Bored and sitting on the truck

Discussion in 'The Club House' started by dwmiller, Sep 29, 2019.

  1. Caveman Jim

    Caveman Jim Well-Known Member

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    Good job so far.;)

    Too bad your not stuck up here near me, I’d take you fishing (catching Coho salmon) every day to occupy your time.:D

    That’s why I’ve been here briefly the last week or so.:oops:
     
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  2. dwmiller

    dwmiller Well-Known Member

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    Yes it's a wide one, 15' 6" windmill flanges to build those huge windmill towers. Not to heavy, only 67,000 lbs of cargo. 110,000 gross load. Just enough that when one trailer tire let go the rest went like a string of fireworks as they each overloaded. These are a weird "point load" that concentrates all the weight on just a couple points unless you adjust properly. And this trailer doesn't have individual axle gauges so I was just guessing at the loading and weight balancing...

    The nick on my finger came from forgetting that I was using a framing saw with widely offset teeth not one of my thin kerf Japanese pull saws. I tried to guide the bigger saw with my off hand finger to start the cut, like I do with the pull saws. Instant reminder of "don't be stupid".
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2019
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  3. dwmiller

    dwmiller Well-Known Member

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    Jim, I love fishing. Grew up on the only trout stream in Ohio, Mad River. It ran through the back property line of our farm. Learned to fly fish at a young age. Had an uncle teach me how to tie flies and make a bunch of my own tackle too. Most of my fishing gear has been packed away for years now. Just haven't had time while Trucking full time and getting my son's through college. If I'm up that way I'll take you up on your kind offer.
     
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  4. Caveman Jim

    Caveman Jim Well-Known Member

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    I look forward to meeting you one day.
     
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  5. dwmiller

    dwmiller Well-Known Member

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    Bracing is in the box, starting to think about a neck. That piece that looked so good at the start has warped in two directions, I'll definitely be looking for a better piece of wood. I could still split it in half and laminate it around a third piece. Just not with the equipment I have on my truck. Scarp joints are going to be hard enough. I need the neck to final size before I cut the hole in the side of the box and fit the top.

    If I was home I'd have clamped that neck blank straight to my workbench top and put my duracoat curing box over it for a few days. About a week at 200 degrees Farenheit works wonders on small pieces of damp wood. Dry them restrained like this and they stabilize straight and won't warp again.

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    I do too, one of the pleasures of my driving job is that I get to meet so many of our members, face to face.
     
  6. dwmiller

    dwmiller Well-Known Member

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    And the answer to "how close can you get with just a handsaw"? Pretty good, just by eye. That was held by hand, across the frame rails of my truck and cut. I'll clean it up with some sanding when I get the wood filler applied to those ugly finger joints...

    I won't bother with hinges on this box top. For my use the tops are just screwed/glued down into place anyway. I just need that top to figure the fingerboard thickness and back angle at the heel block. This sets the instruments string height at bottom of the fingerboard and determines how easy the instrument is to play. Lower is better!

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    Last edited: Oct 8, 2019
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  7. dwmiller

    dwmiller Well-Known Member

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    Top temporarily mounted with the screws and finish washers. Bottom screws put in at the same time. That last picture shows the little lip that I'll pare off with the chisel and sandpaper when I true up the sides after filler. Other three sides of the top are flush.

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  8. dwmiller

    dwmiller Well-Known Member

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    And the overhang after a little quality chisel time. Done for today unless I go buy filler, sandpaper and sanding sealer.. 20191008_161611.jpeg
     
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  9. dwmiller

    dwmiller Well-Known Member

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    20191011_170417.jpeg 20191011_170353.jpeg

    A bit of time on my hands this morning so I split that neck blank, lengthwise with the handsaw. Took me about 20-25 minutes as I have no good way to clamp the stock down. So across the rear frame rails of the semi and throw a thigh over the stick to pin it in place. Took a nick out of my finger again, too. Getting to be too common when using that cheap saw. Blade is awfully flexible for how thick it is. My older tempered saws are much thinner and stiffer. Easier to saw a straight line with too. Cut pieces are within 1/16" thickness each other across the length. Well within my happy zone for this project.

