a larger wound channel causing more tissue damage. The .44 Mag. or a heavy juiced .45 Colt slaming 240 grs. or up to 300 grs bullets is a good choice. It is most important to carry the arm in a strong leather rig with the holstered gun high and near center of the chest. A gun lashed on the side like Matt Dillion style will be useless. The handgun is the last resort you will likely lose your rifle in the first hit. You will need a rig that can stand the pounding you are going to get. The handgun needs to be where you can get to it in a clinch. Your shooting if you are still alive will be point blank.:eek:
     
  17. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    We live on almost four acres in the woods surrounded by more woods. We're not completely isolated, just really, really private. I wasn't planning on carrying a long arm when I take a walk. Otherwise, it's hunting, not hiking. ;)
     
  18. willfully armed

    willfully armed New Member

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    I love assumation construed from generalization.
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2012
  19. nitestalker

    nitestalker New Member

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    Well it could be the bears you deal with in Kansas City are much smaller than the ones here in the Rocky Mtns. I have only seen KCMO from 30,000 feet so I can not say what your bears are like.:rolleyes:
     
  20. John_Deer

    John_Deer New Member

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    I shot a 3/8" spinning target that I have shot 100's of times with 158 gr JSP ammo once with a 200 grain cast bullet. After that shot I was hauling my target up to the shop to weld up the hole in it. I wouldn't want to take on any animal that will try to turn me into a bloody pulp with any handgun.

    We all have watched those TV shows were Mr Super Hunter has killed a large bear or moose with a handgun or bow. There is a guide just out of camera range with an adequate rifle. Don't go out alone to piss in any bear's cornflakes with just a handgun. Make sure you have a back up shooter with a rifle.