Break-in a rifle

Discussion in 'General Rifle Discussion' started by Sibil, Oct 15, 2012.

  1. Sibil

    Sibil New Member

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    My gunsmith recomend me to break-in my new and first rifle. That's the first time I heard about break-in a gun(I have a glock and a ruger 10/22). He told me to first shoot the rifle and then cleaning it with a cleaning patch with solvent two times and then two times more with a dry cleaning patch. He then told me to do this process 20 times. Then the same process with 5 shoot for 4 times (20 in total).
    Is this process very common with rifle or with common guns? I never did it with my ruger or the pistol glock.
     
  2. Gatoragn

    Gatoragn Active Member

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    I never have done as described. I take any gun that is new to me, drag a bore snake through the barrel, make sure the internals and metal to metal parts are clean and oiled and let 'r rip tater chip.

    I asked a 'smith one time about that shoot once, clean twice, etc. on my AR15 and the 'smith said it was not necessary. Give the gun a normal cleaning and oiling hit the range.

    I suppose if I was trying to put 3 bullets in the same hole at 500 yards it might be something to consider, but that is not my cup of tea.
     

  3. purehavoc

    purehavoc New Member

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    DO a search . One of the best match grade barrel makers thats no longer with us says if you have the money to waste gutting the inside of a barrel you have more money than smarts . He stated that barrel makers say to do this to get you to buy a new barrel sooner , it causes premature wear on the grooves . Do what you want but I run a patch thru it to clean the barrel when new and roll with it . He also states that nylon brushes cause more wear than brass brushes if you do go that crazy route .
     
  4. ChicagoJoe

    ChicagoJoe New Member

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    That break in procedure is close to the one called for in the Weatherby Vanguard owner's manual.
     
  5. tCan

    tCan Active Member

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    What is the premise here? I mean, what do you hope to avoid or accomplish by cleaning it a million times over just shooting it? It makes no sense. Can someone explain the thought process?
     
  6. Cheeseman

    Cheeseman New Member

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    HUH? Somebody is strokin' somebody else here methinks
     
  7. gunnut07

    gunnut07 New Member

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    Breaking in a barrel is pure utter BS. It is just there to make you shoot more and wear out your barrel. It will not make a factory barrel any more accurate, and if a custom barrel maker says to do it well then they are just not doing their job right and you shouldn't be buying their barrels.
     
  8. TCH2FLY

    TCH2FLY New Member

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    It depends on the person making the argument but interestingly even gun and barrel makers don't agree.
    There is a hypothesis that cleaning between each round increases the contact with the barrel and smooths the surface more effectively.
    If you want a shiny bore so you can take pictures of it to post on the Internet I would highly recommend the procedure.
     
  9. chloeshooter

    chloeshooter New Member

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    I don't understand the metallurgical science behind breaking in a barrel. Unless the manufacturer stinks, the barrel should be polished, etc before it leaves the factory. If there are burrs, defects and so on, do you really want to run even 1 bullet through it? Not me! What are we talking about, seasoning a cast iron Dutch oven? Lol

    This sounds like gun accessories industries' version of the "drink red wine for health benefits" lie that was found out to be invented by a wine marketer, not the medical industry. Clean and maintain rifles routinely. 'Nuff said
     
  10. ChicagoJoe

    ChicagoJoe New Member

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    I don't know what to believe. My factory manual and guys at the local range claim that you have to break in the barrel to get the best accuracy. Guys on this forum and some shooting journalists (Dave Petzel) say the break in requirement is nonsense.
     
  11. ChicagoJoe

    ChicagoJoe New Member

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    Next shooting urban legend: cryo-treating your barrel will tighten your groups and keep your barrel from shifting as it heats up. True or false?
     
  12. The_Kid

    The_Kid New Member

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    Still butthurt from me schooling you on this issue... Good!
     