    Mainly did this to stop/minimize the warping as the neck blank dries. An older gentleman taught me about splitting thin pieces in pairs, reversing the splits and wrapping/binding them back together to minimize drying warps. Charlie used to build bows and used this method on his laminates after he cut pairs of tapers from a thicker plank. He wrapped the pairs up with twine in bundles after carefully aligning them. Then back into his storage woodpile for another six months to cure, stickered perfectly flat. Mine is strips of gorilla tape and hopefully another week tossed up on the top bunk of the truck. Don't know if it will help, but it can't hurt any worse. I can afford to loose that last 6 inches on the far end if I can't straighten it.

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    Need to start thinking about thicknessing, trueing and smoothing those pieces. Wish I had a hand plane. It's a Pita to smooth long boards with just a chisel. Those two sticks have beautiful vertical grain orientation. You can see it on the ends in the last picture. It'd be a shame to waste them. Still need a 3/4" piece to laminate between them, just haven't found a nice piece of dark wood yet. Cut the headstock scarp after that and glue on a thickener for the heel where it goes into the box. Maybe one more tool. One of those cheap hobbyist sized planes. That's all I'll buy, honestly...

    If I get near home anytime soon I'll plane those faces true with the thickness planer. Not cheating, just simple laziness. Planning stock by hand is hard work with good work holding. I'm dreading that job out on the truck...

    Those sticks spread apart almost a full inch as I sawed down the length. One took a bit of a twist too. If I was home, I'd clamp them flat to one of my benches and forget about them for a month.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2019
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  10. Sniper03

    Sniper03 Supporting Member Supporter

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    DW
    SAW!:rolleyes: I am proud of you! You still have all your Fingers!:p
    Project is still on and doing well I see!;)

    03
     
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  11. dwmiller

    dwmiller Well-Known Member

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    I don't know if I'd call it "going well", but I'm still stubbornly plodding forward. I really don't know if I'll use these pieces, they still need some curing time. If I come across a better piece of wood I could change directions pretty easily.

    I kept looking at that stick, every time I looked the warping bothered me more. Finally my OCD took a big bite this morning and I started sawing. Curse OCD, she's a cruel mistress.

    That's one of the reasons my trigger finger stays safely inside the saw handle...
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2019
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  12. big shrek

    big shrek Well-Known Member

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    The bad news is, a straight neck may give you a bow...when its under string tension it might BOW the wrong way and you end up with a curve under the strings...makes tuning a real PITA ;)

    Oh...and instead of Chisels, get some FINGER PLANES :)
    They work wonders when you get the hang of 'em.

    Good Luck!!
     
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  13. dwmiller

    dwmiller Well-Known Member

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    I'm actually planning on a single action truss rod to adjust neck bow for the string tension. Just like a standard guitar neck. One of the many reasons for laminating up the neck and angling the headstock. You can get a channel without a router.

    Most cigar box guitars don't have truss rods, but most longer neck musical instruments do. The four string design that I'm building often has a trussed neck to adjust for bowing like a normal guitar. Most three strings guitars do not, like violins. The four strings were often built by real guitar makers, the three's were more often home built instruments.

    The neck is the weak link in any box guitar home build. Most of them are built cheap, not to last. As you noted string tension destroys the neck straightmess eventually. It's not as big a deal if you only want to play with a slide. But finger playing on the frets is impossible if the string action gets too high. I've built a couple real guitars before this so I've got a plan on how to counter it for this build. Now whether its possible or not with limited tools...

    I thought about finger planes, also considered spokeshaves and draw knives as they might be easier to use. What I really need a fairly long body box plane to get straight and true surfaces over the necks length. Got to be straight and flat for this step to get a playable neck during glue up. If I can't do this part right nothing else matters. I've got all those planes sitting at home, just not out here. Kind of against the "truck only" spirit of what I've done so far. This part of the project might be beyond what's possible on the truck.

    My main problem on the truck is work holding. If anything kills this project that will be it. No way to fasten the piece of wood down while I work on it. I really need a few bigger clamps and a heavy piece of timber to clamp to for flattening and straightening. I'll see what I can repurpose when it's time for that step.
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2019
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