Bought a used G36 and found this...

Discussion in 'Glock Forum' started by TATE, Sep 27, 2011.

  1. TATE

    TATE New Member

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    Hey guys. I just purchased a used G36 Saturday and when I opened the case I found this envelope with 2 spent shells inside. Looks like they were sent to Glock for inspection or something. Should I be worried about malfunctions?

    [​IMG]
     
  2. rockhouse

    rockhouse New Member

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    Not at all. Those actually come from the manufacturer. Flock provides the purchaser of their fire arm 2 spent shells from the factory test fires.
     

  3. rockhouse

    rockhouse New Member

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    And I meant glock not flock. Dang I phone autocorrect.
     
  4. UrbanNinja

    UrbanNinja New Member

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    I received the same thing when I purchased an S&W sw99 .40 a few years ago. Inside the envelope was a shell and a note saying the pistol was test fired for "quality assurance" before leaving the factory.
     
  5. TATE

    TATE New Member

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    Cool. Thanks for the quick responses. I didn't know that they did that.
     
  6. c3shooter

    c3shooter Administrator Staff Member

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    There are some states that require that when a dealer sells a new handgun, that he must send a specimen fired cartridge case and info on the pistol to the State Police Databank- concept being that you can match a fired casing to the gun that fired it (crime investigation). THAT'S why you have the specimen. YOU live in a state that does not require the dealer to do that.

    Maryland is one such state. BTW, they have spent several million $$$ on that database. They have solved NO crimess with that. All of you that live in MD- why not throw the idiots out of office?
     
  7. UrbanNinja

    UrbanNinja New Member

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    I jade always wondered if there was some type of system like that. Its a great idea, IMO.
     
  8. 32tudor

    32tudor New Member

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    Most quality hand guns come with test fire casings
     
  9. Seven

    Seven New Member

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    I've always wondered where you get an application for that job? Official Firearm Tester Dude.
     
  10. CA357

    CA357 New Member Supporter

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    I'll write a reference letter for you. ;)
     
  11. MrWray

    MrWray New Member

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    I think that all of the handguns ive bought came with the 2 spent casings.. The high standard 1911 that i bought a few months ago came with them
     
  12. Mandy

    Mandy New Member

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    I can understand the relevance with a revolver, but with a semi auto like the Glock, any crook can swap bbl, extractor, firing pin and ejector and the cartridges will not match the gun, it's the same with many other firearms.

    probably the idea of one of those gun experts at office that say that a semi auto AR is an assault weapon, give me a break!!!!
     
  13. JonM

    JonM Moderator

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    its a pretty dumb idea. you cant match a case to a gun after months of use much less years. as the gun functions it will develop flaws in the bolt face extracter ejector and chamber changing it drasticaly from when it was first created.

    the only way forensic ballistics to work is to recover the gun very quickly after a crime before further use alters or adds more flaws to the critical work areas.

    trying to match a gun to a old bullet or case only works in detective fiction and csi miami. its a huge waste of taxpayer money. the only thing itdoes is make hoplophobes feel good.
     
  14. CHLChris

    CHLChris New Member

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    I can't even imagine a brand new pistol having marks that would distinguish it from others. Maybe certain batches or lots would have distinguishable marks, but gun to gun on a newly manufactured firearm seems really far-fetched.

    I agree with JonM (nothing new here;)) that it is just a huge waste of money...however it is NOT government money being wasted. It is another of those cases of onerous regulation that we hear about that costs consumers more and more money they shouldn't have to spend.