  13. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    I just built a precision ar15 with a barrel from krieger. Their ritual was 1 shot clean five times then 3 shots clean then 5 shots clean. And done. They state its not to do anything rifling wise but to smooth out the reamer burrs so the metal all lays flat without gunk building up.

    They state that if you do this on their barrels it makes cleaning easier and helps hold accuracy longer without as much gunk building up.

    I must say after following their ritual my krieger takes no time to clean. Much easier.

    Whatever gun you have only run brushes patches etc one way. From breach to muzzle. Never scrub a barrel like your washing a bottle. Scrubbing back and forth is what ruins barrels. Just like sharpening a knife. You dont scrape a knife back and forth down a stone.
     
  14. Gonzilla

    Gonzilla Active Member

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    All barrels are not created equal and all do not come from the factory smooth & polished, free from *^%# defects. See mini -14 section on lapping the barrel or loading special bullets to accomplish the same thing but you shoot your barrel smooth.

    The concept is kinda old. Has anyone ever had an average shooting gun and it's this way for years - then it starts to shoot GREAT. You smoothed it out the old fashioned way - you shot it ! :D.

    If your barrel IS already perfect - congrats - now keep it that way.

    Competition shooters can be superstitious folk and I will leave it to the shooter to decide which "apply" to them & their routine. But if you spent the extra $$$ on a good barrel, why not spend the extra minute to run a snake down the barrel ? (Counts as a cleaning in my book)
     
  15. Dan308

    Dan308 New Member

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    here's what I do for all my new gun/barrels. First use Hoppes #9 solvent with a Bronze brush 4 or 5 passes will do. Then a jag and a patch until clean. Next use a tight bore mop with JB Bore Paste 500 strokes. That's 250 in and 250 out. Clean up after with 1 dry patch. Hasn't failed me yet.
     
  16. chloeshooter

    chloeshooter New Member

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    I really wonder, at the end of the day, what difference it makes? Many rifles today are sub MOA "out of the box". I know plenty of shooters who agree, the "breaking in" thing is a bunch of hogwash - never ever did it and are satisfied with the results they attained. I won't bet the farm that it doesn't make a difference, but I strongly suspect that it does not.

    You want great accuracy? Get a decent scope, know how to work it, and practice practice practice - give your barrel a good cleaning after every range trip. OR - swab your rifle 500 times if it makes you feel better. You'll be too tired to shoot afterwards, but hey lol
     
  17. Old_Crow

    Old_Crow New Member

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    Cosomoline or any metal preservative contains petroleum distillates. When you burn oil on steel it leaves carbon deposits in the pores of the metal. If you burn enough oil in the barrel of a rifle the carbon deposits will effect the accuracy of the rifle. So the gunsmith is on the right track...what he is prescribing might be overkill but it has merit. You should never oil the barrel of a rifle unless you plan to store it.
     
  18. tCan

    tCan Active Member

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    IDK, Rem Oil seems like fairly volatile stuff. It's gone pretty quick. Or it seems that way. I agree you don't want grease in the bore, but some light oil cant hurt can it?
     
  19. Old_Crow

    Old_Crow New Member

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    Have you ever seen burnt valve in an older V8 engine? The O-rings that seal the valve go bad. A small amount of oil drips down on the valve each time you shut off the engine. In short order carbon builds up on the valve until the valve fails to operate properly and the engine starts missing.

    If you oil your barrel every time you come home from the range carbon builds up in your barrel in just the same fashion. The carbon build up isn't as fast because gun oil is much lighter than motor oil, but carbon is building up.
     
  20. TCH2FLY

    TCH2FLY New Member

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    I'm not sure I understand the use of "butthurt" is that a reference to a childhood camping trip you had with an uncle?

    As far as being "schooled" ...well frankly LOL.
    I thought my post here was accurate, you have made it clear you are not saying there is an accuracy increase only that the rifle is easier to clean and to that end you have shown us your shiny bore. I stated that if this was the desired result then the process is good, doesn't this mean we agree ?