Break in period

Discussion in '1911 Forum' started by cmahan, Mar 4, 2012.

  1. cmahan

    cmahan New Member

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    Need advice, is it necessary to break in a new $1200 kimber, I think for that price you should be able to take it home and clean and lube it and start to carry it without breaking it in, what are your thoughts on it
     
  2. UrbanNinja

    UrbanNinja New Member

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    My personal opinion is that you should do a break in period on EVERYTHING you buy new. Its just like buying a new car... yes, you go out and use it the same day you buy it but, you still have a break in period. I.E: you have to change the oil every 500 miles instead of every 3000. It needs to go in every so many miles for a "check up". Nothing ever works properly until it "wears" itself in.
     

  3. rugerjazzkohai

    rugerjazzkohai New Member

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    Any firearm that I plan to defend myself and others need to prove functional to me at least 500 times without failure before I trust it with my life. Even my Kimber had to earn it's right to be carried. I would hate to find out my firearm is not 100% when I need it the most.
     
  4. limbkiller

    limbkiller New Member

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    Any new gun should run with anything fed it. If it doesn't send it back to be fixed period!!!
     
  5. JD1969

    JD1969 New Member

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    I disagree. A gun, full metal ones in particular are just like any other machine. The parts need to bed into each other and the only thing that will do that is use. Now if I bought a new 1911 and it would not feed or eject at all, I would consider sending it back. 1911's ,and the high end ones in particular, with tight tolerances need a few hundred rounds to get everything moving and seated right, it's just part the game with them.
     
  6. Bear304inc

    Bear304inc New Member

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    Read Cane's post on this topic, very informative. take the rest with thick skin, someone clearly p'd him off that day, but its the best description I've seen.
     
  7. rifleshooter474

    rifleshooter474 New Member

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    I have owned three Kimbers a 5" 3" 4" all needed around 500 to 800 rounds fired to get to not have failures. I just don't feel Kimber is watching their quality enough and are pushing their production over quality.:rolleyes:
     
  8. MrWray

    MrWray New Member

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    im not gonna waste my money on a gun that "requires" a 500-1000 round break in period, especially a gun that cost 1k+. I have a High Standard 1911A1, i paid $500 for and ive put over 1,300rds through it with "Z E R O" malfunctions. I have used winchester whitebox FMJ, federal hydroshok,remington golden sabre,Hornady TAP, Hornady custom, and gold dots...it eats them up and asks for seconds. Kimber can keep their guns, ill keep my $500 High Standard
     
  9. HOSSFLY

    HOSSFLY New Member

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    You break in a "bride" :rolleyes:
    You shoot a gun ;)
     
  10. MrWray

    MrWray New Member

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    I want to add.... I know that a gun performs better after it stretches its legs a little, but if you add up 500 rounds of ammo,say even 800. Thats a small chunk of change that you are spending just to get it to "proper working condition" that it should already have. Its just to big of a gamble that im not willing to take. Malfunctions create frustration, frustration leads to added stress, which in return makes you not trusting or confident in your gun. Once a gun has malfunctions, the question will always be in the back of your mind "when is it gonna jam again? And what if it jams whenever my life is on the line?"
     
  11. spittinfire

    spittinfire New Member Supporter

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    Send it to me, along with 1000 rounds of ammo and I'll do it for you.
     
  12. kytowboater

    kytowboater Active Member

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    If you are busy, I will gladly help you out with that.....
     
  13. Byron0022

    Byron0022 New Member

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    Yep, when your *** is on the line that's the last thing you need going through your head.
     
  14. REDTAIL

    REDTAIL Member

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    Now let me see if I read this right,? You want to carry a gun for SD without firing a few hundred rounds through it,? Just because you paid big bucks for it.? Ever hear of Murphy's Law.?Good luck to you if you ever need that gun to save your life on.?
     
  15. MrWray

    MrWray New Member

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    Ya Murphy, i hate that effin guy!! The son of a b!tch follows me around everywhere. I keep telling him to leave me the hell alone, but he keeps showing up!
     
  16. cmahan

    cmahan New Member

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    Ok ok yeah I get it guys, I'm new to 1911s, I now know they need a few 100 rounds thru them to be dependable lol
     
  17. BenLuby

    BenLuby New Member

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    It's not just that. It's also the issue that you're buying the firearm as a primary self defense tool. You're talking about a situation which is high stress, high panic, with your heart rate rolling well above the recommended speed limit, and you have absolutely NO practice with the firearm?
    If you fully intend to carry for SD, you MUST see to it that you have muscle memory drilled in your mind and muscles so that when you go to draw in a life or death situation, your body does what is right, rather than you dropping it, getting it stuck in the holster, shooting an innocent bystander or any other number of bad situations.
    Not to sound like a smartazz, but you're talking about carrying a tool. A sidearm is, at it's base, a hunk of polymer/metal that does absolutely nothing without your interaction. It is the inanimate object that YOU have to be skilled with.
    It is NOT a pocket ninja that magically jumps off your hip and beats the hell out of whoever is trying to attack you.
     
  18. gollygee

    gollygee New Member

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    Every mechanical device should be checked out to be sure it functions properly & especially pistols. I don't know that this means a specific number of rounds & I wonder about Kimber's thing about requiring 500 rounds. I can't remember the maker, but I read where one of the high end manufacturers tells their customers to not clean or lube their pistols until 500 rounds, because they come with a special lube for break-in. If I spend that kinda money for a hand fitted pistol, I'll follow their instructions. But, when I had about 250 rounds through my Kimber, I deemed it fit to carry.
     
  19. billt

    billt New Member

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    I wouldn't call it needing a "break in" as much as I would call it requiring an extended test fire to assure confidence in reliability. This only if you intend to use the weapon in any type of self defense posture. If it's just a range or fun gun, don't worry about it.